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Zinc Plating: Yellow, Clear, or Silver?

The Dilemma…Clear Zinc, Silver Zinc or Yellow Zinc Plating?  And, why??

When we were deciding what color zinc coating to use for our non-powdercoated steel parts that are going to see moisture and salt, we were asked whether we wanted to use Silver (Clear) Zinc or Yellow Zinc.

Silver Zinc on the left Yellow Zinc on right
Silver (Clear) Zinc on the left
Yellow Zinc on right

It really came down to this for us…Yellow Zinc is 2x to 3x more durable when it comes to corrosion resistance, so the decision was pretty easy.

Now, some folks think the silver looks better…myself included.  However, here’s the great news…you CAN have it all.  Yellow Zinc makes for a GREAT primer-coat, and you can spray the parts ANY color you want, right over the Yellow Zinc coating…AND have the extra corrosion resistance…at the same time!  (How often does THAT happen in life??  LOL!)

 

 

Corrosion Resistance of Yellow Zinc versus Silver Zinc
Corrosion Resistance of Yellow Zinc versus Silver Zinc

Our vendor sent us this chart in an e-mail, explaining “When comparing corrosion resistance (where all are plated to the same thicknesses), all types of silver (clear) zincs are inferior to equal types of yellow zincs.”.

So, yeah…that pretty much made up OUR mind…especially since you can paint right over it any color you want!  I love it when I can have BOTH :-) !!!!

Make today Ama-zinc!  😉

Kevin

 

Bump Steer? How To Fix: Measure Your Drag Link and Track Bar to Make them Parallel

Bump-steer Solutions and Causes, written by Kevin from KOR

Cause: The Drag Link and Track Bar on a coil-sprung vehicle are out-of-parallel.  (affects some coil-sprung Dodge, Jeep, and Ford models)

Result: You hit a bump, and the steering wheel moves first one direction, then the other direction.  The steering wheel will also pull out of your hands when you hit the brakes, sometimes DIVING into the next lane over.  Scary stuff!

Solution: You need to make the Track Bar and the Drag Link parallel to each other….but it’s not quite that simple.

Explanation: When a coil-sprung vehicle’s front suspension compresses, like during heavy braking, or over speedbumps, the front axle is forced to move in the arc that the track bar pushes or pulls it in.  The track bar is a solid chunk of steel, and it’s not compressing or stretching very far, lol, so the axle moves laterally (left/right) following the arc of the track bar.

From the factory, the Track Bar upper mount and lower mount were more or less parallel with the pavement.  When you hit a bump, VERY little side-to-side movement happens, because the TB is nearly parallel with the pavement.

However, when you lift a vehicle, the axle is moved away from the body/chassis.  This moves the track bar mounting points further away from each other, and moves the UPPER track bar mount further upward, and as a result, out-of-parallel with the pavement.

As long as the drag link’s (also known as a “steering link” or, incorrectly labeled sometimes as a “tie-rod”…) upper mount is moved *the same* distance upward (typically when installing a lift, both would move the same amount upward) as the upper mount on the track bar, the bars are kept parallel…(though they WILL both need to be lengthened slightly).  End result: very little, if any, bumpsteer.  All good!

However, old ideas never die…and some folks think that a dropped Pitman arm (the steering arm that the drag link attaches to at one end, and which attaches to the splined shaft on the steering gear at the other end) should be added when lifting EVERY vehicle.  On a leaf-sprung vehicle…this makes perfect sense!  You WANT the drag link as parallel to the factory setting (parallel with the pavement) because the axle cycles upward and townward following the leaf spring mounts, which is perfectly straight up and down.

However, on a coil-sprung vehicle, the axle follows the arc of the track bar, so adding a drop pitman arm is one of the worst things you can do…because it CREATES bumpsteer!  Remember, you want the track bar and the drag link to be nearly parallel.  Here’s how you do that…

Tools needed:
Tape measure, a print-out of this article, and a pen

What you want to do to resolve bump steer on a coil-sprung vehicle is make the amount of DROP the same amount on both bars.  If the drag link drops 4″ from left to right, then the track bar should drop 4″ from left to right.  Measure from the pavement up to the pivot point of each, and fill in the numbers here:

 

Lower (Pass. Side) Track Bar mounting bolt to pavement:

Upper (Driver Side) Track Bar mounting bolt to pavement:

 

Lower (Pass. Side) Tie Rod End CENTER on Drag Link to pavement:

Upper (Driver Side) Tie Rod End CENTER on Drag Link to pavement:

Bump Steer Measurements
How To Measure Track Bar and Drag Link to eliminate Bump Steer

 

 

Now, subtract the LOWER measurement from the UPPER measurement for BOTH of the bars.  Each bar will have a number between 0″ and 12″.  How much are they off?  Can you easily make them closer to being the same?  Do you need a drop Pitman arm?  Do you need a factory Pitman arm?  Do you need to relocate one of the track bar mounts upwards or downwards?

Now, even if you get these within an eighth-inch of each other, you’re still going to have the bars moving in a slightly different arc, because typically the drag link is longer (moves in a slower lateral motion through it’s arc) and the track bar is typically shorter (moves in a faster lateral motion through it’s arc).  However, you can get lucky and almost feel no bump steer with enough tweaking with it.  In an ideal world, both bars would be exactly the same length, but that ain’t reality.  You can make up for this by making the track bar SLIGHTLY MORE parallel with the pavement than the drag link is, and as they go through their similar-but-not-same arcs of motion, the track bar will move the axle less laterally the more parallel to the pavement it is.

So, essentially, that’s it.  Hope for the best, expect something less than perfection, and tinker with it until you get it as close as you can.  Every vehicle is a bit different, and each has it’s own level of difficulty of modification, but with some tweaking, you should be able to get this really close!

Happy Braking!

Kevin

This blog post was inspired by Jeremy S., who wrote to us asking how to fix his Bump Steer.  If you have a question you can’t get answered elsewhere, e-mail us, and we’ll make YOU a blog post about it, so that others can benefit from the info as well.  :-)

 

WJ Grand Cherokee – The Ultimate Buyer’s Guide

WJ Grand Cherokee – The Ultimate Buyer’s Guide

I stumbled across this post on JeepForum.com written by Richard (Billzcat1) which I thought was OUTSTANDING, and covered a bunch of stuff one needs to know before they purchase a 1999-2004 WJ Grand Cherokee. For an all-purpose off-road vehicle, highway vehicle, and grocery getter, it’s extremely tough to beat the WJ (and ZJ) Grand Cherokees, and if you know where to look, you can find all sorts of aftermarket modifications for the WJ Grand Cherokee.

WJ Grand Cherokee – The Ultimate Buyer’s Guide

Introduction
“What SUV should I buy?” It is a question that has plagued Mankind ever since first he gazed upon the vast Mojave desert, the striking peak of Kilimanjaro, or the crowded Costco parking lot. The WJ model has a lot to offer for a reasonable price which is why nearly 1.6 million were produced over a 5-year run.

If you’re reading this, you probably have a lot of questions! “What engine should I get?” “What are some common problems?” “What should I look out for?” “What’s the difference between models?” See the posts below to find out more!

The Basics

The WJ Grand Cherokee was released in 1999 as replacement for the successful ZJ Grand Cherokee (1993-1998). It featured a similar basic chassis design with a completely updated interior and exterior design. Improvements were made to the existing 4.0L inline-6 engine and an all-new 4.7L SOHC V8 was released as well. The uni-frame chassis was made considerably stiffer and the suspension was refined with new control arms all around, rubber spring isolators, a new steering system, and a new 3-link rear suspension. The brakes were also enlarged to 12″ diameter rotors and dual-piston calipers were added up front. Other improvements included moving the spare tire under the cargo area floor (improving cargo volume), and dual-bulb headlights which put significantly more light on the road with less glare to oncoming drivers. The new 4.7L engine also gave better fuel economy than the 5.2L it replaced, though it did make slightly less torque.

The end result is a quieter and more responsive driving experience with improved cargo capacity.

The WJ won numerous industry awards for its engine and 4WD systems, including Ward’s 10 Best Engines (for the 4.7L PowerTech V8), North American Truck of the Year, 4X4 of the Year (Peterson’s 4-Wheel and Offroad), Best of What’s New (Popular Science), and Technology of the Year (Automobile Magazine, for the QuadraDrive 4WD system)

Competitors
The early 2000s were a boon time for SUVs as the economy was strong and fuel prices low. There are dozens of mid-size SUVs that are comparable in size and features. However, you’ll find that most offer lower power for a higher price. There are only two SUVs I would consider a direct competitor in terms of features, luxury, and off-road prowess: The Land Rover Discovery II and the Toyota Land Cruiser.Yes, there are more luxurious, more capable, and more sporty SUVs, but very few successfully blend in all categories.

Read the rest of the article here:

http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f310/ultimate-wj-grand-cherokee-buyers-guide-1271979/

An Ode to Death Wobble, by The Curmudgeon – Blog Post

This slid across my desk, and thought the guy’s writing was awesome, and wanted to share.

Here’s what it’s like to have Death Wobble if you’re Ernest Hemingway.

http://adaptivecurmudgeon.wordpress.com/2014/02/18/death-wobble-part-vi/

Enjoy!
Kevin

Pretty Bad Ass 5.9L on the dunes…

This 5.9L Grand Cherokee sounds GREAT climbing the dunes!

Are You Waiting To Live Until You Get Ready To Die?

Elizabeth Alraune - Relating To Cancer
Elizabeth Alraune – Relating To Cancer

I was up at the Grand Canyon this last weekend (supporting my buddy, Jim, with a goal he set to hike the Canyon from the South Rim to the Colorado River, and back), and met the most amazing woman while I was enjoying the sunrise!

I had just dropped Jim off at the Bright Angel Trail Head, and was hanging out outside the Bright Angel Lodge, watching the sun come up, and enjoying the view when a woman named Elizabeth asked me if I was scared to be sitting on the edge of the canyon on the rock wall.  I joked, “Nah, this wall has been here at least 75 years…it should be fine!”, and with one smart ass comment, we started a deep discussion.

 Turns out, Elizabeth is dying of ovarian cancer, and she is on what may perhaps be her last trip of her life.  She visited her OB/GYN regularly, was healthy, got  regular Physicals, and yet was still not quickly diagnosed with what ended up being a 10cm tumor.  :-(  How horrible that must have been, to get that news!  She was extremely matter-of-fact about it, and was able to share what a lot of people may not have been open enough to share…including how she’s been feeling, how scared she was, and how nothing else mattered, aside from her taking this road trip, as what may end up being a last-ditch effort to live her passions.  She’s from the East Coast, and decided to take this trip across the US, by renting a car (her car was not going to make it…) and making it happen with a VERY limited budget.  She’s on her way to Santa Monica, CA, and then back to the East Coast to begin chemotherapy.

One of the things we talked about was how many of our family, friends, and neighbors, wouldn’t take a trip like this, until they had a rude awakening like being diagnosed with cancer.   We talked about how a major turn of events helps to “distill” the things we’re passionate about into a real plan, whereas before it was just a “some-a-day” thing.  How odd that we’re taught, in our society, to work, work, work, work, work our way to death, and wait around for a 2 week vacation to race across the State (or a few States) to spend a little time doing something OTHER than work, for a short period each year.  We’re not taught to do “mini-retirements” like Timothy Ferriss talks about in his book “The Four Hour Workweek” or to automate our businesses like Michael Gerber talks about in “The E-Myth”.  Quite the opposite, actually.

I’m going to post a link to Elizabeth’s blog here: www.RelateToCancer.com and if you’d like to help KOR meet our goal of raising $500 to help her fund her shoestring-budget trip back home to start chemotherapy, here’s a link to donate: http://www.cancersupportfoundation.org/contribute (put ‘Elizabeth Alraune’ in the “Designation” field).  

After donating, my question for you today, is this: “Are you living like you’re dying, or are you dying while you’re living?”

Thank you so much for being so generous! -Kevin

Tread Lightly! 6th Annual Charity Auction on eBay

TREAD LIGHTLY CHARITY AUCTION

Tread Lightly is doing their 6th Annual Charity Auction Nov 1st through 11th, 2013. We’ve helped out a bit by donating one of our Safari Roof Racks to the auction, hoping to generate an extra $1,000 or so to their cause.  Auction link to follow, once

Would you PLEASE share this post with your Jeep clubs, friends, family, and anyone else you know with a Jeep via Facebook and Twitter?  We want to build the largest group of bidders possible, to raise as much as possible to keep TreadLightly! moving forward with accelerated growth!   In many cases, we have the work of this group to thank for MANY of our trails being kept open.  Others have tried to shut them down.

Here’s the link to the auction: http://www.ebay.com/sch/treadlightly!/m.html?_nkw=&_armrs=1&_ipg=&_from=

…and here’s Tread Lightly’s eBay page: http://www.ebay.com/usr/treadlightly!

Tread Lightly Press Release - 6th Annual eBay Auction for Charity
Tread Lightly Sixth Annual eBay Auction – Charity Funds Raiser to Keep Trails Open, and Build Awareness

tion Press Release

Please support the Tread Lightly partners verbally, and thank them for their contributions to this great organization:

http://treadlightly.org/partners/official-partners/

 

Here’s what Tread Lightly stands for:

http://treadlightly.org/about-us/what-we-do/

 

And here’s how to share their content on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TLoutdoorethics and Twitter: https://twitter.com/tread_lightly to help build awareness.

Thank you for helping Tread Lightly continue their movements forward and keep our trails open!!

 

(In case the image above doesn’t work, here’s the text of the Press Release)

For More Information Contact:
Jerrica Archibald
jerrica@treadlightly.org (801) 627-0077

Manufacturers and Outdoor Retailers Unite Again in Support of Tread Lightly! Charity Auction on eBay
SALT LAKE CITY, UT (November, 2013) – In support of Tread Lightly!’s work to proactively protect
recreation access and opportunities across America, more than 50 companies have donated nearly 150
products to the nonprofit organization to sell during its Sixth Annual Charity Auction on eBay, November
1-11, 2013.
This year’s big ticket item is a John Deere Gator XUV 825i utility vehicle. In addition to the Gator, items
up for sale during the auction will include various automotive aftermarket accessories and 4X4 products
as well as plenty of outdoor gear. One hundred percent of the money raised will go to help keep the
great outdoors, especially roads and trails open to motorized vehicles, healthy, open and accessible to
the public.
“These vital resources help Tread Lightly! provide materials, programs and services that are not only
solutions to some of the most pressing issues surround recreation, but also very cost-effective tools,”
said Tread Lightly!’s executive director Lori McCullough. “The money raised from this annual auction
supports Tread Lightly!’s mission to promote responsible recreation and keep respected access open
access.”
Tread Lightly! would like to extend a special thanks to this year’s top donors:
John Deere
Moose Racing
KYMCO
Blue Ridge Expeditions
Adjust-A-Grill
KevinsOffroad.com
ARB 4×4 Accessories
Michigan Truck Spring
Toytec
Rampage Products
Bushwacker, Inc.
Zone Offroad Products
SuperWinch
Nisstec

Tread Lightly! is a national nonprofit organization with a mission to promote responsible recreation through ethics education
and stewardship programs. Tread Lightly!’s educational message, along with its unique training and restoration initiatives are
strategically designed to instill an ethic of responsibility in outdoor enthusiasts and the industries that serve them. The program
is long-term in scope with a goal to balance the needs of the people who enjoy outdoor recreation with our need to maintain a
healthy environment. Tread Lightly!’s award-winning materials, programs and services are solutions to some of the nation’s
most pressing recreation issues. Individuals and businesses can commit to Tread Lightly! and protect outdoor access by
becoming a member at www.treadlightly.org.
###

Grand Slam Texas – GSTX 2013

Had an AMAZING time with the Texas Chapter of Grand Slam this weekend.  My buddy Jack and his wife put a BUNCH of time and effort into the event, and it came off without a hitch!  We had several days to run the trails at Hidden Falls Adventure Park (near Marble Falls, TX), which was AWESOME!!  This event was dedicated to Cherokee and Grand Cherokee Jeeps, and also open to Wranglers as well.  I met a nice-sized group of a bunch of VERY friendly Texans, always quick to share their food and their drinks with the out-of-town guy from Phoenix.  Got to meet a couple of past customers, and quite a few future customers as well, and KevinsOffroad and Clayton Offroad, both, were able to donate to the raffle, wanting to support the event to secure future events as well.

Next year, we’re going to help promote Grand Slam Texas via our website and Facebook pages, to assist Jack and his family in building this event to be one of the most fun Grand Slam events in the country.  It already has all the features needed for success:  dedication to the sport, friendly planners, loads of fun times, an awesome selection of trails, and AMAZING food!!

I’ll let you guys know more as time goes on, but Jack and his family did a GREAT job at planning this thing out, and you should certainly put GSTX 2014 on your list of to-dos for next year!!

Unibody Frame Crack Repair – How To Fix Uniframe Stress Cracking

I got this e-mail from a customer today, and thought I’d post it on our blog, so that others could benefit as well:

“I found out that my “new” zj has frame cracks at spring perches, near the steering box, rear spring perches, etc.Took to a very good jeep guy for welding. He wouldn’t do it, because he says the frame is galvanized inside and outside, and if he welded it, it would just crack again. Yet I read where people weld it all the time. What is the real story here? Are there actual frame repair kits? I spent $400+ on a variable steering box thinking the steering box was the issue-nope.  Got a Teraflex replacement track bar for $200+[didn’t know about yours], only to find out someone had moved the bracket on the right side about two inches higher, so the Teraflex bar wouldn’t work. It had a 3″ Skyjacker lift when I got it, and the “expert” [he actually is] says that the subframe ZJ’s were never meant to be lifted, and that contributed highly to the cracked frame issue. Comments? advice? parts that would fix the problem? Thanks, I hope”

Our response:

Hey there. Sorry to hear about the problem you’re having with your new rig.  Nothing sucks more than purchasing something that has more problems than you originally signed up for!!

The expert you spoke to is absolutely right…almost.  “Galvanizing” is a process to keep oxidation from starting in on a metal piece…in this case, a very thin heat-treated piece of sheet steel (your unibody frame rail).  When welding, the galvanizing will turn into a gas when heated, and will dissipate during welding, causing not only hazardous fumes, but also, more rust in the future (unless it’s re-treated with rust inhibitor).
However, that doesn’t mean that it’s safe to weld to the heat-treated “frame rail” without following a very careful process…
Before the Jeep is assembled, it’s assembled from bent pieces of steel, spot welded together, then heat-treated (cooled very slowly, over days, sometimes), to make the steel more rigid than it was previously in it’s “raw” form.  When you heat the steel again (the welding process), it doesn’t cool (“anneal”) properly, and will be FAR weaker in the section that’s been welded, than what it was from the factory.  So, merely welding up cracks is NOT going to be effective, and will indeed re-crack…typically on either side of the weld that was laid in to repair the first crack.  So, yeah…that’s a dead end, for sure…he’s right about that!
So, what do you do?  Well, assuming you already own the Jeep and you’re not able to avoid it, or return it, there is a process called “fish-plating” in conjunction with “stich-welding” or “skip-welding”, which reduces some of the “damage” caused by welding and not cooling the steel in a controlled environment, in a controlled time-frame, like the manufacturer did originally.

Fishplate Frame Repair

 

Fish Plating requires another piece of steel to be laid OVER the original piece with the cracks in it, to reduce the stress on that particular area…spreading the forces over a far greater area.  Typically, you’d want to have the fish plate stretch as far past the cracks in both directions, as practically possible, particularly if you can tie it in to a cross-section or thicker part of the frame rail.  Here’s an image of a fishplate frame repair, but it’s also fully welded (you don’t want to fully weld it!)

 

 

 

 

Skip-weld or Stitch-weld
Skip Weld or Stitch Weld
What you’ll want to do, to keep the heat down, and to strengthen the repair, is to use a “skip weld” or “stitch weld” process, which means you weld a short section, skip a section, weld another section, skip another section, and so on.  Typically you’d want to weld AROUND the corners of the fishplate (so that it doesn’t twist or pull up under stress), and leave the long sections welded in a stitch pattern.  Here’s an image of a stitch weld (also called skip-weld).  By using a stitch-weld (or skip-weld), you reduce warpage, you reduce heat build-up and the possiblty of burning through the frame rail completely, and you reduce the amount of annealing that you’re removing from the factory heat-treated frame rail.  Though it may look “weak” to an untrained eye, it’s actually a MUCH stronger repair in this case, because you didn’t change the temper of the entire area around the fishplate, which would make it brittle…you ONLY tempered the areas that the weld touched, and a small perimeter around it.  That leaves the “open” areas still rigid, and the fishplate serves as a stress-reducer on the areas underneath which already have the cracks in it.
You can also use a “Plug weld” technique on your fishplate, with success.  Here’s a really nice example on an JeepSpeed XJ Cherokee:
Rosette Weld Fish Plate from Pirate4x4.com
Rosette Weld Fish Plate from Pirate4x4.com
To the best of my knowledge, there are no shops that sell formed/cut fishplates for any model Grand Cherokee, so it will need to be formed by hand.  A really good fabrication shop who’s familiar with welding dissimilar metals could assist you with this pretty easily…but you’ll need to search around for someone who’s done it a million times…this is NOT a job for the uninitiated or inexperienced.  This is Certified Welder, super-fab, race car builder territory…not the shade tree welder guy from down the street!!  I’ve seen more hacked-up frame repairs than I’ve seen frame cracks…it seems like everyone wants to “do it cheap”, so they take it to someone who has NO IDEA how to do it properly, and if luck prevails, it’ll hold up for a few weeks or months, and then let go in the most catastrophic failure you’ve ever seen, in the worst possible place (off road somewhere muddy, with no tow-truck access, typically…it’s happened EXACTLY that way with two different rigs, in two different states, fixed by two different non-expert welders!!)
Hunt around your area for someone who’s extremely talented in fabrication and perhaps racing repairs near you, who’s willing to take on the job, and has photos of repairs he’s already done for people who are still using their rigs.  This is not an easy repair, and needs to be done right, the FIRST TIME.  Prepare to spend some money, my friend…cheap enough ain’t good enough, in this case.
-Kevin

OX13 – Overland Expo 2013- Flagstaff, AZ

We had an amazing time this year at the Overland Expo, just like last year! So many cool rigs to check out, and so many fantastic vendors offering up the coolest stuff you’ve never seen. the weekend started off with a kickoff ceremony, and the founders gave us introductions to the folks that would be helping run the event all weekend. Some of these guys, had journeyed in from around the world, to come in, just for this event. It’s kind of a big deal in the Overlanding circles. They gave Q&A discussions on how to deal with border guards, what to pack, what to leave behind, and all sorts of other travel tips you’d need to know before you packed up and headed out for a trip around the globe. Topics covered included how to bribe border guards, how to remain safe in foreign countries, how NOT to look like a jackass tourist (LOL) what to leave behind, what to pack, and how to prepare for your journey, so that you are as self-reliant as possible.

There were some absolutely amazing rigs out here, too. Everything from Earthroamers to Mercedes Unimogs, ambulances with four-wheel drive converted into RVs, JK Wranglers with diesel engine swaps, old fashioned Range Rovers with upgraded suspension and engines that had been removed from modern-day vehicles. There was the entire series of of Toyota FJ’s from the 1960s and on. Even a group of Westfalia VW camper vans were there, as well as the sports Mobile conversion guys, the ones with the Ford vans and the top that expands upwards, outfitted with four-wheel drive. SUPER COOL STUFF! You’ve GOT to see all the cool Overland rigs in the video of me driving around through the parking lot checking stuff out, it’s fantastic!

Read more about Overland Expo 2012 at Overland Journal

Dodge Installation Instruction Guides

(If you have questions or a comment… post it below, and we’ll answer you ASAP!)

Ford Installation Instruction Guides

(If you have questions or a comment… post it below, and we’ll answer you ASAP!)

SRT8 Jeep Grand Cherokee for Running Moonshine, lol…

Using an SRT8 Jeep Grand Cherokee for Running Moonshine, lol…

Caught this video and thought I would share…it’s pretty funny.  If nothing else, it highlights the capabilities of the SRT8 Jeep Grand Cherokee WK2.  Damned impressive, I say!!  I’m seriously considering picking one of these up, and modifying it.  Not for offroad purposes, but as a sleeper, to eat up the uninitiated at the stop light, embarrassing them in front of their passenger.  :-)

Check out the video below…it made me smile, and hopefully it will you as well.

 

SRT8 Jeep Grand Cherokee
SRT8 Jeep Grand Cherokee

Specs on the SRT8 Jeep Grand Cherokee

  • 470hp 6.4L Hemi V8
  • 465 lb·ft of torque
  • 5-Speed Automatic Transmission
  • Quadra-Trac® Active On Demand 4WD
  • Selec-Track System
  • 4-Wheel Traction Control
  • Electronic Stability Control
  • Electronic Limited-Slip Rear Differential

More about the SRT8 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT at Wikipedia

 

 

Dodge Wobble | Death Wobble and How To Fix It – Death Wobble Causes

 Dodge Wobble: How To Fix Your Own Case Of Dreaded Death Wobble

(If you have questions or a comment… post it below, and we’ll answer you ASAP!)

As you have already found out, ” Dodge Wobble ” (also known as Ram Death Wobble ) is the horrible front end vibration that starts when one tire (usually the right tire first) hits a groove or bump in the pavement somewhere around 40~50mph.  Dodge Wobble is quite possibly the worst possible downside to having a coil-sprung front suspension on a vehicle with a track bar or panhard bar.  Among the vehicles affected by this design are the Dodge Ram 1500,  Dodge 2500, and Dodge 3500 (and also include Jeep Cherokee XJ, the Jeep Grand Cherokee ZJ and WJ, TJ and JK Jeep Wrangler, and trucks like Toyota, Ford,  as well as early Ford Broncos).  This page is specific to the Dodge Ram Death Wobble Problem and discusses Death Wobble Causes and Cures.

Death Wobble is also extremely difficult to try to diagnose and fix, because it is actually caused by slop in the entire steering system and the axle attachment as a whole, not by one component.

To diagnose and fix Death Wobble correctly, you or your mechanic needs to look for “play” everywhere in the steering and front suspension system, searching for anything that could have “play” in it.  It’s very time consuming to find a Death Wobble fix, and can be downright dangerous while you are in “testing phase”, trying to exorcise this demon from your Dodge Ram.  Here is a step-by-step guide you can print out and take outside with you, so that you can get your Dodge Wobble problem fixed once and for all.

Ram Death Wobble Causes and Cures
Dodge Ram Front Suspension

Step 1)  The place I tell people to start, is with an overall visual inspection.  Spend 10 solid minutes under the front end, visually inspecting each one of the steering components for shiny spots on steel, rubber, or polyeurthane, which is typically indicative of suspension components that are moving around when they are not supposed to be.  Pay CAREFUL attention to the track bar (also called a Panhard Bar inside and ouside the USA, as well as variant spellings (and misspellings…) of  trackbar, tracbar, and trak-bar ).  The Track Bar is  often the culprit in many cases.  And, if any of your bolts are even the least bit loose, Death Wobble also can manifest itself and make your life a living hell, so check for looseness everywhere. 

Step 2)  If everything appears to be “normal” on the underside of your Ram, and you’ve verified the bolt tightness on both ends of the track bar, the next thing to do is to start with a good quality front end alignment by a reputable shop who is familiar with the nuances of aligning both a stock height and a lifted suspension 4×4.

 

Dodge Ram Caster Angle to Eliminate Dodge Wobble
Dodge Wobble is cured or substantially reduced with new tight steering components and the correct caster.

Step 3)  Have them make sure that caster (frequently misspelled as ” castor “) is set correctly, as well as the proper toe-in.  If you have recently hit a large pot hole, curb, or you’ve been offroading and have bent your tie rod even slightly, that, also, will throw off your alignment.  Plus, it’s only $40 or so at your local alignment shop.  By the way, DO NOT let the alignment shop talk you into a four-wheel alignment, as this is only useful on vehicles with independent rear suspension in my experience, and since there are no adjustment points in the rear of a live-axle vehicle ANYWAY, you’re merely paying for a service that you won’t get by the time you leave the alignment shop.  Furthermore, if you have a lift kit suspension installed on your Ram, make sure that the alignment shop you choose knows the variant specifications for lifted vehicles, and that they do NOT set it to the “default/stock” settings.  A good quality alignment shop familiar with lifted Dodge 4×4 trucks will know these settings, and a poor quality shop will likely tell you that it doesn’t matter whether it’s lifted or not…and that they use the stock specs.  If so, walk away immediately, or hang up the phone and call the next shop, if they do.

Step 4)  If you are now *certain* that the front end alignment that it’s set correctly, and that you have not replaced ANY other front end components recently (including tires or wheels) that may have caused the dreaded Dodge Wobble oscillation to begin, I tell people the next most suspect thing is the factory front track bar.  Over time, the tie rod end on the upper portion of the Panhard or track bar will develop slop (some applications, including the Dodge Ram, have a rubber bushing configuration, which also wears out)  in it due to wear and miles on the vehicle.  The same findings often goes for the lower end bushing, which has a rubber or polyurethane isolator bushing in it, and this “slop” will allow the Dreaded Death Wobble oscillation to occur. Aftermarket trackbars generally come with urethane bushings that allow a LOT less “play” (with respect to movement / crush) than the factory rubber bushings do (the Hard-KOR SuperDurometer Track Bar Bushings we developed, due to this problem, has a lot less play than even an aftermarket style Polyurethane bushing).  The problem with most aftermarket track bars for the Jeep is that they also come with either a Heim joint, Johnny Joint, or tie rod end on the upper end of the Track Bar, which works fine for a while, but wears out over time, leaving you right back where you started, with a large mess in your shorts, a temporarily deafened right ear (from the wife screaming for dear life, or, quite possibly at YOU, for buying your Ram to begin with, lol), and an overall high level of frustration with your entire Dodge in general…which doesn’t often lead into a smooth, stress-free trip.

Upgrade Kit for Dodge Ram Track Bar
Dodge Ram Track Bar Upgrade to Tighten Steering and Help Eliminate Dodge Wobble

The reason why Dave developed the Dodge Wobble Resistant Track Bar Kit is to eliminate that problematic (and expensive to have to replace when it wears out) previously mentioned joint, as well as for the additional flex benefits you get out of it.  If you are running an Dodge Ram with or without Dodge Wobble, and it has more than 1.5″ of lift, I highly recommend you check it out. Many aftermarket track bars as well as the stock track bar are completely ineffective in managing Death Wobble due to their “effective angle of operation” particularly if you are above say 2 or 3 inches of lift.  Keep the thought in the back of your mind, that another alignment is necessary after replacing ANY front end components, especially if Ram Death Wobble still remains.  Sometimes you might get lucky and don’t need one…but be forewarned.

A complementary product we have found to work VERY well in getting rid of Death Wobble is our exclusive Hard-KOR brand SuperDurometer Track Bar Bushings, which are also available for the Dodge Wobble Resistant Track Bar Kitand fit most “normal” sized 1.6″ ID by 1.25″ deep aftermarket and factory track bar end loops, which would originally take a 1.6″ OD rubber cartridge bushing.  Our SuperDurometer Track Bar Bushings are about TWO TIMES as hard as the typical polyurethane bushings that come in most aftermarket track bars, (which typically are made by Daystar or Energy Suspension for most of the various aftermarket manufacturers).  Polyurethane bushings are also one of the least expensive replacement parts in the steering components, so they make sense to try first.

Ram Death Wobble Causes and CuresStep 5)  The next thing to check is your steering damper.  I recommend AT THE MINIMUM, replacing the damper (or stabilizer, as it’s sometimes called) at the same time as whatever worn components that you find under the front end, as this “combination punch” is very often more effective than the change caused by each of the parts alone.  Death Wobble shakes EVERYTHING, and loosens up OTHER components at the same time.  I’ve found that replacing the damper by itself often times doesn’t eliminate Dodge Wobble directly, but that it often helps with some other poor handling characteristics, which cause the onset of Dodge Wobble and Ram Death Wobble (such as wandering, for instance) and a new one seems to tighten up the entire steering system.  I ONLY recommend the Dodge Wobble Resistant DTP Dual Steering Damper, because it seems to be tighter and work better for stopping Ram Death Wobble than the other manufacturers of steering dampers and stabilizers on the market (and I’ve tried them all, trying like hell to get rid of a Death Wobble problem years ago).  They are also the most heavy duty that I’m aware of.  These two stabilizers are the ONLY ones that I recommend to ANYONE who is having trouble with Ram Death Wobble, and it’s also one of the least expensive parts to replace in your steering system to attempt to remedy the dreaded Dodge Wobble problem.

Step 6)  Here are some other steering components to check over for looseness or improper movement:

  • Tie Rod Ends (all four, plus the upper track bar end)

  • Upper and Lower Ball Joints

  • Track Bar Mounting Bracket Bolts

  • Steering Box Bolts

  • Track Bar Ends

Dodge Ram Steering Stabilizer
Steering Stabilizer for Dodge Ram 1500, 2500, & 3500

Another product that we’ve found assists measurably with Dodge Wobble, is our DTP Steering Stabilizer Steering Box Brace for the Dodge Ram 1500, Dodge 2500, and Dodge 3500, which holds the steering gear box tightly on those two models, allowing the additional stresses of running larger-than-stock tires be directed to BOTH frame rails, rather than depending on the three little bolts that hold the gear to the frame, which get loose and if they do, will snap the gear box ears off the box, and leave you stranded somewhere you don’t want to be. Another source of Ram Death Wobble & Dodge Wobble is over-inflated tires ( See Boyle’s Law and consider how much more volume of air is inside your 35″ or 37″ tires compared to stock-sized tires).

Step 7)  The last thing that I can mention that has caused Death Wobble in the past is hub bearings.  If there is a little slop in them over the years and miles, they MAY indeed help to cause the oscillation as well.  I mentioned them last because they are the most expensive to replace, and probably least likely to be the ROOT of the problem (though they might be a component adding to the problem). While you have the front end apart, you should consider adding some offset upper ball joints to your Dodge Ram if you’re running a lift kit, in order to return the caster back to what a stock Ram would be if you are running say 4″ of lift or more.  Be aware that on 4×4 models, by NOT changing the ball joints to the offset type, you add more vibration to the front drive shaft since you are also turning your pinion angle downward in conjunction with every caster angle increase.  In other words, you can’t have one without the other, and on the full-time 4×4 models, you’ll get a little vibration at highway speeds by NOT doing so.  Compared to Dreaded Dodge Wobble, however, this is a VERY small price to pay, lol.

Hopefully this short checklist gets you started on the right foot and helps to cure your Dodge Wobble problems, and gives you a permanent Death Wobble Fix.

Very Sincerely,

-=Kevin=-

2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee Refreshed

Article from http://wot.motortrend.com/caught-refreshed-2014-jeep-grand-cherokee-completely-revealed-295741.html

 

Caught: Refreshed 2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee Completely Revealed

Written by:  [G+] on November 27 2012 11:00 AM

Read more: http://wot.motortrend.com/caught-refreshed-2014-jeep-grand-cherokee-completely-revealed-295741.html#ixzz2DYGmcRYY

2014-Jeep-Grand-Cherokee-Limited-front-three-quarters-view

Jeep isn’t exactly ready to officially show you the 2014 Grand Cherokee in its entirety, but two prototypes have been caught running around without any hint of camouflage, allowing us to see what’s in store for the 2014 model year.

2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited front fascia detail 300x187 imageUp front, the 2014 Grand Cherokee receives an all-new front fascia, which boasts a new implementation of the Jeep seven-bar grille graphic. Previously, the grille surround ended at the inner corners of the headlamps, but it now continues to the outer edges of the fascia before wrapping up into the headlamps. Expect that surround to vary between different trim grades – as shown here, the 2014 Grand Cherokee Limited appears to use a body-color surround, while the surround on the 2014 Grand Cherokee Laredo prototype is painted a contrasting argent color.

Kevin says: “LOVE the new headlamps…that’s a really cool look.”

Speaking of headlamps, these new units appear slightly narrower than before, boasting a cut-away edge and lighting pattern that reminds us of the Chrysler 300.  Fog lamps are also revised: the current Grand Cherokee uses round fog lamps placed within trapezoidal openings sunk into the front bumper. The new Grand Cherokee seems to use trapezoidal fog lamps, which flare from the bumper surface and are flanked with chrome bezels. The lower air intake is also restyled to provide a smoother look, and is home to tow hooks on four-wheel-drive Grand Cherokees.

Kevin says: “Did I read that correctly…tow hooks on ALL four wheel drive Grands??  It’s about time, Jeep!!”

2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited tailgate detail 300x187 imageJeep’s designers didn’t mess with much at the Grand Cherokee’s tail, but a few small revisions help tidy the SUV’s appearance. Designers deleted the trim panel that previously spanned the width of the tailgate, and also revised the Grand Cherokee’s taillamps. The taillamps’ lens pattern forms a ring that neatly echoes the headlamps’ shape.

Kevin says: “I like it…AND…it still looks like a BMW X5 to me”

We’ve yet to see any photos of interior revisions, but expect them to be mild – we wouldn’t be surprised to find new trim materials or interior colors, along with the latest iteration of Chrysler’s 8.4-inch UConnect touch-screen infotainment system.
Kevin says: “Sweet!”

Although there is some rumbling of a smaller, 3.2-liter version of the present 3.6-liter Pentastar V-6 being added to the Grand Cherokee’s portfolio, expect the biggest mechanical revision to be the advent of the ZF-licensed eight-speed automatic transmission. A 5.7-liter Hemi V-8 will still be offered as an option, and the 6.4-liter Hemi V-8 will remain an exclusive to the SRT8 model. Jeep executives also previously confirmed a diesel-powered Grand Cherokee will be sold in North America, but its timing remains a bit unclear.

Kevin says: “Oohhhyeaaahhh!!  Diesel power, Grand Cherokee comfort, and an 8-speed tranny will be freakin’ sweet…and if it’s under $40k, also a good value, compared to other options”

Look for the new 2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee to make its public debut early next year, perhaps at either the Detroit or Chicago auto show.

 

 

SEMA 2012 Photos – Las Vegas – Oct 31st – Part 1 of 3 – SEMA Photos

SEMA 2012 Photos Inside…

AWESOME show in Vegas this week…and we’ve got the SEMA 2012 Photos to prove it! The Specialty Equipment Manufacturer’s Association is doing their Annual trade show in Las Vegas, and I’m here to take it all in, and search out new product to add to our site! Where is the ‘suck’ in that??!!

Here’s a link to our SEMA 2012 photos from Wednesday, Oct 31st!!

https://picasaweb.google.com/100993404261029379103/SEMA2012

Additionally, I video’d Ken Block do his version of Gymkhana around the parking lot of the Las Vegas Convention Center, which I’ll post up on our YouTube account…so freakin’ cool !!!!!

https://www.youtube.com/kevinsoffroadmanf

SEMA 2012

Baja 1000 x 3 | KOR’s Jeep Expedition To Cabo San Lucas and back…

Baja 1000 x 3 – Down and back to Cabo San Lucas

Oct 8th, 2012

So, we’re just now back from an AMAZING Jeep Expedition down the Baja California Peninsula, tracking part of the Baja 1000 route, which we began in Mexicali, went through San Felipe, Gonzaga Bay, Guerrero Negro, Santa Rosalia, Mulege, San Ignacio, La Paz, San Jose del Cabo, Todos Santos, Loreto, Santo Tomas, Ensenada, and finally back to the US of A at the Border Crossing in Tecate. Amazing trip…I recommend it highly!

My 20-year-old daughter, Ally, was my copilot on this trip. It had been probably four years…maybe six…since we had been on an adventure together, just the two of us, and we had a fantastic time together! We met up with a local Phoenician, Sam, and that three of us headed down to Calexico to meet Russ, the trip leader, and cross the border. We did so without incident, and arrived our accommodations for the first night at a corporate hotel in Mexicali. After getting swaped to another room because our air conditioner was on the Fritz (or should I say Francis?), we took a quick shower, and headed off to dinner at a recommended restaurant recommended by the front desk, at which we were pleasantly surprised at both the service, and the food.

At dinner, Ally asked me if it was legal for her to drink in Mexico, (which we both know she already knew it was, and was probably plotting for MONTHS, lol), waiting to see my feedback before she ordered a drink. Thankfully for her, I was okay with that, and so she and I enjoyed our first alcoholic drink together. (Quite the bonding moment for our somewhat white-trash upbringing, LOL. She’ll be 21 in less than 2 months, but I still felt \”dirty\”, lol).

We crossed the border in Mexicali, and then made a beeline for the highway that connects San Felipe and Sonata. We were headed to Mike’s Sky Ranch, which is a staple along the Baja 1000 route, evidently. (Click here for photos). After a fantastic meal and a wonderful night there, we headed to San Felipe, and had fish tacos for lunch by the beach, while we waited for the last of our Compadres, Woody, to join us, Delayed due to fuel pump problems on his way down from Reno, he was not able to meet us at the border and cross with us. Once we were all together, we headed South, which is when the fun began!

From San Felipe, we took a dirt highway south, and ended up staying the night at a beautiful beach campsite on Gonzaga Bay. Though absolutely beautiful, it was extremely difficult for me to imagine living in, if I was anything other than a professional fisherman. I’m sure their tourism business booms during the Baja 1000, but the rest of the year…not so much…which was evident from the poverty. Don’t get me wrong…this place was no different…the entire way down we saw poverty…then even worse poverty…then unbelievable poverty. If ever you are feeling down on yourself, your luck, or your place in life, take a trip south of the border for a few days and see how some other folks live who were not nearly as fortunate to have been born in America. Air-conditioning was almost unheard of, electricity that did NOT come from a generator was a luxury, and running water was extremely iffy. We visited more pit toilets and porta-potty is than we care to remember, due to lack of running water. and, we didn’t have to go halfway around the world find it. This is literally our next-door neighbor. It’s unbelievable how different our governments are, and how different the surroundings are as a result.

From Gonzaga Bay, we took another portion of the Baja 1000 route, complete with lots of potholes and whoop-de-doos, and ended up on Mexican Highway 1. Turning Southeast, and then took The cut-off via Mexican 12, headed back to the Gulf of California, all the way to Bahia de Los Angeles, where we spent the night, camping on a beautiful beach, once again. Life is rough, huh?

The next day, we took \”Mexico 5\”, which sounds like it’s supposed to be a highway, but turns out it’s another ungraded dirt and gravel road (and also part of the Baja 1000 route, which I supposed makes sense) toward Coco’s Corner. After about an hour of driving, we encountered one hell of a rainstorm. We were on flat ground, so at least we worn in a valley, however the rain had fallen so quickly and for so long, that we needed to stop and see what was going to happen with the road. We could make it back to town if we needed to, but we needed to press on as soon as we knew it was safe. After eating lunch at our jeeps, parked in the middle of the dirt highway, and allowing the rain to seize finally after about an hour, we pressed on, slogging through mud and swap. Thankfully, the soil is fairly sandy, so the mud was not terribly deep.

Even including this crazy rainstorm we waited out, the most unbelievable thing that happened all day, happened after the rainstorm: we passed an oncoming Toyota Corolla on the way to Coco’s Corner! That’s right…a couple in a Toyota rental car, obviously WAY outside of their preparations for the trip. They’ve used up, nor as for help, and though we were all staring at him incredulously, they seem to be just fine without assistance, weaving their way between rocks and across washouts.

Because I liked his description so much, I’m going to use a quote from Sam (one of our compadres on the trip) who wrote in his trip report, \”…we arrived at Coco’s corner. Coco is one of those mystical characters who has lived most of his life in the outback of Baja. Now a double amputee, he still gets along with the generosity of others. His site is always on the Baja 1000 run. We stopped for about an hour, spoke with Coco. Had his free Coke and beer and got him to put a JeepExpeditions.org card on his wall.\” I couldn’t have said it better myself. Coco was a an extremely interesting character! He told us that the Corolla we passed had been driven north by some tourists not knowing what they were getting into, and that they actually stayed overnight there the night previous, because they were stranded, not able to drive more than 10mph down the roads which we, in Jeeps, were only able to average around 20 mph or so. bear in mind that the only place you can sleep at Coco’s corner, is a few old, rundown campers and trailers that have been long since abandoned by their previous owners. And, just for a little added excitement for this poor couple, Coco caught the scorpion you see in the photos, while they were having dinner. Talk about culture shock for these guys, lol.

Leaving Coco’s, we took \”Mexico 3\”, which included lots and lots and lots of washboard miles before we would see pavement again. After we finally arrived back on Mexico 1, headed to Punta San Francisquito, where once again we were able to pick a fantastically beautiful spot to camp on the beach. Mexico may not have elaborate hotels everywhere you go, but damn right they have some beautiful beaches. Camping on the beach was a new experience for me, and Ally too…that’s not something that we can do frequently in The States, so far as I have ever been.

Upon waking up in the morning, taking a walk on the beach and collecting sea shells, then fixing a quick breakfast, we headed out of town, on our way to Santa Rosalia, which is a quaint little mining town that was originally settled by the French. You could tell, by the architecture, that we were in a very different place. Buildings looked more Colonial, or European, than anything else we had been seeing on the trip. Truly a very pretty place! After having a late lunch there, we pressed on to Mulege, where we set up camp, in the mud, and got rained on that night. We were catching the tail end of the tropical storm that was blowing from Pacific to the Gulf, and thankfully this was as bad as it got this night…we’d had enough \”torrential downpour\” to last us!

We worked our way down from small, dusty town to small, dusty town, southeastward down the peninsula, with the headings set for our ultimate destination, Cabo San Lucas. When we arrived, we were pleasantly surprised about how modern the city was. Roughing it in rustic conditions, and camping out for a week in a row, had taken its toll on me, at least, and I was very much looking forward to the three-bedroom luxury condo we rented, with a beautiful patio overlooking the ocean.

As part of the trip planning, we had proposed a \”zero day\”, in which we would do laundry, kick back, drink some beer, have some nice meals, and not worry about driving, packing, unpacking, and filling the tank. Ross, Ally, and myself decided to do a little snorkeling, and had a great time at Punto Gorda. it was Ally’s first-time snorkeling, so it was exciting to experience that with her. I love my girl! Even if she’s not excited about experiencing something new, or something she’s had apprehension about, she still goes with the flow, and gives it a shot. Kudos, Ally!

We headed into downtown Cabo San Lucas that evening for dinner, and Ally and I had a margarita at the quasi-Famous, Cabo Wabo Cantina, owned (and marketed) by Sammy Hagar, of Montrose and Van Halen fame. (insert Hagar/Roth grudge match here). I’ve gotta say, it was the best margarita I had had all trip, which was ironic, because we ate in some pretty authentic places, lol. While we were downtown at the waterfront, we also had a water taxi take us out to \”Land’s End\”, which is the furthest most point South on the Baja Peninsula. We got some great photos of the waves crashing against the whole the rock, which you’ll see in the photos.

Being the fact that we took our time getting down to, San Lucas, retracing the Baja 1000 routes, we knew that we needed to step up the pace in order to get home on Sunday. So, we headed out of Cabo San Lucas northward, through Todos Santos, and drove nearly 10 hours to get to Loreto for the night. We stayed at a somewhat creepy hotel, which I’m sure, in its day, used to be quite nice, but looked as if it had not been repaired externally for many decades. Thankfully, the rooms were clean, and there was running water, which in many places, is a luxury, as I’ve mentioned before, LOL. Are you starting to see a trend here?

From Loreto, we took another sprint northward, driving to Guerrero Negro, but realizing that wouldn’t put us close enough to the border in order to hit our goal of crossing the border on Saturday afternoon, so we decided to push through, and get some more driving hours in before we quit for the day. We also wanted to see the Mission at San Ignacio, due to a strong recommendation from a Californian who had been racing Baja for 20+ years, who we bumped into in San Carlos. I am extremely grateful we decided to, because this was the most beautiful mission (and city square) we had come across during the whole entire trip!

That resulted in us needing to drive after sun had set, which is not recommended in Mexico, and I’m not sure that we had a really solid idea as to why this was the case, up until this night. The reason is, the paved roads are not in good shape, the road is extremely narrow and winding, and there are semi trucks traveling quickly in both directions all night long…this is a MAJOR truck route. And, the trucks share the center line. here’s what I mean by that: So they don’t put a wheel off the right-hand shoulder, they stay toward the center of each lane. When semi’s pass each other, it’s a bit of a dance, and their mirrors come really close to touching at 50+ miles an hour. When they’re passing oncoming cars, however, they frequently do NOT move over to the shoulder, and crowd the centerline…so, to avoid getting crushed by a semi, cars are forced to slow down and swerve over to allow the semi he get by you safely. To say we literally took our life is in our hands this night, would certainly be appropriate. However, our accommodations that night in Santa Rosario were fantastic. The hotel we stayed in was extremely modern, recently refurbished, and probably a $150 a night hotel if it were in anywhere other than Baja California peninsula. I think we paid around $40 for it, unbelievably. To say tourism is down, is an understatement.

After a wholesome breakfast at another Baja 1000 staple, Mama Espinosa’s, we headed up the coast toward Ensenada. Thankfully, the roads were much better, and we were able to make Ensenada a little after lunch time. there was a large resort right next door to our accommodations in Ensenada, so we headed over there and had a fantastic dinner as we watched the sunset over the Pacific Ocean, and excellent service to boot. I highly recommend the orange Grove Hotel if you’re in Ensenada, and looking for a place to stay a few nights…extremely comfortably.

The next morning, we got up, and went BACK to the resort, had a beautiful breakfast, and headed off to Tecate, to cross the border, and get on our way back home. We had been gone 13 days at this point, it definitely felt like home was calling. Ally and I swapped driving responsibilities all trip, so we trucked home through Yuma, Sierra Vista, and Buckeye, getting home around 8 PM.

In short, a fantastic trip, and thankfully without any incident whatsoever. I know that there’s a lot of talk about safety south of the border, but frankly, I’m not sure why. The areas we were in, which obviously is off the mainland, seem to have nothing but helpful, friendly people, great tasting food, inexpensive accommodations, lots of options for camping, and even with the really bad highways, a great experience!

Knowing that you are not able to take firearms illegally into Mexico, I was apprehensive at first, so I purchased a couple of large machetes, (which could be passed off as off-road tools), to clear the path. I figured if we ever needed to explain them away, a little bit of dirt in some chunks missing out of them would show that this was not a weapon, it was an agricultural tool. Even through all the military checkpoints, we were not questioned once. I took the stance of humor, every time I needed to talk with somebody and Spanish, because I knew my Spanish was not good enough to really get my point across clearly. I figured, at least if they realize that I’m okay with laughing at myself, perhaps they’ll laugh along, and help me anyway. That stance worked for us the entire trip. My Spanish got much better…don’t get me wrong…and I really would love to learn the language in full, but I was able to get help every single time I needed it, which was great.

I woke up the next morning, extremely grateful for my life, as it currently is. I think that we get caught up sometimes in our problems, and we don’t frequently focus on the things we actually have, which could be considered gigantic positives by someone in a different country. Without travel, I really don’t feel as if we’re able to expand our minds fully, and understand what we truly have. Sometimes it’s tough to be grateful, when you don’t know what you have, compared to the rest of the world. Let me tell you, Mexico was definitely an education for me. I’m currently considering how I can help, in some way, shape, or form, to help promote some changes down there.let me know if you know of any organizations that are currently doing work to improve the infrastructure in Mexico, will you please e-mail me?I feel like I want to get involved.

-Kevin (and Ally)

PS: If you haven’t yet gotten enough of Baja California, one of our fellow Jeepers on the trip, Sam W, (as seen in the photos driving the dark blue Unlimited), did an extremely detailed write up, including waypoints, and restaurant reviews, which I posted the links to below.

Oct 19th Website Update, an APOLOGY, and a Special Offer…

Video Update Link if video doesn’t load

(copy and paste this link into your browser: http://youtu.be/6Y-GKwrbl08 )

Just checking in with a little update of what’s going on over here.

I’m happy to announce we a new website that were going to be releasing on Wednesday of this next week but before I get to that just wanted to apologize. As part of our moving over to our new server (the old server kept going down) we were down like 3 and a half days in September, I think, altogether with stupid errors that that we were just not able to resolve with the past host, so we moved to a new host.

As part of that, unfortunately, my programmers didn’t quite get the mail settings right and so our mail was down from, I think real early Friday to real late on Monday, so if you sent us an e-mail between Friday and Monday (maybe even Thursday night inclusive) do me a favor if you haven’t gotten a response yet, go ahead and resend that to sales@kevinsoffroad.com if you would. That’s the best address for us and we’ll be able to respond back fairly quickly. We’re still getting caught up from a big mess that was created as a result of that, and I want to apologize and put my money where my mouth is here. I’m going to send out an e-mail to everybody and basically let them know that I’m going to put a $20 credit on file for each of you…anybody that’s looking for some additional items right now…I’m going to put a $20 coupon code on there. No minimum order or anything like that…it’s just kind of an apology as far as us not being prepared and ready for e-mails unfortunately. My programmers didn’t get the job done perfectly, so anyhow…on to the good news. The good news is the brand-new website will be launched mid-point this next week. I’m really excited about that! It’s October 19th, today, so it should be released about Wednesday or Thursday of this next week, and it’s going to be a lot easier to find things, it’s going to be a lot prettier, and these guys (the programmers) have a really done a good job on almost everything that they’ve done, so I don’t want to give them too much of a hard time…I’m pretty happy with everything else but, anyway, keep your eyes open for that and I guess that’s about it.

Anyway, I will shoot out an e-mail to everybody, and let them know what’s going on. I just wanted to let everybody know that I promise we’re not ignoring…we didn’t delete your message, or anything like that, lol…we just simply didn’t get it, unfortunately.

Anyway, take great care, thanks for checking in, and I look forward to chatting with you soon!

Swedish “Car and Driver” run the Jeep Grand Cherokee Moose Test AGAIN…same results!

Jeep Grand Cherokee Moose Test Part II

August 2, 2012

Wow…this is not good for Jeep.

So, the back-story is that Teknikens Varld, a Swedish Car Enthusiast Magazine, does an “Elk Test”, on every vehicle they review. Unfortunately, the 2012 Jeep Grand Cherokee they tested, did really poorly.

Jeep got defensive, and started their PR machine up…talking about how it was overloaded, test wasn’t done right…it was impossible…and all. I wonder what they are going to say about THIS:

Video on YouTube: Jeep Grand Cherokee moose test part II: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zaYFLb8WMGM

Wow…bad. Really bad. 7 blown tires??? Wheels off the road??!!

Wonder how Jeep is going to respond. In other news today, Jeep evidently raised the price of the Jeep Grand Cherokee by over $5k…and now it’s nearly $60k for a fully decked one. Perhaps it’s to pay off the PR team they are going to hire, to spin their safety record, lol.

As you know, I’m a huge fan of the Jeep Grand Cherokee…I hope they can pull out of this nose-dive easily, and mostly unscathed!

Blitz USA (Gas Can Manufacturers) Chapter 11…Thanks to Ambulance-chasing lawyers!

Blitz USA
Blitz USA Gas Can
Blitz USA goes bankrupt!?? Open for comments below…what do you think of this craziness??

Like 19th century marauders, the trial bar attacks any business it thinks will cough up money in its raids. The latest victims are the people who make those red plastic gasoline cans.

Until recently, Blitz USA—the nation’s No. 1 consumer gasoline-can producer, based in Miami, Oklahoma—was doing fine. It’s a commoditized, low-margin business, but it’s steady. Sales normally pick up when hurricane season begins and people start storing fuel for back-up generators and the like.

Blitz USA has controlled some 75% of the U.S. market for plastic gas cans, employing 117 people in that business, and had revenues of $60 million in 2011. The Consumer Product Safety Commission has never deemed Blitz’s products unsafe.

Then the trial attorneys hit on an idea with trial-lawyer logic: They could sue Blitz when someone poured gas on a fire (for instance, to rekindle the flame) and the can exploded, alleging that the explosion is the result of defects in the can’s design as opposed to simple misuse of the product. Plaintiffs were burned, and in some cases people died.

Blitz’s insurance company would estimate the cost of years of legal battles and more often than not settle the case, sometimes for millions of dollars. But the lawsuits started flooding in last year after a few big payouts. Blitz paid around $30 million to defend itself, a substantial sum for a small company. Of course, Blitz’s product liability insurance costs spiked.

In June, Blitz filed for bankruptcy. All 117 employees will lose their jobs and the company—one of the town’s biggest employers—will shutter its doors. Small business owners have been peppering the local chamber of commerce with questions about the secondary impact on their livelihoods.

The tort-lawsuit riders leading the assault on Blitz included attorneys Hank Anderson of Wichita Falls, Texas; Diane Breneman of Kansas City, Missouri; and Terry Richardson of Barnwell, South Carolina. All told, they’ve been involved in more than 30 lawsuits against Blitz in recent years.

The rest of the plastic-can industry can’t be far behind, so long as there’s any cash flow available. The American Association for Justice’s (formerly the Association of Trial Lawyers of America) annual conference in Chicago this month will feature, with a straight face, a meeting of the “gas cans litigation group.”

The Atlantic hurricane season started June 1, and Blitz estimates that demand for plastic gas cans rises 30% about then. If consumers can’t find the familiar red plastic can, fuel will have to be carried around in heavy metal containers or ad-hoc in dangerous alternatives, such as coolers.

Trial lawyers remain a primary funding source for the Democratic Party, but stories like this cry out for a bipartisan counter-offensive against these destructive raids that loot law-abiding companies merely because our insane tort laws make them vulnerable.

A version of this article appeared July 23, 2012, on page A12 in the U.S. edition of The Wall Street Journal, with the headline: The Tort Bar Burns On.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304765304577482620929586962.html

Grand Slam West 2012 Moab, Utah Trip

The annual trip to Utah for Grand Slam West, which is held in Moab every year, was more fun this year than ever. Not only did we have a great turn out, we had a really, really fun bunch of people all getting together, and, as normal, but prices were amazing! Here are some photos of our excursion to Moab, and some photos from the trails as well.

This annual adventure is a hell of a lot of fun, and if you have a Grand Cherokee, I highly recommend you schedule it for the first week of June for next year. The people are amazing, the trails are amazing, and everybody has SUCH a great time. I’ve been going since the second year, in 1999, and have developed some amazing friendships as a result of our yearly trip up there.

Typically, we arrive on a Wednesday, and run trails Thursday, Friday, and Saturday. Others stick around (like myself) until early the next week afterwards, running additional trails as time allows. One of the best trails up there, in my opinion, is Hells Revenge, which begins just a few miles East of Moab. That trail is the quintessential Moab off-road trail, and it’s a must do,
you’re up there.

There are also stay in, or campgrounds you can stay at, dependent upon your preference. Can you let the campground is right in the center of town, and convenient to everything. This time, I took along my expedition trailer, and we stated Canyonlands Campground, getting use out of the tent trailer. It worked out great, and I’m glad I built. There will be another blog post about it in the future.

Again, if you have a Grand Cherokee, get yourself to Moab for the grand slam West event!

For more information about Grand Slam West, and other Grand Cherokee specific events nationwide, go toor

And, here are some additional Photos of

Here is our YouTube video of our Photos from Grand Slam West 2012

Project “Dark Horse” – 2004 WJ Grand Cherokee Overland build thread

We did an entire transformation on this beautiful 2004 WJ Grand Cherokee Overland Build in late 2010 at KOR, and we are really, really happy with the results.  Our customer was very specific about some of the parts he wanted to be included. He was building his Grand Cherokee to be a “one and done” rig…something he could build one time, and not have to continuously fiddle with. Nothing takes the fun out of a weekend like constantly adjusting suspension and equipment. He wanted an extremely capable rig, which he could be really proud of, and was fully capable to take him from trail head to end without any problems. What he ended up with was a VERY nice rig…a real work of art.

Marc was out in Anza Borrego when he shot this great photo you see below, while out wheeling it like it was built for…not tenderfooting around forest roads. More photos are available on our website about his build.

WJ Grand Cherokee Overland
2004 WJ Grand Cherokee Overland

Here’s a video on part of what went into the build…

Here’s a partial list of what went into this WJ Grand Cherokee Overland build:

Grand Cherokee Bumpers for 1993>1998 ZJ Grand Cherokees

Have you been looking for a unique set of bumpers for your

ZJ Grand Cherokee?  We have what might possibly be the best

Grand Cherokee bumpers on the market.  I don’t say that to brag…I have

actually beat both the ZJ tube-type prerunner-style bumper AND the plate

steel ZJ Stealth-style bumper mercilessly on the rocks over the last five

years, and have had no issues whatsoever, other than scratched powdercoating. 

  These ZJ Grand Cherokee bumpers are built

to the Extreme: rock-bashable, high-clearance, and

the fronts allows the mounting of a winch.  Protect the front and rear of your

Grand Cherokee from a

disaster with a rock or tree today.  Our ZJ Grand Cherokee

bumpers are CAD designed

for us, are bent out of THICK 3/16" plate steel, (which is 50% thicker

than most bumpers on the market), built with some of the best

machinery available on the market.  They are mounted

with the VERY BEST mounting system available, which sandwiches

the weak unibody framerails on top and bottom, rather than how

other aftermarket bumpers are made, mostly to reduce cost, I

expect.

We keep the weight

down, too: 100lbs average, and even holds a 15k rated winch. 

  Shipping is via Truck

Freight (too large to go via UPS), and ranges from $125 to $250 depending on how close

to Phoenix, AZ you are.  We’d rather ship to your business,

as there is a $70 residential

surcharge if you have us ship it to a house rather than a

zoned-business address. 

Light tabs can be drilled and

mounted in the front section, but is discouraged due to

the turbulence the lights will create, possibly causing your Jeep to overheat in

some instances. 

A note

from Kevin about front and rear bumpers and rear tire

carrier design…

When

deciding on a Grand Cherokee bumper for your Jeep ZJ make sure that you take

into account some of the unforeseen issues. 

1)

Does the

tire carrier hold the tire in a way to reduce blind spots

and maximize visibility out the rear?  Our carrier mounts on the driver’s side, in your natural blind-spot,

so that you can see both over your right shoulder AND still

see out the rear view mirror, which is mostly impossible

with nearly all other Grand Cherokee tire carriers on the market who put the

carrier in the middle or to the right of the rear window.

2)

How is the tire carrier mounted?  Can it withstand a

washboard road with the weight of a 35" tire on a steel

wheel mounted on it?  That’s up to 150lbs in some

cases…just rattling around back there on the bumper!  Our tire carrier uses a patented

cam-latch,

which utilizes an easy-to-open lever which puts constant

tension on the latch and hasp assembly which completely

eliminates rattles from

your carrier.  And, you can

actually lift the entire rear end of the Jeep off the ground

with a forklift from OUR tire carrier…how’s that for

strong?

3) What

sort of hinge is included?  Our ZJ bumper uses twin 3/4" Heim joints, which not only has over 12,000 lbs. of radial load

capability EACH (there are two…that’s 24,000 lbs. total),

but are also easily replaceable if they wear over time, and

you are also able to fine-tune the height of the carrier up and down

by threading the heim joint in and out.  Also, you can

completely remove the carrier from the bumper very easily if

you wanted to. 

4)

Our bumpers are built with 1/4" ultra-thick steel plate in

the center sections (between the frame mounts for added

rigidity) and 3/16" thick steel plate everywhere else, which is

more than 50% thicker than the more well-known brands of

bumper.  Have you ever seen a (well-known brand) front

Grand Cherokee winch

bumper BEND IN THE CENTER during a heavy winch pull?  I

have, with my own eyes, and that’s why we use 1/4" and 3/16" steel with fortified

3/8" thick frame

rail mounts.  This bumper ain’t going ANYWHERE once you

mount it up, winch or no. 

5)

Our ZJ Grand bumpers allow for the

best approach angle and departure angle currently available

in ANY aftermarket Grand Cherokee bumper manufacturer,

’cause that’s how we roll, playa.

6)

Our winch is inserted inside the front

bumper, all the

way down, so as to

not give you overheating problems like some of the other

aftermarket bumpers have been known to cause.

 

D-ring tabs for the stealth ZJ

bumper are a $45.97 upgrade, and I highly recommend them.

Also available are our

Pre-Runner Style bumpers, which are nearly as beefy, but are a

tad lighter.  Click on the images below for a larger photo.

Install Instructions HERE

S/H costs: By Truck

Freight only.  A business with a loading dock

is $60~$80 cheaper than a residence. 

THINK IN BULK:

Buying two bumpers at once reduces your shipping cost by

around 40%. 

Two bumpers on a

pallet only costs about 20% more than a single bumper on a

pallet to the same zip code!

 ALL BUMPERS COME NON-POWDERCOATED. 

Krylon

spray paint works well, and so does POR-15.  Even if

you decide you want professional painting or powdercoating,

you can probably have the bumpers powdercoated AFTER they

arrive locally for less than I can charge you to do them. 

Do some price comparisons before ordering.  Just trying

to save you some money. 

-Kevin-

For Frequently

Asked Questions (FAQ)

about specific details on our bumpers, click

HERE

(all bumpers fit

1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, and 1998 ZJ Grand Cherokees)

HARD-KOR Stealth Front Bumper

for ZJ model Jeep Grand Cherokees

Applications

Retail Price

Kevin’s Price

All ’93>’98 Grand

Cherokees Stealth

Front Bumper (with upper light loop and

stinger)

$989.97

Click Here To Go To Shopping Cart

All ’93>’98 Grand

Cherokees Stealth

Front Bumper (no upper light loop)

$899.97

Click Here To Go To Shopping Cart

Optional D-Ring Welded Shackle

Mounts (pair)

$59.97

Click Here To Go To Shopping Cart

Optional D-Ring Shackles

(pair)

$21.97

Click Here To Go To Shopping Cart

HARD-KOR Stealth Rear Bumper

for ZJ model Jeep Grand Cherokees

Applications

Retail Price

Kevin’s Price

All ’93>’98 Grand

Cherokees Stealth

Rear Bumper w/o tire carrier

$789.97

Click Here To Go To Shopping Cart

All ’93>’98 Grand

Cherokees Stealth

Rear Bumper with tire carrier

$1099.97

Click Here To Go To Shopping Cart

Optional D-Ring Welded Shackle

Mounts (pair)

$59.97

Click Here To Go To Shopping Cart

Optional D-Ring Shackles

(pair)

$21.97

Click Here To Go To Shopping Cart

Tube-Style Front PreRunner Bumper

for ZJ model Jeep Grand Cherokees

Applications

Retail Price

Kevin’s Price

All ’93>’98 Grand

Cherokees Pre-Runner with Winch Mount

w/ upper light loop and stinger

$807.97

Click Here To Go To Shopping Cart

All ’93>’98 Grand

Cherokees Pre-Runner with Winch Mount

w/o upper light loop and stinger

$669.97

Click Here To Go To Shopping Cart

Tube-Style Rear PreRunner Bumper

for ZJ model Jeep Grand Cherokees

td width=”323″ align=”center” style=”font-family: Arial”>

All ’93>’98 Grand

Cherokees Pre-Runner rear with tire

carrier

$862.97

Click Here To Go To Shopping Cart

All ’93>’98 Grand

Cherokees Pre-Runner rear w/o tire

carrier

$588.97

Click Here To Go To Shopping Cart

All

information provided herein � 2010 KevinsOffroad.com. All rights reserved.

"Jeep" is a registered trademark of the Chrysler Company.

Customer Marc L.’s Jeep Grand Cherokee WJ Long Arm Lift Kit

Jeep Grand Cherokee WJ Long Arm Lift Kit – Customer Marc L.

Kevin and staff:
Here’s some pics of “The Dark Horse” playing a little; this is out in Tierra Del Sol, between San Diego and Phoenix just north of I-8. The views are spectacular. (That’s why I do this, to get out there and experience mother nature and have a little fun.)

Again I didn’t do anything too outrageous – the broken axle on the TJ reminded me that this is still my Daily Driver! NOTE: the Dark Horse sailed over those concrete pipes, cleared them by about ¼”, all the other TJ’s, JK’s hung up and had to bump themselves over.

Love my rig.

Have fun out there.

Later,
Marc


Jeep Grand Cherokee WJ Long Arm Lift Kit
Marc clears the pipes, no problem


Marc:
I absolutely love your rig. There are not many WJ Jeep Grand Cherokees with the same setup, and none that I’ve seen that are as clean as yours is!! I love it! If you ever decide to sell it, let me know…I want it back! :-) – Kevin

NOTE FROM KEVIN: And, here’s where you guys can get your own Jeep Grand Cherokee WJ Long Arm Lift Kit. We run the Clayton Long Arm Kit on our shop WJ, and I absolutely *LOVE* the ride quality of the Clayton long arms, as well as the “set it and forget it” install…there isn’t any constant maintenance needed. Just some lube every time you get an oil change, after it’s set up, and that’s it! I highly recommend one, if you’re interested in the best ride quality for a lifted Jeep Grand Cherokee you can buy. Match is up with some ProComp MX6 shocks (or Bilstein 5100s) and you’re going to have an AMAZING ride, AMAZING flex, and outstanding traction as your WJ articulates over things that would stop most Wranglers! It’s well worth the price…hands down!

Pinging or Detonation with the Grand Cherokee 5.9 Limited

 Pinging or Detonation with the Grand Cherokee 5.9 Limited:

Most of this information also applies to the standard 5.2L, and some
can be applied to any engine.

By: Scott Mueller <mailto:scottmueller@compuserve.com>

Q: I have a 1998 Jeep GC 5.9 Limited with about 20k and it started
pinging under load, especially in higher altitudes. Is there a fix?

A: Yes, there are several possible fixes which I’ll outline in this
article.

First, some background: The GC 5.9L has a special premium fuel
computer calibration stock which has a full 15 degrees *more* spark
advance than Chrysler’s other calibrations for 5.2L and 5.9L trucks.
This mandates a minimum of 91 octane premium fuel. Spark advance is
further increased if you run the Mopar Performance replacement
computer, which increases the octane requirement to 92 octane minimum.

If you find the pinging only in high altitude environments, it may be
due to problems with the gasoline you are using. The gas you find at
the local pumps in high altitude areas will have reduced octane
ratings because in general the need for higher octane is reduced due
to the altitude (lower air pressure = less cylinder pressure = less
octane needed).

Unfortunately this can be a problem if you fuel up with this
low-octane gas and then drive to a lower altitude, or experience
higher temperatures which need a higher octane to prevent detonation.
In other words you may have difficulty finding high enough octane fuel
depending on where and what brand you purchase. For example, the
octane of “premium” fuel sold at higher altitudes will be much less
than the 93 octane I can purchase where I live in Chicago. Be sure
you are really getting a high enough octane fuel when you fill up.

In researching this problem I found several TSBs (Technical Service
Bulletins) from Chrysler related to detonation (knocking or pinging)
on Grand Cherokees.

The most important and easiest one to implement relates to spark plug
wires and their routing:

TSB NO: 18-48-98
DATE: December 30, 1998
SUMMARY: Ignition System Cross Fire/Secondary Ignition Wire Induction

This bulletin relates to cross-fire in the ignition and coil wires,
which can cause detonation and misfires. According to Chrysler, this
rerouting procedure should be performed before any other misfire,
surge, or spark knock repairs are attempted. The repair procedure
involves rerouting the coil wires and/or the plug wires to minimize
induction effects. You can see this TSB at:
<http://dodgeram.com/technical/tsb98/18_48_98/18_48_98_v8.htm>

———-

If after rerouting the plug wires you still have problems, and
especially if you’ve noticed excessive oil consumption, then you
should check the following TSB:

TSB NO: 09-05-00
DATE: 02/00
MODEL: All ZJ or ZJ (export) Grand Cherokee w/5.2L or 5.9L gas engines
SUMMARY: Engine knock and engine oil consumption due to intake manifold pan
gasket oil leak.

This bulletin relates to an oil leak through the intake manifold
which allows oil to be burned, causing excessive carbon deposits
which cause detonation. You can see a copy of this TSB at
<http://dodgeram.com/technical/TSB00/09-05-00.htm>. In the TSB is
detailed a procedure to check whether the intake is properly sealed
or not.

———-

If your intake manifold seal is good, and the detonation you are
noticing has increased gradually over time, it is usually caused by
carbon deposits in the combustion chamber. This can happen in any
vehicle of course, but the 5.9L is perhaps more sensitive to this due
to the increased spark advance it runs, as would be any other high
performance engine.

The solution is of course to eliminate the carbon from the combustion
chambers. For this I recommend you use what is known as a “Top Engine
Cleaner” which is a chemical you either pour or spray into the
intake, or in some cases add to the fuel, to clean the combustion
chambers and valves of carbon deposits. Chrysler’s version of a Top
Engine Cleaner is the “Mopar Combustion Chamber Conditioner referred
to above. I’ve even used distilled water for this purpose, although
it’s not quite as effective.

Some of the better fuel injector cleaner type additives such as
Techron are also designed to reduce or eliminate combustion chamber
deposits, but they don’t work as quickly as the Top Engine Cleaner.
That’s what Chrysler refers to as “Mopar Fuel Injector Clean Up” in
the above TSB. They also have a product called “Mopar Fuel Injector
Cleaner” which is p/n 4318007 that performs a similar duty.

Here are several sites with instructions on how to use a Top Engine Cleaner
to rid an engine of combustion deposits.
<http://www.gnttype.org/techarea/maintenance/cleaner.html>
<http://www.shotimes.com/SHO3decarbon.html>
<http://www.miata.net/garage/tsb/s004_93.html> Although these sites describe
procedures for specific automobiles, the procedures would be similar for all
fuel injected or carbureted engines.

There is a factory TSB that relates to this as well:

TSB NO: 14-08-97
GROUP: Fuel
DATE: DEC. 21,1997
SUBJECT: Poor Drivability With High DI (Drivability Index) Fuel

You can see this one at:
<http://www.dodgeram.com/technical/TSB97/14_08_97.HTM> or
<http://neons.org/neontsb/TSB/14/140897.htm>

The pertinant info from this TSB is:

“If a vehicle is experiencing heavy spark knock on gasoline with its
designed octane rating, this may be an indication of excessive
combustion chamber deposits, or some other problem. Combustion
chamber deposits can be removed with Mopar Combustion Chamber
Conditioner p/n 04318001.”

“if fuel injector or intake valve deposits are suspected of
contributing to poor performance, occasional use of Mopar Fuel
Injector Clean Up p/n 04549613 is a much less expensive way to
maintain engine cleanliness than regular use of premium gasoline.”

———-

Finally, if you want another way around the problem, and/or don’t
want to use premium fuel in the 5.9 Limited, then check out the
following TSB:

TSB NO: 18-28-97
GROUP: Vehicle Performance
DATE: Aug. 29, 1997
MODELS: 1998 (ZJ) Grand Cherokee
SUBJECT: Premium Unleaded/Regular Unleaded Fuel Selection
NOTE: This information applies to 5.9L engines

DISCUSSION:

“The 1998 5.9L Grand Cherokee was designed to use Premium Unleaded
fuel. This selection was made to maximize the horsepower and torque
from the engine. Some customers may prefer using Regular Unleaded
fuel due to cost factors associated with using premium. If a customer
prefers using regular fuel, the software of the powertrain control
module will require flash programming to prevent drivability
concerns. The regular fuel calibration will reduce engine horsepower
and torque.”

“This flash program procedure will allow a technician to select
either a premium fuel calibration or a regular fuel calibration.
These calibrations can be re-flashed from one to the other at any
time.”

The bulletin goes on to describe the procedure for re-flashing.

———

OK here are my bottom line recommendations to solve the pinging
problem:

1.) First things first, make sure you are really using premium (91
octane or higher) fuel.

2.) Reroute your ignition wires as indicated by TSB 18-48-98.

3.) Test your intake manifold gasket seal as indicated in TSB
09-05-00. If the seal is bad then replace the intake manifold gaskets
replaced as indicated in the TSB. If you have the dealer do this, You
may also want to have them check for any misfire trouble codes, which
may indicate other ignition related problems.

4.) Clean your combustion chambers with the “Mopar Combustion Chamber
Conditioner” (Top Engine Cleaner) listed above. You can also use the
“Mopar Fuel Injector Clean Up”, “Mopar Fuel Injector Cleaner” or
something similar in a tankful of gas, although that will be less
effective than the top engine cleaner. The gas treatment products can
then be added to a tank now and then to control or eliminate future
deposits.

5.) One of the *best* tips I can give is to recommend installing a
180 degree thermostat (stock is 195). This not only allows for
slightly more power production, but it will reduce the tendency to
detonate as well. I recommend the Stant “SuperStat” thermostat, which
is a high performance stainless steel version much better than the
stock unit. The Stant part number is 65358 for the 180 degree unit,
and they cost only $4.59 each at most parts stores like Trak, Pep
Boys, Western Auto, etc. Be aware that JET sells this same thermostat
for close to $20 if you feel like paying too much. <g> The thermostat
is very easy to change, especially if you are also doing a coolant
drain and refill at the same time (which should be done annually
anyway). For coolant I recommend the orange DexCool type (available
from Prestone and others), which although is rated for 5 years or
100K miles (or more), should still be changed *every year*. Dilute
with *distilled* water in a 50/50 mix for reduced corrosion.

6.) If after all this you still have a detonation problem, then you
may want to consider going with the 5.9L regular fuel calibration as
indicated by TSB 18-28-97. I’d consider this as a *last resort*
because you’ll end up losing some of the power and torque you bought
the 5.9 Limited for in the first place!

I hope this helps, and if so I’d appreciate any feedback on what
worked or didn’t work. Thanks, Scott.

Modifications I’ve made to my ’98 Grand Cherokee 5.9 Limited

Modifications I’ve made to my ’98 Grand Cherokee 5.9 Limited:
By: Scott Mueller

Performance Mods:

-Mopar Performance PCM p/n P4876898 (’98 Federal Emissions)
-Extrude Honed/Jet Hot coated exhaust manifolds
-Jet Hot coated Y-pipe
-Jet Hot coated “off-road” (cat delete) pipe
-Casper’s downstream O2 sensor simulator
-180 degree thermostat
-DexCool long life coolant
-25% under drive steel crank pulley, shorter belt
-Fastman 50mm ported factory throttle body
-Don-a-Vee 5/8″ throttle body inlet spacer, Jet Hot coated
-K&N air filter w/drilled lower air box
-UpCountry suspension springs and jounce bumper spacers
-Addco front/rear swaybars (larger diameter than stock)
-Energy Suspension greasable swaybar bushings
-Air Lift bags in the rear springs (for level adjustment while towing)
-Sachs UpCountry shocks
-Synthetic fluids (engine, xfer case, trans, fr and rr diff)
-Factory auxiliary transmission cooler
-Power steering cooler (using factory 6cyl trans cooler)
-Aluminum finned front diff. cover (holds more fluid, better cooling)

Accessory/Appearance Mods:

-Factory export E-code headlamps (far superior to US headlamps)
-Narva 90/100w H4 headlight bulbs
-Painless Wiring headlight harness w/dual Bosch 40-amp relays
-Modified fog lights to operate with high beam headlights
-Dichroic (coated) 55w yellow H3 fog light bulbs
-Converted front turn signals to dual filament (running light) operation
-Brighter (higher output) tail, backup and side marker bulbs
-Tekonsha trailer brake controller (connected to factory trailer wiring)
-Polyurethane clear coated undercarriage (corrosion protection)
-Harada FM antenna preamp (pulls in more stations, better stereo)
-Painted 5.9 grille inserts semi gloss black
-Chrome front tow hooks (Reese) on factory brackets

Email me (address above) if you have any questions about any of these
mods. Scott.

249 to 242 Swap, by Wes (Solitude)


NP249 :
NP242 Conversion
Written By: Brian Wesley
Free
AKA: “SOLITUDE”

TOOLS NEEDED:
#1 Screw Extractor (It’s a type of “Easy Out”)
10″ Monkey Wrench
8mm Socket & Crescent Wrench
10mm Socket
13mm Socket
14mm Socket
15mm Socket
18mm Socket & Crescent Wrench
5/32 Punch
9/16 Crescent Wrench (Buy a cheap one, this will be hacked)
9/16 Deep-Well Socket
Crowbar
Flat Head Screw Driver
Phillips Head Screw Driver
Rubber Mallet
Hammer
RTV
Gasket Remover or Razor Blade
Bottle Jack
Jack Stand
NP242
Safety Glasses (Stuff WILL fall in your face & eyes)
Snap Ring Pliers (GOOD ones, Spend some money)
Vise Grips

My 1993 Jeep Grand Cherokee
V8 5.2

BEFORE YOU START:

Do your homework. I tried to make this write-up as conclusive as
possible, but there is probably something I left out. This is
not a factory service manual; do not treat it as such. This is
just from my personal experience. I am not an employee of any
off-road shop, parts distributor or parts manufacturer. I am a
simple off-road enthusiast. This was done in my driveway, by my
friends and me, your shade tree mechanics.

I swapped a NP242 from a 1991 Jeep Cherokee (XJ) into my Jeep
Grand Cherokee (ZJ) with a NP249. The goal of this swap is to
have the following capabilities: 2WD, 4 Part-Time, 4 Full-Time,
neutral, 4-Low. I also wanted to do this swap because the 93-95
NP249 does NOT lock 50/50 in 4-Low. If you have a NVP249 from a
96-98 ZJ it DOES lock 50/50 in 4-Low. To make everything mate
and mesh you have to remove the input gear from your NP249 and
put into your NP242.

STEP ONE:
Safety

Chock your wheels, chock your wheels, chock your wheels. This
means, put something in front and behind your wheels to keep
your Jeep from rolling and moving any direction. Disconnect the
Negative cable from the battery. Get in put it into neutral and
pull the handbrake.

STEP TWO:
Removing the front and rear driveshafts.

The rear is connected to the differential with four(4) 8mm
bolts. Unbolt these, and then slide the driveshaft out of the
tailshaft of the transfer case.




The front driveshaft is connected in two places. Start by
unbolting the four(4) 8mm bolts on the transfer case, then
remove the four(4) 8mm bolts on the differential. Compress the
front driveshaft, and slide it out.


STEP THREE:
Removing the crossmember and supporting the transmission.

Start by supporting the transmission. Using a bottle jack or
floor jack place the top of the jack right behind the
transmission pan.

Remove the four(4) bolts supporting the crossmember.

Remove the bolt running through the bushing that supports the
transmission on the crossmember. After removing the crossmember
support the transmission using the jackstand under the bushing
housing.

STEP FOUR:
Drain the transfer case. This is where your monkey wrench comes
in handy. Notice the plugs.

STEP FIVE:
Removing the transfer case.

Disconnect all the connections to the transfer case. The shifter
linkage (The rod with the plastic bushing. It pushes through)
and the electrical connectors, speedometer and VIC.

There are six(6) bolts holding the transfer case in place. You
can’t miss them. The first five(5) are easy to remove. The sixth
one is on the top passenger side, it is a complete PITA. This is
where your donor 9/16 crescent wrench comes in handy (And some
of my redneck engineering). There is not enough clearance for
you to put a full size 9/16 or even to use a socket. I had to
cut the open end off of the wrench and notch the end to attach a
piece of rope (The wrench ended up being a little longer than
4″. Napa – $3.50 for wrench, $5.00 for some guy to cut it up).
Loop the rope over the case and pull from the driver’s side. It
took both my friend and I to break this nut. (My knots: bowline
on the crescent wrench end and two half hitches on the pipe
wrench end. I didn’t feel like busting it on account of my
knots.)




This will take some effort. You need some muscle for this, or a
really nice jack. I had the muscle and no jack. This takes two
people. Both you and a friend need to wiggle the transfer case
till you clear the bolts. If you have a creeper it will make
things easier for you and him. Remove the case and place it on
the creeper to pull it out from under the Jeep. I didn’t have a
creeper so my friend and I used a thick towel and placed the
case on it to slide it out from under. Have a bucket ready. When
you remove the case, a little transmission fluid will leak out
of the transmission, so be prepared.
THIS CASE WEIGHS ALMOST 100 POUNDS, BE CAREFUL! I bench 225,
this case is very big and awkward to maneuver so make sure you
have everything in place and a plan between you and a friend,
before you try to take it out.

The cases side by side. NP249 Left. NP242 Right. Note: I have
yet to clean up the NP242.


Take a look at the inputs':
NP242




NP249


Before I cleaned up the NP242:


After:

Side-by-Side:

STEP SIX:
Breaking the case.

Start by removing the Speedometer gear so you don’t damage it.



Remove the input seal and housing. It is RTV’ed. Then remove the
snap ring on the input shaft. (Sorry bad picture. It is not the
big obvious snap ring. It’s the smaller one closer to the input
gear.)

Next remove the three(3) bolts holding the back half of the
tailshaft in place. This is also RTV’ed.


Next remove the snap ring completely from the mainshaft.

Remove the four(4) bolts holding the front half of the tailshaft
in place. It’s RTV’ed. Finally you get to pull the tailshaft
off.

The next few pictures are pretty self explanatory.


Now you get to remove the back case half. Remove all the bolts
holding it together. It is RTV’ed. Get out your flat head screw
driver or crowbar. There are two outlets built into this case to
help you break the RTV seal. One on both sides of the case.

Now remove the back case half.

(Take note to where everything is located so you can put it all
back together correctly.)

Remove the chain just like you would on your bike. It’s pretty
simple.

Remove the mainshaft. This is what it should look like to this
point.

Now to remove the shifter assembly (Inside the case). By the
shifter there is a small rubber plug. Remove this plug and use a
#1 screw type extractor to remove the low range shift fork
rollpin. Tap the extractor into the end of the rollpin, and with
vice grips on the extractor pull and twist in a
counterclockwise
direction to remove the rollpin. It may take 2 or three tries to
remove the rollpin. If you cannot get the screw extractor to
“bite”, I had to drill out the rollpin, essentially shredding
the rollpin inside the shaft. Then I punched what was left of it
through with the 5/32 punch. You’re going to have to go pick up
another rollpin if you go this route. Pay special attention to
the flats on the shaft when you remove it so you get it back in
the same way. When you put this back together you’ll need to
reinstall this rollpin.

Give the input a slight tap and:

STEP SEVEN:
Remove the input gear out of the NP249. It’s pretty much the
same process as described above. With a few exceptions.
The tailshaft is one(1) piece on the NP249. This is where to
access the snap ring. And you won’t have to remove the rollpin
on this one.

The input shaft I pulled from the NP242 on the left. Compared to
the input gear that came out of the NP249 which is going
into the NP242.

STEP EIGHT:
Put it all back together in the reverse process with your new
input gear in the NP242. Make sure to clean out the inside of
the NP242 before you put it back together. Clean all the
surfaces with your gasket remover or razor and be very liberal
with your RTV application (LOTS). Make sure to tighten
everything down. Make sure to add one(1) quart of ATF or
Differential Gear Lube to the case before you crank it up. I
chose to use some AMSOil. Good stuff. Adjust your shifter
linkage for the new case and you should be ready to roll!





Hope this helps anyone interested in performing the swap. If you
have any questions don’t hesitate to ask. If you do a swap using
my write-up as reference, please, email me and let me know.

wesleyfree@hotmail.com
. Good luck!

All
information provided herein ‘ 2010 KevinsOffroad.com. All rights reserved.

"Jeep" is a registered trademark of the Chrysler Company.

XJ Cherokee Roof Rack Platform System

To check shipping cost or purchase, please visit the 1995-2001 XJ Cherokee Roof Rack Platform shopping cart page.

 

If you're considering purchasing a XJ Cherokee Roof Rack, but are concerned about the increased height that a typical roof rack requires, we have just the solution for you: Our new Hard-KOR Roof Rack Platform gives you a flat platform that mounts securely to your factory roof rails, and adds only 1.5 inches of increased height, allowing you to park in your garage, or in parking structures, with no problem at all. Here's some of the many benefits to the Hard-KOR Roof Rack Platform:

 

  • Mount some Rubbermaid containers on top, or lash them down with straps and a webbed cargo net for extra storage during long road trips with the family.
  •  

  • Toss your oversized spare tire on the roof, and get it out of the cargo area with the INCLUDED tire mounting plate and hardware.
  •  

  • Mount your roof-top tent (RTT) easily to the Roof Rack Platform, which allows it to be removed more easily than the permanent roof mounts.
  •  

  • Or, for a low-buck RTT option, pitch your current tent on top of the platform, keeping you off the ground, and away from critters.
  •  

  • Removable light bars are available as well, so you can add up to four lights across the front or rear (or both), which can be easily removed.
  •  

  • The entire Roof Rack Platform can be easily removed with 8 nuts, leaving the rail mounts in place, for easy mounting and dismounting
  •  

    To check shipping cost or purchase, please visit the 1999-2004 WJ Grand Cherokee Roof Rack Platform shopping cart page.

     

     

    To check shipping cost or purchase, please visit the 1999-2004 WJ Grand Cherokee Roof Rack Platform shopping cart page.

    WJ Grand Cherokee Roof Rack Platform System

    To check shipping cost or purchase, please visit the 1999-2004 WJ Grand Cherokee Roof Rack Platform shopping cart page.

     

    If you're considering a Roof Rack for your WJ Jeep Grand Cherokee, but are concerned about the increased height that a typical roof rack requires, we have just the solution for you: Our new Hard-KOR Roof Rack Platform gives you a flat platform that mounts securely to your factory roof rails, and adds only 1.5 inches of increased height, allowing you to park in your garage, or in parking structures, with no problem at all. Here's some of the many benefits to the Hard-KOR Roof Rack Platform:

     

  • Mount some Rubbermaid containers on top, or lash them down with straps and a webbed cargo net for extra storage during long road trips with the family.
  •  

  • Toss your oversized spare tire on the roof, and get it out of the cargo area with the INCLUDED tire mounting plate and hardware.
  •  

  • Mount your roof-top tent (RTT) easily to the Roof Rack Platform, which allows it to be removed more easily than the permanent roof mounts.
  •  

  • Or, for a low-buck RTT option, pitch your current tent on top of the platform, keeping you off the ground, and away from critters.
  •  

  • Removable light bars are available as well, so you can add up to four lights across the front or rear (or both), which can be easily removed.
  •  

  • The entire Roof Rack Platform can be easily removed with 8 nuts, leaving the rail mounts in place, for easy mounting and dismounting
  •  

    To check shipping cost or purchase, please visit the 1999-2004 WJ Grand Cherokee Roof Rack Platform shopping cart page.

     

     

    To check shipping cost or purchase, please visit the 1999-2004 WJ Grand Cherokee Roof Rack Platform shopping cart page.

    Grand Cherokee Roof Racks – ZJ & WJ

    Kevin’s Grand Cherokee Roof Racks for ’99-’04 WJ Grand Cherokee and ’93 – ’98 ZJ Grand Cherokee (with partial mesh floor to enjoy your moonroof, or full mesh floor for maximum capacity)

     


     

    Are you looking for a roof rack for your Jeep that looks great and works even better?  I've just released my brand-newly designed, round tube version of the old-fashioned roof utility rack that every Jeep owner needs at one point in time or another.  This this thing is built like no other…sturdy, solid, and lightweight (59 – 68 lbs depending on version).  I've over-built it so that you'll have room for suitcases, Rubbermaid containers, your Hi-Lift jack, spare tire, and whatever else you need to fit up there.  It also offers many exclusive features that no other roof rack does; one being the steel mesh flooring is either left open above the moonroof area to let the sunshine stream in, or a fully-welded mesh floor version is available for those without moonroofs.

    This is the ONLY roof rack on the market built *SPECIFICALLY* to mount on the roof of Jeep Grand Cherokees!  The rest are just generic roof racks, with bolt-on mounts that happen to fit also…they are not racks designed with our fully-welded and integrated Grand Cherokee roof mounts!

     

    See our
    Check out our

    For our

     

    It features four built-in forward-facing light tabs, two built-in rearward facing light tabs, includes an integrated Hi-Lift mount on one side, shovel mount on the other, and an integrated spare tire mount that will accommodate up to a 37" tire up top!  Click HERE to compare features and prices with the other top selling racks on the market.  I currently have a mounting system for all models of WJ and ZJ, and the later model XJs with the newer triangular style roof rails (~'92 and up?). 

     

     

    This rack is EXTREMELY labor intensive to build with it's numerous compound bends and fish-mouthed tube angles, and would run you well over a thousand bucks to replicate it at a local tubing-fab shop IF you already had the mechanical drawings complete (which would cost you several hundred bucks also).  To keep the cost down, I'm running these in batches, so chances are I'll have them in stock when you're ready to order. 

     

     

     Our price INCLUDES mounting hardware to attach it to your factory roof rails at NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE, while some of the other guys charge upwards of $75 for roof mounts (SURE, like you could somehow use the rack WITHOUT mounting it, LOL).  If you compare apples to apples with other racks, I KNOW you'll find that this is an EXTREMELY fair price, carries Kevin's typical reputation for overbuilding, and looks cool and unique enough to get your rig noticed on the trail AND around town.  It's a KevinsOffroad.com exclusive…no one else has anything that looks like this or offers these features, especially at this price.  Dimensions are approximately 73" x 40" x 7" at it's tallest and widest.  It will extend upward about 7" taller than the top of your factory roof rail (without a spare tire mounted on top), and 1" MORE than the WIDTH of the tire (laying down) at the center of the rack, if you want to measure it out for your garage.

     

     

    On a difficulty scale from 1-10, the install is a 3.  The first time to mount it up will probably take you an hour or so, but after the mounts are securely in place, it'll take one guy about 10 minutes (easier with a helper) to unbolt the rack and take it off / put it back on the roof if you needed to remove it for some reason (clearance or whatever).

     

     

    Since almost everything is included already, the only upgrade you need to consider is whether you always want to keep the wire mesh flooring open above the moonroof area for an unobstructed view of the stars, or if you want to add an additional 7.25 sq. ft. of roof-top stowage capacity. 

     

    SEEM EXPENSIVE?  COMPARE THE OTHERS HERE.

     

    Wanna see the Install Instructions?

     

    Note: Due to its size, it can't be shipped UPS or FedEx Ground, so Truck Freight is the only option, unless you want to plan a vacation to Phoenix, Arizona. The pallet will leave our warehouse (85043) and be shipped to your business address.  Freight typically ranges from $110 to $250, depending on how far you are from Phoenix, AZ.  If you want it shipped to your residence, that's OK, but there is a $70 surcharge.  Sample cities:

     

    City Distance Transit Charges*
    Los Angeles, CA 400 mi 2 days $165*
    Denver, CO 800 mi 2 days $180*
    Seattle, WA 1400 mi 5 days $210*
    Chicago, IL 1700 mi 4 days $230*
    Miami, FL 2300 mi 5 days $250*
    Portland, ME 2700 mi 5 days $250*

     

    *Does not include $70 residential address delivery surcharge.

     

     

    Currently, we are building the racks on an order-only basis and a rotation-cycle every 3-4 months, as demand requires.  We may have a rack left over from the last batch, but no guarantees.

     

     

  •  

  • A NOTE ON ROOF RACK SHIPPING: ALL OUR ROOF RACKS are considered "oversized" by UPS and FedEx due to their physical size, which means that they instead ship by Motor Freight on a truck.   Read more about this process below...

     

  • INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT SHIPMENTS:  Please e-mail us for special instructions for International customers!!  The following DOES NOT APPLY to International Shipments, only Domestic.

     

    DOMESTIC MOTOR FREIGHT SHIPMENTS:   I have selected "225 lbs" as the weight for all our roof racks which need to go via Motor Freight (even though they only weigh 70-ish lbs, depending on the model), so I could  use our website's shipping module to charge you a close-to-accurate freight estimate to your Domestic (USA) commercial business address with a loading dock or forklift.  (if you need it shipped to a residential address, we're happy to do so, but there is a $70 add'l charge, AND we have to go through a whole "thing" with quotes and payments and such, so PLEASE give us a commercial address to save all that!!).  

  • If our freight cost on the rack is more expensive than the estimated shipping that you pay when you complete your order, I'll eat the difference if it's less than $25.  However, be prepared that I may hit you up for some add'l funds after you place your order if it's more than $25.  This extra amount is not normally more than a few bucks or so, but it depends on your location.  You always have the ability to cancel your order if you don't like the Motor Freight cost, too, so there is very little risk by ordering online and not having the freight charges be accurate.

  • See our
    Check out our
    For our

    How To Measure a Sway Bar for New Bushings

    Sway Bar Measuring Tape – How To Measure a Sway Bar

    Various Jeeps come with different sized anti-sway bars from the factory, based on whether or not it came with a Tow Package, UpCountry or OffRoad Package, or if the previous owner upgraded or changed something before you purchased it.

    I found a handy measuring tape on Energy Suspension’s website, which will help you figure out what size bars you have front and rear, and I wanted to make available to you here so that you know what bushings to purchase. We carry quite a few Energy Suspension Greaseable sway bar bushings, so if you can’t find what you’re looking for, let us know, and we’ll see if we can get a hold of it for you.

    Simply print out the Sway Bar Measuring Tape PDF Sway Bar Measuring Tape, cut it out, and wrap it around your anti-sway bar to see what it measures out at. If the metric scale doesn’t perfectly line up, try the standard scale, and see which one is closer. You’re going to want to err on the side of a bushings that’s too small by half a millimeter, than too large by half a millimeter, because sometimes it’s not 100% obvious how big it is, as it’ll sit between the hash marks.

    Do your best work, check both tape measures, and let us know what size you need!

    QUESTIONS? POST THEM HERE:

    What comes around, goes around…

    Thought I’d share a story with you…

    The other day, I was in the checkout line at Sprouts, buying some groceries, and wine, and as I was loading the cart onto the counter, I dropped one of the bottles of wine, shattering it all over the floor. The clerk behind the counter puts me at ease, saying, “Don’t worry about it…happens all the time!”. He calls over help to mop it up, has one of his co-workers open another register, and diverts other customers around my mess, and I go back to the rack to get another bottle. When I get back to the register, I tell him that I want to have him charge me for two of the bottle that I just handed him…once for the one I broke, and once for the one that I’m buying. He tells me that it’s not their policy (to charge the customer for broken product), and again, assures me it’s OK. I insist, telling him, “Well, it’s my policy to be responsible for my actions at every moment…it was totally my doing, and I’d feel better if you’d charge me for the broken one too.” He agrees to do so, rather than arguing with me about it, scans the bottle a second time, and then laughs. I look at him, and he said, since you ended up purchasing a 6th bottle of wine, our normal 10% 6-bottle discount automatically kicks in, and it covered all but $1.50 of the cost of the broken bottle!”

    Awesome!

    I’ve found whether you throw out a positive or you throw out a negative, you get one back! I had no idea it would be so instantaneously, though!!

    Anyway, thought you’d enjoy my cool story. I walked away with a smile on my face, knowing I did the right thing (in my mind, anyway), and a new loyalty for Sprouts !

    Ultimate Expedition Tool…”Swiss Room Box”

    How cool is this? If you haven’t seen the Swiss Room Box, you’ve got to check this out…


    Swiss Room Box Video

    http://www.swissroombox.com/swissRoomBox-home.html

    Not at all inexpensive, however, SUPER cool!!!!

    How would you “sell yourself” on spending $4300+ USD on something like this?? If it came with the Swiss girl in the video to operate it for me…mmmmmm…where’s my credit card??!! :-)

    Driveline Vibration and How To Cure It on Lifted Jeeps

    Driveline Vibration and How To Cure It on Lifted Jeeps

    This is a copy of an e-mail that I just sent to a good customer of ours, that I thought might benefit someone else, looking to eliminate driveline vibes from their lifted Jeep. Feel free to comment below for clarification, and I’ll answer your questions/comments as quickly as I can.

    ====================
    Here’s his original e-mails, compiled, which may sound similar to the problem you’re currently having too:

    -I’ve had a Clayton kit and about 7″s of lift on my WJ for quite a few years and finally decided that I’ve had enough with the vibration from what I believe was the front drive shaft. The rear was replaced prior with a Tom Woods and both were looked at by ADS in Mesa yesterday. They informed me that I’m basically screwed with the front angle off the t-case and the vibration will never go away. What have you done in the past or seen to help remedy this issue? I have a factory double-cardan on the front. ADS said it’s short, but not causing the issue in their opinion, simply the angle off the yoke. I’ve got to start using this as my daily driver again and want to make it sound. My current front drive shaft is a stock double-cardan style with fixed yokes at the t-case and axle, then the shaft is a splined slip to accommodate movement.

    Please show me the light. Thanks in advance.

    ====================
    And, here’s my response:
    Ok, so the FIRST thing, IMHO, that absolutely HAS to be done, is remove the front shaft, and drive around for a few days, during your normal schedule, and see if indeed ADS is correct, and the vibes are eliminated completely, or not. (I’m guessing not!) You could have TWO different shaft vibe problems, so removing the front shaft, and dialing in the rear to the best you can get FIRST, is the way to cure that “knowledge deficiency”. If you still have a stock set of tires, consider swaping them on, to reduce mud-terrain noise/vibes from the equation.

    Once the rear gets dialed in as good as it can possibly be, consider removing it, replacing the front, and driving around testing it in ONLY Front Wheel Drive. This *SHOULDN’T* have any short-term ill-effects on your NP247 case…it *SHOULD* just lock into it’s 50/50 mode, and that’s that. I’d suggest not doing any “long-term” testing on my theory/belief, though, unless you already have an NP242 or 231 ready to bolt in, and just want to find out if I was right, for sure, lol, but short-term (a day or two), it should be fine.

    And, that’s the process to eliminate the vibes, my friend…like it or not, lol. It ain’t easy, but after fine-tuning my WJ, I’m able to do 80mph with VERY little driveline vibe (tire vibe is another thing, completely, lol). However, I’m also running a high pinion rear axle, and the front pinion yoke has been “re-indexed” upwards, via separating the tubes from the diff, twisting it upwards, and re-welding it, to the tune of around $1k. At the time, it was the quickest solution, but longer-term thinking would have netted me a replacement front diff with a high-pinion, of the D44 variety, instead.

    Ultimately, you have Physics working against you, pure and simple. Irrespective of the driveline setup, having the pinion yokes of the t-case and the axle being separated vertically by several/many inches, you’re inherently going to have vibrations…and the more separation, the more vibration. Period. Less lift = less inherent vibes…end of story. High pinion axles are one Physics-related vibration solution, and lowering the t-case is the other one. Driveshaft configuration merely makes the best of the problem you already have…vertical separation of yokes.

    Do let me know what you end up finding out after removing the front shaft. I’d be pretty surprised if the front shaft is your MAIN source of vibes, frankly, based on my experience.

    Fuel-Economy and my Jeep Grand Cherokee

    From Alaska Expedition 2011

    I read a really interesting article posted on Overland News, which I wanted to get some feedback on from you guys.

    Until recently, I was running 35″x12.5″ ProComp Xtreme mud terrain tires, and recently swapped to 32″x11.5″ MT/Rs. Keeping the same 4.56 ratio in the axles, I’ve noticed an increase of around 1.5 mpg in my normal mixed highway/city driving, with limited time testing (only about a week, and 200 miles, and yes, I already adjusted the speedometer to my GPS, and it’s only off 1/2 a MPH.)

    Now, I’m getting 14.5 mpg in my normal mixed highway/city driving…which is not horrible, but it sure ain’t GREAT! By the way, one of the reasons why I selected that size tire, is because that’s the size that came on the factory Wrangler Rubicon, and you can pick up new/nearly new/barely used tires in that size on CraigsList for next to nothing.

    Anyway, the next step is to reduce the amount of lift I have from around 8″ to around 6″…which is the OTHER reason why I went with the slightly smaller tires this go-round. I’ve been doing so much Expedition wheeling recently, which requires a fair amount of highway driving to get to the trails, that I’m wanting to maximize my fuel economy in order to increase range between fill-ups, as well as shave off some fuel cost on long trips. I spent $2,500 in fuel on my summer 2011 trip to Alaska, and increasing my fuel economy by only 1 mpg, would have saved me around $250-$300 on that trip…which is not a giant savings, but if I increase by 2, or 3mpg, it adds up. And, that $300 savings is only ONE trip over ONE 32-day period of time. It doesn’t account for my yearly “daily-driving” around town and on weekend trails and road trips.

    From Alaska Expedition 2011

    Here’s the article, cross-posted from http://www.overlandexpo.com/overland-tech-travel/2012/3/2/speed-vs-economy-or-fd-12pvsquared-x-cda.html

    Speed vs. economy, or Fd = 1/2pv(squared) x CdA

    Friday, March 2, 2012 At 4:16PM

    Fuel economy is a funny subject. Very, very few people want to admit their vehicles get poor mileage. The overwhelming tendency is to fudge the other way when the subject comes up. I know for a fact there are guys who get 25 miles per gallon at 75 miles per hour in their one-ton diesel pickups while towing their 30-foot Airstream trailers, because I hear it with astonishing frequency.

    I also know they don’t.

    I never say as much when presented with these or similar absurd boasts, because there’s simply no profit in doing so. All I do is raise my eyebrows and say, subtly, “Wow. That would be impressive.” To show skepticism, much less outright derision, provokes the same peculiar outrage one receives doubting someone who claims to have been abducted and studied by aliens. There’s just no point in arguing.

    There’s also no point in arguing with the laws of physics—especially those relating to speed. Note that formula in the headline. In plain English it states that the drag (Fd) on a solid object moving through a fluid medium (which in physics includes air) is a function of one-half the density (p) of the medium times the speed (v) of the object, squared, times the drag coefficient (Cd) of the object times its cross sectional area (A).

    Note in particular the reference to the square of speed. That means that as speed goes up, the drag that results rises on a logarithmic curve. If speed doubles, drag quadruples.

    Here’s an example using an algorithm I found recently, calculated around a theoretical but representative vehicle with a drag coefficient of .30 (very low), and a frontal area of 30 square feet, on a paved road. Our vehicle requires just 2.6 horsepower to move at 20 mph. To reach 40 mph it needs 8.2 horsepower, and to reach 60 it needs 19.6. To cruise at 80 would require 39.9 horsepower—twice that needed to maintain 60. (To give you an idea of the drag acting on very high-performance sports cars, our vehicle would need 521 horsepower to hit 200 miles per hour.) The unassailable fact of highway driving is that beyond about 40 miles per hour aerodynamic drag overtakes powertrain friction and rolling resistance as the chief factor in fuel consumption—and from there on up it wages a rapidly escalating war on the level in your tank.

    Another . . . interesting . . . claim I’ve heard is from guys (mileage fudging seems to be strictly a male pastime) who say something like, “I get better mileage at 80 than at 60 because my engine is in its power band there.” Sorry, but nonsense. There might be situations in which, say, shifting from fourth gear at 55 mph into an overdrive fifth gear and adding a few miles per hour will do no harm to or perhaps even slightly improve economy, but for a given gear, adding speed will increase fuel consumption, plain and simple. No one is going to get better gas mileage at 80 than at 60.

    Algorithms are all well and good, but accurate real-world figures are more difficult to locate. Fortunately one of my best friends, Michael Cox, is diligent about recording the mileage he achieves with his 2006 4WD Dodge 2500 pickup, which has the Cummins turbodiesel, a six-speed manual transmission, and BFG All-Terrain tires. He can just break 21 mpg at 55 miles per hour. At 60 it drops to 19.5, at 65 it’s down to 18, and 70 mph knocks off another mile per gallon. He recorded similar changes with his Four Wheel Camper on the truck: 18.5 mpg at 60 mph, 16.5 at 65, and 15.5 or less at 70.

    The immediate lesson from all this is so obvious I won’t bother to state it. But more subtle contributors to drag are worth investigating. Cleaning up the aerodynamics of a vehicle can have a significant effect on fuel economy, even on one with the base Cd of an apartment building. Removing the tall porthole ConFerr roof rack on my FJ40 increased my highway (i.e. 60 mph) fuel economy by a full one mile per gallon—and going from 16 mpg to 17 in an FJ40 is a blessing. Suspension lifts and wider tires increase drag, the former hugely. So, somewhat surprisingly, do such add-ons as bull bars and driving lights, which create a dirty front of turbulence before the air even hits the vehicle proper. Extreme example: When my nephew Jake exploited his newfound skills at welding and fabricated an exoskeleton roll cage for his V6 Tacoma, his mileage plummeted from 18 to 13 mpg. So, do you really need a fat grille bar to fend off stray kangaroos, or would you be served with a simple winch bumper? Do you need that Paris/Dakar-esque bank of driving lights, or would a headlamp upgrade provide all the safe illumination necessary? With gasoline poised to top $4.00 per gallon and diesel above that as I write this, every bit will help on a long highway trip.

    Although rolling resistance becomes less important than aerodynamic drag at high speeds, it’s still worth considering. That one mile per gallon I gained on my FJ40 made up for the exact same amount I lost when I switched from BFG All-Terrains to BFG Mud-Terrains on that vehicle. Long experience with various tread types has led me to the conclusion that there’s not a big mileage difference between street/trail tread patterns such as BFG’s Rugged Terrain and the slightly more aggressive All-Terrain—but jumping to a Mud-Terrain you’ll take a quantifiable hit. So if you put mud-pattern tires on your vehicle just because you like the look, think again. You’ll get better mileage, better handling, a better ride, and longer tread life with an all-terrain pattern, probably equivalent traction in most circumstances, and better in some.

    What about tire width? Wider tires certainly increase frontal area and drag, but I’ve never seen an authoritative study to determine if a wide but short contact patch produces more rolling resistance than a longer, narrower one. You’d need to determine loading per square inch, hysteresis of the carcass, heat buildup, and other factors to make a solid judgement. With that said, I believe narrower tires offer advantages in so many other areas that I invariably stick with unfashionably skinny sizes. I just spent two weeks in Egypt’s sand seas in gargantuan Land Cruiser Troopies riding on pizza-cutter 235/85×16 All-Terrains, and we were never more than nominally stuck despite running near-street pressure in areas mined with the razor-sharp limestone outcroppings called kharafish.

    The unique characteristics of individual vehicles can make a difference in fuel economy as well. For example, my mechanic friend Bill Lee had a customer who drove an FJ60 with a five-speed conversion, who complained of wildly varying mileage on the highway in the 60-65 mph range. Bill figured out that the secondary venturi on the 2F engine’s two-barrel carburetor started opening at around 63 miles per hour. If the driver kept the speed just below that, mileage was a full two or three miles per gallon better than just above it.

    Modern fuel-injected engines are unlikely to have such a sharp break in efficiency. Nevertheless, it’s worth experimenting with varying speeds—especially if you have a mileage function on your vehicle’s computer—to see if it has a “sweet spot” above which consumption spikes.

    In general though, you can expect your computer to tell you, “Yep—when you drive faster you use more fuel, stupid.”

    =====================

    So, what fuel economy are YOU guys getting, and what are you doing to increase it? Or, is this not something you care a lot about, and want your Jeep as trail-worthy as possible, irrespective of the costs?

    Absolutely CRAZY downhill mountain bike course – Brazil

    This is pretty amazing. Camera-work is not what I could call “Hollywood-quality”, lol, but a really amazing downhill course these guys are going down, over LITERALLY THOUSANDS of stairs, around corners, and through houses.

    Fun stuff. No guts, no glory, eh? Would you ever do this?? Post your thoughts below.

    Legendary mountain biker brothers Dan and Gee Atherton go for a ride through Dona Marta slum in Brazil. The course was designed and built for the unprecedented Red Bull Desafio no Morro race.

    Jeep Grand Cherokee Diesel for 2013 – Looks like a “for sure” deal!!

    There has been a US-available diesel engine rumored to be planted in both the Wrangler and the Grand Cherokee for many years. In 2007, Daimler/Chrysler released a 6-cylinder diesel () in the WK Grand Cherokee, which got killed off in 2009 due to tighter US emissions restrictions…so it’s been a LONG time coming that we actually have some sort of Diesel offerings in the Grand Cherokee. My suspicion is that they are going to test the marketability of the Diesel in the Grand, and then offer up one for the Wrangler after they see that they sell to expectation. Jeep Wrangler guys have been SCREAMING for Diesel offerings for a million years (almost).

    Anyway, here’s the article that got me all excited about the “verification” that all this was not still just “talk” from Chrysler…

    Chrysler to add workers for 2013 Jeep Grand Cherokee diesel production
    Jan 5, 2012 by Steve Tarlow

    JEEP WILL PRODUCE A DIESEL GRAND CHEROKEE FOR THE FIRST TIME SINCE 2008. (PHOTO CREDIT: CC BY-SA/AMMAR SHAKER/WIKIPEDIA)

    Good hiring news is on tap for the Chrysler Group, reports Automotive News. In preparation for production of the 2013 Jeep Grand Cherokee clean diesel, Chrysler will add a third shift at a Detroit SUV plant. This will mark the diesel Grand Cherokee’s first appearance on the North American market since 2008, said company spokesman Todd Goyer.

    Diesel Engine for the WK Grand Cherokee
    Yay! Finally a Diesel

    Chrysler to hire 1,100 workers

    According to reports, the Chrysler Group will add 1,100 workers as part of a new third shift at the Jefferson North assembly plant. The bolstered workforce should enable the automaker to reach its production goals with the new Jeep Grand Cherokee and keep the Chrysler name on top of the heap when it comes to innovation, noted Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne.
    “Detroit long has been home to renowned innovators and craftsmen,” Marchionne said. “So it is in the Motor City, home of our industrial heritage and a resilient people, that we are entrusting the manufacture not only of the ultimate American sports car, the SRT Viper, and the Jeep Grand Cherokee – the most awarded SUV ever – but also a diesel version of the Jeep Grand Cherokee for North American markets.”
    Grand Cherokee sales were up 51 percent in the U.S. last year to 127,744 units, while the Durango tallied a respectable 51,697 units sold in its first full year back on the U.S. auto market. The upcoming diesel version of the Grand Cherokee will reportedly deliver both greater torque and increased fuel efficiency in a clean-burning diesel engine. It will produce 241 horsepower and 406 pound-feet of torque in the base model, a V6 turbo diesel. While fuel economy isn’t known yet, a lower-powered European version achieved the equivalent of 28.3 mpg U.S.
    Jefferson North adds Maserati to the mix

    Previously known as a facility where the Jeep Grand Cherokee and Dodge Durango are assembled, the Jefferson North plant will soon also be responsible for portions of the 2013 Maserati Kubang. This SUV will be making its North American debut for Fiat S.p.A., the company that controls Chrysler.
    Leaked photo of the 2013 Maserati Kubang concept

    Automotive News
    Green Car Reports
    USA Today

    SRT8 Grand Cherokee Company Vehicles for Ferrari Race Drivers

    SRT8 Grand Cherokee Company Vehicles for Ferrari Race Drivers
    SRT8 Grand Cherokee Company Vehicles for Ferrari Race Drivers

    RED RACERS: Ferrari F1 stars Fernando Alonso (left) and Felipe Massa (right) with one of the pair’s new Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT8s.

    Motoring European and US ‘Triumph’ over Japanese Ferrari racers get company Jeeps Given time, this Citroen is an absolute charmer Leaked: Infiniti Emerg-E hybrid supercar Group riding: be aware of the road rules Blue skies smiling at Mazda 3 Mazda’s BT-50 is a beaut ute Son smashes dad’s loaned classic car into sea Police U-turn on speeding tolerance Red Edition a special Lexus
    While they drive Ferraris for work and have their own personal Fiat Abarth 695 Tributos to run around in when they’re not on the track, the prancing horse brand’s F1 drivers Felipe Massa and Fernando Alonso now have company cars supplied by Jeep.

    The concept is not such a stretch when you realise that Fiat owns Ferrari and Alfa Romeo and more recently Chrysler, which owns Jeep, so a pair of Grand Cherokees in the Maranello carpark isn’t that surprising.

    They are no ordinary Jeeps, being specially prepared versions of the new Grand Cherokee SRT8, each with a 6.4-litre Hemi V8 offering up to 465kW and 630Nm of torque, enough to deliver a zero-to-100kmh time of 4.8 seconds and a potential top speed of 257kmh.

    Most SRT8 Grand Cherokees delivered in their native United States are black, but for Massa and Alonso, the Jeeps are executed in Ferrari’s signature “rosso corsa” (racing red) contrasted with matte black roofs and grilles, gloss black and silver racing stripes, black alloy wheels with red brake calipers and red accents on the front grille.

    The interior is clad in red leather, with the leather-rimmed steering wheel in black leather.

    “We are excited and proud to be able to hand over the exclusively personalised ‘Ferrari- style’ versions of the most powerful and fastest Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT8 of all time to two of the most talented drivers in the world,” said Beth Peretta, marketing director of the SRT Brand.

    “We are sure Fernando and Felipe will feel perfectly at home at the wheel of these cars that take styling cues from Ferrari with rosso corsa bodywork and that represent the pinnacle in terms of performance for the Jeep brand.”

    We’ll make one prediction. Next year, the Ferrari Jeeps will go on eBay as the F1 drivers will inevitably get their own Maserati Kubangs, which will keep their SUV aspirations a little closer to the Ferrari brand. The Kubang will have underpinnings based on the Grand Cherokee’s but will use a V8 engine put together for Maserati by Ferrari and clad in a body by car design genius Giugiaro.

    Ferrari racers get company Jeeps: http://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/motoring/6414130/Ferrari-racers-get-company-Jeeps

    Recreational Trails Program ( RTP ) – How We Can Help Keep Trails Open

    Keeping trails open is something we all care about…some of us to a greater extent than others. (not saying it’s right or wrong…it just “is what it is”.) For those of you like me and my family, we work extra hard being involved, in order to make up for the folks who may think it’s a good cause, but for whatever reason, not take action. I’d love to get you involved too, to help us pick up the slack.

    RTP Remains in Jeopardy!

    The Recreational Trails Program (RTP), arguably the most important government program ever created to benefit motorized recreation (as well as non-motorized recreation) faces a big hurdle in transportation reauthorization legislation. As you may or may not yet know, the RTP funds the development and maintenance of thousands of miles of motorized and non-motorized trails, but without our help and support, the RTP may be eliminated.

    Please click the link below to send a pre-written email to your own Senators, encouraging them to act. It literally takes 3 seconds, if you have auto-populate turned on, or 15 seconds if not.

    https://secure3.convio.net/arra/site/Advocacy?pagename=homepage&page=UserAction&id=341&autologin=true&JServSessionIdr004=tgdewf64p8.app334a

    Transportation reauthorization legislation, known as MAP-21, that passed the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee late last year is being brought up for a vote soon, possibly as early as this week.

    MAP-21 threatens the very existence of RTP by eliminating the program’s dedicated funding. I would ask you take action with me, to make sure that YOUR Senators understand how important RTP is to you and to urge them to amend the bill to protect the Recreational Trails Program.

    Please click the link below to send a pre-written email to your own Senators, encouraging them to act. It literally takes 3 seconds, if you have auto-populate turned on, or 15 seconds if not.

    https://secure3.convio.net/arra/site/Advocacy?pagename=homepage&page=UserAction&id=341&autologin=true&JServSessionIdr004=tgdewf64p8.app334a

    This is an old Press Release, but I am going to start following their posts, and keep you guys up to date as well, by reading the info, and disseminating it for you. Keep subscribed to this post, and/or join their website directly at http://www.arra-access.com/site/PageServer?pagename=arra_about . Also, please click the Social Media Facebook/Twitter “Share” button below if you’d like to post this on your wall or page, to get YOUR friends involved.Here’s the ARRA Press Release, to bring you up to date about the Recreational Trails Program:

    Contact: Larry Smith, 202-336-5116
    Tuesday, January 24, 2012
    National Motorized Recreation Groups to Convene in Washington, D.C. in Support of Recreational Trails Program

    Americans for Responsible Recreational Access Schedules Key Hill Visits

    Washington, D.C. – Americans for Responsible Recreational Access (ARRA) will host key leaders from the motorized recreation community January 31 through February 1 in Washington, D.C. A crucial purpose of the gathering is to show continued support for the Recreational Trails Program.

    In advance of the meeting, 12 motorized recreation organizations sent a letter to House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Chairman John Mica last week urging him to “…retain the Recreational Trails Program (RTP) with dedicated funding in transportation reauthorization legislation.”

    ARRA’s Executive Director, Larry Smith said, “The RTP is vitally important to the entire recreation community and is the most important government program ever enacted for motorized recreationists. As such, we thought it important to make sure Chairman Mica and other key transportation leaders continue to hear from the national OHV groups on this issue. We will have a great group in town and we are all pulling in the same direction.”

    Smith continued, “Millions of motorized recreation enthusiasts and a billion dollar industry will be represented at our Hill visits at the end of the month.” Representatives from American Council of Snowmobile Associations, American Motorcyclist Association, BlueRibbon Coalition, Motorcycle Industry Council, National Off-Highway Vehicle Conservation Council, Off-Road Business Association, Recreational Off-Highway Vehicle Association, Specialty Equipment Market Association, Specialty Vehicle Institute of America, Tread Lightly!, and the United Four Wheel Drive Associations have been invited to attend.

    “In the grand scheme of things the RTP is a very inexpensive program that all trail users, motorized or non-motorized, benefit from, and that provides real, positive economic impact in many rural communities. Further, the program is based on the user-pay user-benefit philosophy as funding is derived from the taxes motorized recreationists pay at the pump when they fuel up their off-highway vehicles. We hope Congress chooses to continue to provide dedicated funding for RTP. We are certainly going to do all we can to let Members know how important RTP is to the motorized community.”
    Based in Washington, D.C., Americans for Responsible Recreational Access represents the interests of millions of Americans who enjoy the great outdoors and who believe public lands and waterways should remain open for recreational pursuits.

    Check out its web site at www.arra-access.com.

    Kraken Monster Hemi Jeep JK Wrangler Crushing Cars – Redneck Games

    A local 4×4 shop here in Phoenix www.cop4x4.com built an absolutely bad ass Wrangler JK with a 5.7L Hemi Swap and 54″ tires on it, and took it out to the wrecking yard to drive over some wrecked cars, 80’s Bigfoot-style. (They did this as eco-friendly as possible, making sure to drain all the fluids first.)

    KOR’s own Rob P. was out there getting footage, and witnessed the silliness first hand. Thank you, YouTube!!

    Here’s some pictures…

    ZJ Grand Cherokee Roof Rack Platform System

    To check shipping cost or purchase, please visit the ZJ Grand Cherokee Roof Rack Platform shopping cart page.

     

    If you're considering a Roof Rack for your ZJ Jeep Grand Cherokee, but are concerned about the increased height that a typical roof rack requires, we have just the solution for you: Our new Hard-KOR Roof Rack Platform gives you a flat platform that mounts securely to your factory roof rails, and adds only 1.5 inches of increased height, allowing you to park in your garage, or in parking structures, with no problem at all. Here's some of the many benefits to the Hard-KOR Roof Rack Platform:

     

  • Mount some Rubbermaid containers on top, or lash them down with straps and a webbed cargo net for extra storage during long road trips with the family.
  •  

  • Toss your oversized spare tire on the roof, and get it out of the cargo area with the INCLUDED tire mounting plate and hardware.
  •  

  • Mount your roof-top tent (RTT) easily to the Roof Rack Platform, which allows it to be removed more easily than the permanent roof mounts.
  •  

  • Or, for a low-buck RTT option, pitch your current tent on top of the platform, keeping you off the ground, and away from critters.
  •  

  • Removable light bars are available as well, so you can add up to four lights across the front or rear (or both), which can be easily removed.
  •  

  • The entire Roof Rack Platform can be easily removed with 8 nuts, leaving the rail mounts in place, for easy mounting and dismounting
  •  

    To check shipping cost or purchase, please visit the ZJ Grand Cherokee Roof Rack Platform shopping cart page.

     

     

    To check shipping cost or purchase, please visit the ZJ Grand Cherokee Roof Rack Platform shopping cart page.

     

    Adjusting Your Steering Stops for ZJ, XJ, TJ, and YJ

    For those of you with a ZJ Grand Cherokee, an XJ Cherokee, or a TJ or YJ Wrangler, you may have tire rubbing issues when you turn full-lock, due to taller or wider tires. Wheel spacers, like THESE, sometimes help if your tires are set too far in, but if your tires are set too far out, due to aftermarket wheel backspacing, steering stops are your friends.

    Tires rub on Jeep front axle? Here's your answer...
    Mid 80's to early 2000's Dana 30 Steering Stop adjustment

    There is a well-written article with step by step instructions on adjusting your steering stops, located over at 4x4xplor.com that you should check out, if this is a problem for you. Literally 5 minutes and a few 5-cent flat washers can fix this really annoying problem!! Here’s the link: http://www.4x4xplor.com/steerstop.html

    For you JK Wrangler and WJ Grand Cherokee guys with tire-rubbing problems, the concept is the same, but will require a bit more work. You can have someone tack-weld a flat-washer into position (same place, just no bolt pre-existing from the factory), or I supposed you could also drill, tap, and find a bolt that works, too. (then again, I have a welder handy, so for me, 2 minutes tacking in a washer is a LOT easier than drilling and tapping, lol.)

    This Is Why It’s Important To “Buy American”…

    This was a news story that ran on ABC News, that drives home the point, quite effectively, on how much difference buying US-made products makes to our Country, our cities, and our neighbors as a whole. Their point is simple: if only 5% more US-made goods were purchased by home builders, we’d create close to a quarter-million new US jobs. Check out this video:

    Here is a printable vendor list of US-made products, for when you’re in the market for something: http://www.kevinsoffroad.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/PDF-Made-in-America-Vendor-List.pdf

    Here is an interactive map that ABC News did, so that you can find suppliers in your state, or surrounding areas:
    http://abcnews.go.com/WN/MadeInAmerica/page/map-find-made-america-goods-13917383

    Meanwhile, we’re doing our parts, and keeping a bunch of Americans working, here at KOR. We *NEVER* purchase something foreign if we can get around doing so. Every single one of our KOR-branded products are Made in the USA, with the exception of our steering stabilizers and offroad lights. As soon as we find a suitable US-manufacturer for them, we’ll swap over too. Every one of our laser-cut parts, every CNC bend, every weld, every powdercoated finish, and every hardware package is created by US-labor, and will continue to do so. Our goal for 2012 is to grow by 50%, so there will be 50% more US-Dollars being spent, from our company account, on US-manufacturers. Unfortunately, the trend in our industry is to outsource as much product as possible to China, and other off-shore sources, sending the profits directly out of our country, and benefiting not our neighbors, not our friends, but to people in foreign lands. The biggest names in our industry are doing this, day in and out, and are slowly eroding America’s manufacturing industry, putting your neighbors, friends, and loved ones out of work as their industries slowly close down.

    We challenge you to print out a copy of the US-vendors, and share it with the people you work with, and the people you hang out with. Many people would be HAPPY to purchase a new US-made product, if they only knew where to get one…and even if the cost is a few bucks more. if by spending an extra buck or two, we’re keeping 50% of the cost of the product right here, keeping US-workers working; damn it…that’s a good investment, so far as I can tell. Join the Made In America Challenge today, and share this post on your Facebook accounts. Together we can make MASSIVE changes in our economy, re-establishing America as an economic strength once again, and ourselves (and loved ones) benefiting directly from the movements we make.

    VERY Passionately,
    Kevin, the KOR krew and our Families

    Jeep® Introduces New Production-Intent Concept Grand Cherokee at Houston Auto Show 1/25/2012

    HOUSTON, Jan. 25, 2012 /PRNewswire/ —

  • New production-intent vehicle boasts stunning exterior with distinct, aggressive flair
  • Jeep connects with consumers to name model via online Jeep “Name My Ride” contest
  • Vehicle also on display at Washington (D.C.) Auto Show tomorrow
  • Jeep Grand Cherokee sales reach 127,744 units in the U.S. in 2011, up 51 percent vs. 2010
  • Jeep brand sales increase 153 percent in Texas in 2011; Grand Cherokee up 226 percent in Texas
    Grand Cherokee most awarded SUV ever; named “SUV of Texas” in 2011 and 2010
  • The Jeep® brand has introduced a new, production-intent concept version of its award-winning Grand Cherokee, a unique model with distinctive yet stealthy exterior cues designed to attract new Jeep Grand Cherokee enthusiasts and customers.
    (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20120125/DE38761 )
    Showing the vehicle publicly for the first time this morning at the Houston Auto Show, Jeep also announced that it has created an online contest for consumers to name the new production-intent Grand Cherokee concept. The person who chooses the winning name will have an opportunity to win a new 2012 Jeep Grand Cherokee.
    “Highlighted by a unique platinum-chrome front-end appearance and distinctive black-gloss 20-inch wheels and exterior treatments, our new Grand Cherokee concept provides a completely new look – one that is edgy and aggressive, and certainly different than any Grand Cherokee on the road today,” said Mike Manley, President and CEO – Jeep Brand, Chrysler Group LLC. “Jeep enthusiasts have always appreciated limited-edition models and the ability to customize their vehicles. This new Grand Cherokee comes with a unique, ‘factory-customized’ stealth appearance directly from Jeep, and is certain to attract interest from an array of potential customers.
    “We plan to garner feedback from consumers at the Houston Auto Show, and via our online Jeep ‘Name My Ride’ contest,” Manley added. “If the level of excitement is what we anticipate, this new Grand Cherokee will be in Jeep showrooms this spring.”
    In the U.S., Grand Cherokee sales increased 51 percent in 2011 vs. 2010. In Texas, sales increased 226 percent. The Jeep Grand Cherokee was named “SUV of Texas” the past two years by the Texas Auto Writers Association.
    Jeep Grand Cherokee Production-intent Concept
    So Sleek...
    With the Laredo X package as its starting point, the new production-intent concept Jeep Grand Cherokee combines a variety of exterior design changes to create a unique model with an aggressive, chrome and “blacked-out” look.
    The vehicle’s grille surround appears in Black, and mesh grille texture in Platinum Chrome. A Platinum Chrome lower fascia applique completes the unique front-end appearance. Black headlamp bezels and a Black liftgate light-bar continues the “blacked-out” theme throughout the vehicle’s exterior.
    The production-intent concept rides on 20-inch tires that surround one-of-a-kind Black-gloss aluminum wheels for Jeep.
    Based on the Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo X package, the production-intent concept model includes standard leather-trimmed seats, heated front seats, leather-wrapped steering wheel and shifter, a 9-speaker 506 watt amp sound system with subwoofer, iPod/MP3 connectivity, Parkview™ rear back-up camera, ParkSense® rear-park assist system, Keyless Enter-N-Go, Chrysler Group’s Uconnect hands-free communications system, and more than 50 advanced safety and security features.
    Shown in Houston as a Brilliant Black 4×4 model, a Deep Cherry Red 4×4 version will be on display tomorrow at the Washington (D.C.) Auto Show.

    Jeep “Name My Ride” Contest
    Also announced at the Houston Auto Show, consumers now have the opportunity to name the Jeep Grand Cherokee concept vehicle, via Jeep.com/namemyride or m.jeep.com/namemyride (mobile site). The Jeep “Name My Ride” contest begins today. The Jeep brand will compile entries and narrow them down to three favored choices. Consumers will then have the opportunity to vote online for the winning name, to be announced in May. The person who submits the chosen, official vehicle name will have a chance to win a new 2012 Jeep Grand Cherokee. Customers can visit Jeep.com/namemyride to submit a name for consideration, and for more information and complete contest rules.

    2011 Jeep sales highlights
    In 2011, Jeep brand sales increased 44 percent in the U.S. – with each Jeep model up more than 30 percent – while industry sales rose 11 percent. Globally, Jeep sales increased 41 percent in 2011. December marked the best Jeep sales month since 2007. Jeep Grand Cherokee sales were up 51 percent in 2011 in the U.S., with more than 127,000 units sold.

    2012 Jeep Grand Cherokee
    Jeep Grand Cherokee delivers premium on-road performance while maintaining the Jeep brand’s legendary four-wheel-drive, torque-on-demand two-speed transfer case and towing capability. It offers improved fuel economy (up to 23 miles per gallon), a driving range of more than 550 miles, superb on-road ride and handling, a world-class interior cabin, more than 50 safety and security features, and a variety of advanced technology features.
    Contributing to Grand Cherokee’s class-leading capability is the combination of Jeep’s Quadra-Lift™ air suspension system and the Jeep Selec-Terrain™ traction control system that lets customers choose the 4×4 setting for the optimum driving experience on all terrains.

    The 2012 Jeep Grand Cherokee is available with three 4×4 systems, and with either V-6 or V-8 powertrains.

    Jeep Brand
    Built on more than 70 years of legendary heritage, Jeep is the authentic SUV brand with class-leading capability, craftsmanship and versatility for people who seek extraordinary journeys. The Jeep brand delivers an open invitation to live life to the fullest by offering a full line of vehicles that continue to provide owners with a sense of security to handle any journey with confidence.

    The Jeep vehicle lineup includes Compass, Grand Cherokee, Liberty, Patriot, Wrangler and Wrangler Unlimited. To meet consumer demand around the world, all Jeep models are sold outside North America – and all are available in right-hand drive versions and with gasoline and diesel powertrain options. Chrysler Group LLC sells and services vehicles in approximately 120 countries around the world.

    SOURCE Chrysler Group LLC

    Alaska Excursion Coverage, and AWESOME WJ pictures!

    For those of you who don’t already know, I went along with a local Jeep club to Alaska (July 2011), and saw some BEAUTIFUL views and places.

    Anyway, our trip was covered in this month’s JPFreak magazine, which is a great mag, and you can check out online here: JPFreak January 2012

    Also, one of our WJ customers is an AMAZING photographer, and he’s taken some really cool pix of his WJ Build he did on his 2001. Pix are right here: http://goo.gl/3tY6I

    Here’s a whole bunch of Alaska trip pix that I took, after I got separated from the group due to a bent axle shaft in Montana delayed me 4 days. http://goo.gl/xhFYk

    That’s all I’ve got for you today!!

    North, to Alaska…go North…the rush is ON!!

    The Duke did it…and so will I!!

    I’m on my way to Alaska on July 1st, 2011…all the way to Ivvavik National Park and back, touching the Arctic Circle and hitting every National Park (well, most of them) on the way up and back before our return to Phoenix, AZ on August 1st, 2011

    I’ll be posting updates along the way…photography, video, and comments. As you could imagine, I’m REALLY looking forward to this!!

    Photos are on our Picasa Account HERE :

    Video updates are on our YouTube account HERE

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    June 30, 2011 –

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    July 1st, 2011 – Flagstaff, AZ > Fillmore, UT – Uneventful drive. Took some pretty pix of the trip.

    From Alaska Expedition 2011

    ALL PHOTOS ARE LOCATED HERE

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    July 2nd, 2011 – Fillmore, UT > Dillon, MT – Again, uneventful driving…but pretty!

    ====================

    July 3rd, 2011 – Dillon, MT > Glacier, MT

    On the way from Dillon to Glacier National Park in Montana, I heard a noise coming from the rear end, getting louder. After a quick inspection, found differential oil smoking out of the driver’s side tube. Not good. I checked the fluid level, and it was good. I decided to drive BACK to Missoula for a new bearing, but when I saw my rear tire wobbling left/right, I decided not to risk driving, so I was towed in to O’Reilly’s Auto Parts Missoula (the guys there were EXTREMELY helpful and friendly! If only we got this sort of service from EVERY auto parts store, lol) in town, and tore it apart.

    Turns out the driver’s side bearing was in the process of eating the bearing race on the shaft as it was seizing, and there was not much left of the bearing itself. It must have been close to red-hot inside, because, to make matters worse, the 5 minutes I spent on the side of the road was enough to bend the shaft with the weight of the Jeep on it while it was “malleable”. Tomorrow’s the Fourth…everyone is closed. So, I got a hotel room downtown, and did a little bar-hopping (which was GREAT fun…what a great town and people!) instead of sitting in the room, lamenting being “temporarily disabled” for a few days.

    Not exactly what I had in mind

    ====================

    July 4th, 2011 – Had a very timely run-in with a local at the grocery store, who knew of a guy in town who could help with my plight. I left him a voice mail, but don’t expect to hear from him until Tuesday, due to the holiday. Looks like I’ll be enjoying a Fourth of July celebration along with 100k Missoulans!

    ====================

    July 5th, 2011 – If the people could be any nicer in this town, I’m not sure how. I have gotten nothing but outstanding service, friendly, patient people, and extremely knowledgible people at the three parts counters I’ve been to, and the machine shop as well. I think the great Missoula secret is that they kill all the rude people, such that they don’t breed. It’s unreal…seriously. I’ve never been to a Checker/O’Reilly’s Auto Parts where EVERY counter guy not only knows his stuff, but is full of suggestions, and genuinely interested in helping me out of a spot. I love this town.

    And, another “shout-out” goes to Dutchman Motorsports out of Portland, OR, who went out of their way to accommodate me, and get a shaft out the door at 3pm, via Priority Overnight, after calling in the specs at 11am. In other words, they had the shaft ready to ship in less than 4 hours, built to spec, totally custom, and for a VERY reasonable expedite fee! These guys have saved my bacon, and I’m truly appreciative. If you’re looking for custom axle shafts for your project…give Derek a shout at Dutchman Motorsports …I think you’ll be glad you did. Parts are on their way, and I’ll have the Jeep back on the road by tomorrow.

    PS: By the way, make certain that your differential cover’s fill plug BOTTOM is approximately 1″ below the centerline of the axle tube. My hybrid D60 with 9″ outers has an OX locker in it, and the level of the OX cover’s fill plug is about an inch or so too low to get the correct amount of fluid into it due to the pinion angle pointing upwards, at the differential. I don’t think this is a flaw of OX…I think it’s just my pinion angle not allowing me to get the right amount of fluid into the diff, which means that the axle tubes don’t have any fluid in them, aside from the fluid that’s carried down the axle shaft from the carrier. I am going to park the Jeep nose-down into a ditch to fill the oil up to the proper fluid level, and hopefully that’ll be the LAST time I burn up a bearing.

    PPS: If you’re swapping to beefier axles, I HIGHLY recommend considering full-floating axle shafts. The issue of burning up a bearing and damaging my axle shaft would not be a problem at all with a full-float setup.

    PPPS: Missoula is outstanding. What a great vibe, beautiful women with dresses and long hair, friendly people, good food, and relatively cheap. Hell…I might come back to the downtown area on vacation sometime…this is outstanding! Hit the Rhino, Red’s and Iron Horse on the first night, and then Tamarack Ale House Brewery and Top Hat tonight. I freakin’ love it here!!

    Missoula, MT – Voted best place to break down and have to stay for a few days.

    ====================

    July 6th, 2011 – Got the axle shaft in at the hotel, which was overnighted in from Dutchman, per their promise, and got the axle shaft installed. I decided to inspect the passenger side also, just to make CERTAIN that there were no problems with the bearing on that side. That side was leaking a bit, so it had dirt and grime all over the place. Even being careful, when I went to remove the retaining plate, I dropped a bit of dirt down, into the bearing. CRRAAAAAAPPPP!! Decided to tear it all down, and put a new bearing on that shaft as well, because who knows if it was damaged from lack of fluid…better to be safe, especially since I already had all the tools out, and knew the people would could help with pressing on the bearing. Buttoned it all back up, parked the nose of the Jeep downhill, and filled the diff fluid as much as I could. I also parked it with the passenger axle tube lower than the driver, so that the fluid would fill the passenger side tube up before it spilled out the fill hole.

    From Alaska Expedition 2011
    From Alaska Expedition 2011

    So, around 6pm, I got on the road to Glacier, finally, and enjoyed the late afternoon and evening there. Took a short 3 mile hike around the falls, took lots of pictures, and was TRULY grateful for being back on the road again. My buddies were already in Alaska by this time, I was only 4 days behind, and with a lot of driving, I think I can catch them on their way back from the Dempster Highway.


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v

    ====================

    July 7th, 2011 – Big Arm, MT to West Glacier, then to Lake McDonald and East Glacier to camp



    ====================

    July 8th, 2011 –

    Left my campsite in Glacier and headed over to Elk Summit trail head,

    From Alaska Expedition 2011

    where I hiked an approximate 8-mile round trip before I headed out of town for Banff. The first two miles of this trail were mostly flat, the second two miles included a 2,500 foot elevation gain, peaking out at 7,600 ft. elevation. I gave in at 7,000 ft…that was MORE than enough for me. What an unbeleviably beautiful, but STEEP, trail.

    From Alaska Expedition 2011
    From Alaska Expedition 2011





    Was going to try to make Banff, AB tonight, but stopped in Calgary to figure out exactly what I was going to do about my schedule being all goofed up. Decided that driving to Alaska was out, but that a ferry, a cruise, or a flight would still work out for me. I spent a few hours online, researching my options, and soaking my poor legs and knees from the hike yesterday, in the hot tub at the hotel. Just because I’m behind on the itinerary, doesn’t mean that I can’t enjoy myself on my OWN trip…one with no deadlines…just making it up as I go! True choice, and free spirit…I can live with that!!

    As a result, I also wound up seeing BC-DC , who is an AC-DC cover band, playing at a local bar just outside of Calgary in High River, AB. In one word: Outstanding! These guys did an AMAZING job of both old and newish AC-DC songs, of which I’m a huge fan of. Check out this quick video I took:

    ====================

    July 9th, 2011 –

    Drove from Calgary to Banff National Park after spending a half-day in the AM at the library and the travel agency, attempting to figure out exactly what to do about Alaska…boat, fly, or what… Beautiful place! I’m going to list Banff on my list of places to come back to.

    From Alaska Expedition 2011
    From Alaska Expedition 2011

    Since I’m off schedule anyway, I figured I might as well spend some time checking out the town. What a great place…VERY pretty. I really like it here!

    From Alaska Expedition 2011

    ====================

    July 10th, 2011 – I woke up today to the chirping birds of the Johnston Campground, just outside of Banff. Got a little rain last night, but the tent kept me nice and dry. Oddly, the staff here in Banff National Park is super-nice…but the tourists almost couldn’t be bothered to say “hi” to me…even after I initiated. Odd. You leave the place you’re at…you’re in beautiful areas…enjoying scenery…and don’t want to have a thing to do with other humans? Humans are strange. Why not stay inside your house, just like every other week, if you’re that anti-social?

    Enjoyed Banff for the AM, and then headed off to Lake Louise, AB to enjoy the sights there. Wow…how pretty is THIS place!!

    From Alaska Expedition 2011
    From Alaska Expedition 2011
    From Alaska Expedition 2011
    From Alaska Expedition 2011
    From Alaska Expedition 2011

    ====================

    July 11th, 2011 – Stayed the night at Canyon Hot Springs last night and tonight. Needed a day to do a little organization, catch up on e-mails, and figure out the rest of my newly-found flexible itinerary. I realized two days previous that the ONLY way to catch the rest of the group is to drive right by all of the sights that they stopped at on the way up, and basically drive like a Over-The-Road trucker in order to catch them. Well, that ain’t my cup of tea, so I weighed my options, and decided that I’d instead, fly out of Seattle into Anchorage, and either rent a car, or hop on a tour and spend 5 or so days doing that. I set out on this trip to see Alaska, and though it’s not exactly the way I had planned…I can still both enjoy my trip AND the sights, AND get to the end point…Alaska…by doing it this way. I heard a quote, paraphrased, which went, “The measure of a man is how solid and sturdy he can build a house with the bricks thrown at him by others”. In this case, I was dealt a hand, in which I needed to learn a lesson on how to repair my Jeep’s bent axle shaft and bearing in an Auto Parts store parking lot, AND, how to make the best of being 4 days behind. Well, this is how it’s going to be done…flexibility…the mark of a great trip, lol.

    From Alaska Expedition 2011
    From Alaska Expedition 2011

    ====================

    July 12th, 2011 –

    From Alaska Expedition 2011

    Menandered my way South and West from Lake Louise / Banff, through Revelstoke, Shuswap Lake, Kamloops, and Chilliwack (all in BC), and turned south at Point Sumas, WA before I got to Vancouver, BC.

    From Alaska Expedition 2011
    From Alaska Expedition 2011
    From Alaska Expedition 2011

    I drove through the border crossing, and was IMMEDIATELY rewarded with $1.00 off per gallon of gas, compared to Canada. Wow…there is a HUGE difference, just crossing the border…and we complain about OUR taxes. Craziness!! The highest I saw fuel today was at Salmon Arm (Shuswap Lake area) at $1.35/L, which translates to $5.13 CAD per gallon, which is around $5.50/gal USD after all the exchange rates and fees and such. At those rates, can you imagine that a head of lettuce or fresh fruit or beef is more expensive too, due to the increased cost of transport? Hell, even the bags of ice were $3.00 each…more than double what we pay in the States…and this is ICE for God’s sake…not like Canadians don’t have and abundance of water or freezers. Bear in mind that we’re not any more than a few hours north of the CAN/USA border here. I hope they like their socialized health care…cause hell…that’s a lot of extra $ flying out of Canadians’ pockets on a monthly basis.

    Enough with the politics…saw some really amazing stuff today…glad I took the path of least resistance, lol.




    ====================

    July 13th, 2011 –
    Woke up in Mt. Vernon, WA this AM, back in the good ‘ol US of A, and spent the morning getting ready for my flight tomorrow: non-stop from Seattle to Anchorage. It wasn’t what I had planned originally, obviously, but it’ll get me into the heart of Alaska, from which I can venture out on a tour or with a rental car, to see the area sights. We’re working with what we’ve got, here…but I’m thoroughly enjoying the idea of sitting on a plane for 6 hours round trip, versus driving 8 days straight up and back…which allows me to see more of Alaska. Again, not ideal, but what we’re looking at, due to my delay in Montana repairing the Jeep.

    ====================

    July 14th, 2011 –
    Seattle, WA to Anchorage, AK via Alaska Airlines, then drove to Seward, AK via Seward Highway

    ====================

    July 15th, 2011 –
    Kenai Fjords Glacier Tour on tour boat, then drove Seward, AK to Soldotna, AK via the Old Seward Highway through Kenai National Wildlife Preserve

    This is Northwest Glacier, just after a chunk broke off at the top of the glacier. I didn’t get the original “calving”, but I got the “ice-fall” coming off the top…absolutely amazing!

    More of Northwest Glacier…Video 2/4

    Video 3/4

    Video 4/4

    ====================

    July 16th, 2011 –
    Soldotna, AK to Homer, AK

    ====================

    July 17th, 2011 –
    All day in Homer, AK on a Sea Kayak tour (True North Tours), plus dinner with Russ and Ralph at Fresh Sourdough Express (amazing organic and locally grown restaurant/bakery

    ====================

    July 18th, 2011 –
    Homer, AK to Denali NP, AK

    Meanwhile, back in Phoenix, my neighbors were having a HUGE dust storm…check out the time lapse video on this…too cool!!

    July 19th, 2011 – Denali National Park

    Alaskan Expedition 2011

    We have a post for our 2011 Alaskan Expedition up, located here:

    http://www.kevinsoffroad.com/north-to-alaska-expedition-trip/

    Safari-Style Hard-KOR Roof Rack for XJ Cherokees

    The product page on our website is here:
    Hard-KOR Safari-Style XJ Cherokee Roof Rack

    Here are more photos of the Safari Style Roof Rack we manufacture for the Jeep Cherokee XJ




    Spring Cleaning…Your Chance To Save On Used Parts!!

    THE “KEVIN IS A PACKRAT” SALE

    ALSO KNOWN AS

    “THE KOR SPRING CLEANING EVENT”

    We are filling our eBay store with a WHOLE BUNCH of used Jeep Grand Cherokee, Wrangler, Cherokee, and universal-fit parts that we’ve had laying around taking up space. NOW YOU GET TO BENEFIT FROM KEVIN’S (SOMEWHAT MENTALLY ILL AND TOTALLY UNHEALTHY) PACKRAT-LIKE TENANCIES!!

    Here is our KOR eBay store link:

    http://motors.shop.ebay.com/kevinsoffroad/m.html?_trksid=p4340.l2562

    Here are a few of the items we have up for sale:

    • Air Intake parts

    • Brake Lines

    • Wheel Spacers

    • Brake Pads

    • Ox Locker

    • Lube Locker

    • Shocks
    • Interior Parts from our ZJ

    • Electronics / Switches / Gauges

    • Electric Lock Motors / Solenoids

    • Motor Mounts

    • Wiper Motors

    • Window Regulators

    • Tow Hooks

    Here is our KOR eBay store link:

    http://motors.shop.ebay.com/kevinsoffroad/m.html?_trksid=p4340.l2562

    Click now so you don’t miss out on this once a …what?…half-decade event, lol.

    Kevin’s crazy pack-ratting is over! (temporarily, at least…maybe longer.)

    REMEMBER, PICK THEM UP NOW, BEFORE THEY ARE GONE!!

    Video for the absolute WORST song I’ve ever heard…

    This is, without a doubt, the worst song I’ve ever had the displeasure to watch on video. It literally will make your ears bleed.

    If this is considered part of the “Manufactured Pop” genre, then this producer is the equivalent of the Chinese manufacturing connection for the children’s toys at a half-off 99-cent store.

    This could be a fun post…if you have heard something you think is worse, embed a video or audio file in your comment below, or post a link

    You’re welcome for sharing, lol :-)

    Kevin

    Worst Song Ever

    $50 off the Beefy U-Turn Steering Setup

    U-Turn Steering Sale
    U-Turn Steering Upgrade for Grand Cherokee ZJ, Wrangler TJ, Cherokee XJ

    Contact Us

    sales@kevinsoffroad.com KevinsOffroad.com 602-841-3355
    3464 W. Earll Dr. Ste. C Phoenix, AZ 85017

     Sign up for our exclusive Facebook Specials by "Liking" our FanPage, and then check out our cool Jeep Videos on YouTube if you need to waste some time at work, lol. 

    Click below for our profiles

         

    Special U-Turn Steering Price

    Pick up this cross-over steering upgrade for your ZJ Grand Cherokee, XJ Cherokee or TJ Wrangler though the end of April 2011, and save $50!
     

    • Corrects steering problems found on factory steering components on lifted Jeeps.
    • Replaces Y-link and stops toe-in changes while you drive.
    • Upgrades strength, and protects you from breakage on the trail.
    • All Bolt-On, easy to install in your driveway in an afternoon.

    1.25″ OD 4130 Chromoly DOM tubing, which is radially-welded in a state-of-the-art fixture for perfect accuracy, and then heat-treated after the manufacturing process to ASSURE that it’s the toughest thing on the market that you can bolt to the front end of your Jeep.

    Click Here for Pricing and Detailed Information…

    KOR U-Turn Steering Upgrade Blow-Out Promotion

         

    KevinsOffroad.com, 3464 W. Earll Dr Suite C, Phoenix, AZ 85017 602-841-3355

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    Rubicon Express Closes Up

    A friend sent me this link today:

    http://www.rubiconexpress.com/

    As of 6:30pm, MST, 2/9/2011, it said…

    “To Our Loyal Customers and Friends,

    Rubicon Express is currently closed, pending reorganization. For the latest news and current information, please visit our blog at RubiconUSA.com or follow the “blog” link in the left column of this page.”

    Wow…that’s crazy.  This economy is a bear…no two ways about it.  Only the companies who are able to dodge and block, and reposition are the ones who are able to survive this slow-down in consumer spending, it seems.  I purchased a track bar from Rubicon Express back in probably 1994 or 1995…back when they had a 10 page catalog, and most of it was Teraflex and Currie parts that they resold.  They’ve been in the industry for a while.

    Anyway, I wish them well…I hope this reorganization goes well for them, and they come back putting out good quality US-built parts (but I have serious doubts…because VERY few (if any) of the “Large” companies in our industry are still using US-Based workers, unfortunately.)

    In a somewhat-related story, I stopped by Best Buy today looking for a cell phone cover, and noticed while I was there that they had a really tacky (non-corporate) spray-painted stencil sandwich-board sign in front that said “Big TV Sale Today”, in addition to two banners that read, “Trade in Your Used Video Games For Credit” and “We Tint Windows”.  With Wal*Mart increasing their electronics sale, I doubt that Best Buy will be around for long.  Their prices are REALLY out of line if you price the same thing out online (even including shipping), Wal*Mart, Sears, K-Mart, and even Radio Shack seems to have better prices!  Hell, they wanted 25% more for an off-brand snap-on cell phone cover, than my Verizon store wanted for a Motorola-branded one!  I think a good portion of their sales came from CDs (which ain’t no-body selling much of these days), and are attempting to make up for it by increasing their profit margins.

    Anyway, I wish Rubicon Express well.  Best Buy, I can’t offer the same sentiments toward, frankly.  I thought Circuit City did a FAR better job, and have turned up my nose at Best Buy since then.

    Kevin

    Protected: KOR Dealer Program

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    Alfa Romeo and Maserati on a Grand Cherokee Chassis? What??!!

    Posted Originally at WSJ.com : http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704170404575624561382205910.html

    Post your comments below

    By JEFF BENNETT

    LOS ANGELES—Chrysler Group LLC, which is trying to turn itself around with the help of its partner Fiat SpA, has plans to cooperate with the Italian company’s super-luxury brand Maserati.

    In 2013, Chrysler will begin producing a premium sport-utility vehicle to be sold as a Maserati in markets around the world, according to Sergio Marchionne, who serves as chief executive of both Chrysler and Fiat.

    The Maserati vehicle will be made from the underpinnings of Chrysler’s new Jeep Grand Cherokee and be assembled at its Jefferson North assembly plant in Detroit, Mr. Marchionne said in an interview at the Los Angeles auto show.

    “This is just a great architecture,” Mr. Marchionne said. “Why wouldn’t I put a Maserati on it?”

    The plan signals a broadening of the cooperation between Chrysler and Fiat, which has management control of the American auto maker and owns 20% of its stock.

    Under Mr. Marchionne’s turnaround plan for Chrysler, the company is preparing to launch a series of small cars based on vehicles developed by Fiat. It will also produce Fiat models that will be sold in the U.S., and help return Fiat’s Alfa Romeo brand to the U.S. market.

    A few Chrysler models are also supposed to be sold outside of North America under Fiat’s Lancia brand. The first will be the redesigned Chrysler 200 midsized sedan, Mr. Marchionne said.

    Cooperation between Chrysler and Maserati would add a new dimension to the ties between the U.S. auto maker and Fiat at a time when Chrysler is starting preparations for a possible public offering of stock in 2011.

    On Friday, the Obama administration’s auto czar, Ron Bloom, said it is unclear if the company will be ready for an IPO next year. But he added that “the company is on a good trajectory.”

    Mr. Bloom also said Mr. Marchionne briefs U.S. Treasury officials once or twice a month and gives notice on major decisions. The U.S. government financed Chrysler’s restructuring in bankruptcy court last year, and is a minority shareholder in the auto maker.

    Chrysler reported a net loss of $84 million for the third quarter but made money on an operating basis. Mr. Bloom said Chrysler’s financial performance has bested expectations and efforts to rejuvenate the company’s product line—considered a critical weakness—appear to be going well.

    “Our view on Chrysler at the moment is so far so good,” Mr. Bloom said in an interview.

    The Maserati will be built alongside the Grand Cherokee and Dodge Durango, possibly creating the need to hire workers for a third shift at the Chrysler plant, Mr. Marchionne said.

    Maserati, which was acquired by Fiat in 1993, is known for luxury sport sedans and sells such models as the Quattroporte along with the GranTurismo coupe and convertible. Maserari models start at $118,000, well above the Grand Cherokee’s starting price of $30,000.

    Mr. Marchionne first hinted at using the the Grand Cherokee architecture to produce other vehicles during a conference call earlier this month.

    “It would certainly give us a unique opportunity to try and use all the amount of work that’s gone on inside Chrysler,” he said in a conference call to discuss Chrysler’s third-quarter results. The basic architecture of the Grand Cherokee is “capable of supporting the content of a much higher-priced brand as Alfa or Maserati.”

    The new Grand Cherokee was launched last summer and has been well received by auto critics and dealers. The vehicle was developed in cooperation with Daimler AG, which owned Chrysler until 2007. The same architecture that Chrysler uses for the Grand Cherokee is also used by Daimler for its SUV, the M-Class, made in Alabama.

    Write to Jeff Bennett at jeff.bennett@dowjones.com

    ======================================================

    Kevin’s comments: So, what do you think about that?

    I’m thinking it’s a huge compliment to the guys who designed the chassis of the Grand Cherokee!  If the lowest cost Maserati is $118k, then the SUV version has to be what…$150k?  And, the ML is already running the same chassis and selling for $90k.  What a bargain we’re getting at $40k for the same running gear if it’s good enough for $100k vehicles.

    I also think this is going to open up the aftermarket substantially, being that there will be more demand for anti-sway bar upgrades, brakes, steering, and tire/wheel combos.  It also stands to reason the guy who’s buying $100-$150k SUVs may have a few extra bucks laying around for upgrades, and is willing to pay the price needed, however extravagant, which means that there will be more aftermarket manufacturers for the new Grand…especially high-end ones.  Also read as “choices”.

    Are we talking about bolt-on “European” -spec high-performance modifications for MLs and Maseratis that also fit the 2011 Jeep Grand Cherokee??  Kick ass!!  I’ll take mine with the SRT package, thank you very much.

    -Kevin

    2008 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited 4×4 w 25k miles

    We’re selling our well-loved but not very often driven 2008 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited 4×4.  It’s in EXTREMELY clean shape…never in an accident…infact, there is not one dent or door ding on her!  Oil changed regularly with Mobil 1 after the first 10k miles.  Everything works perfectly.

    We spent quite a bit of money adding the lift kit and offroad equipment:

    JKS ACOS  Front Coil Spring Spacers: $229
    Rubicon Unlimited Rear Coils $155
    Jeep Steel Front Winch Bumper $661
    Bilstein 5150 Remote Reservoir Shocks $440
    Rubicon 17″ Wheels $250
    JKS Front Adjustable Track Bar $160
    JKS Rear Adjustable Track Bar $160
    ARB Armored Differential Cover $175
    ProComp 35″ All-Terrain Tires $1500
    Totals $3730


    Kelley Blue Book says $22,870 in it’s current condition.  With more than $3,500  in upgrades, I think $23,500 is a good place to start negotiations.  What’s it worth to you to have a clean one-owner Jeep which has been regularly maintained, without any dents, and with a LOT of money spent on upgrades?  Give me a call and we can discuss it, and come up with a price that works for both of us.

    Kevin 480-559-9156  (We live in the West Central Corridor)

    SEMA Show 2010 Las Vegas Photos and Videos

    I’m out of town this week at the SEMA Show 2010 in Las Vegas, and wanted to share with you some of the action.  It’s a retro-rebuild feel here…lots of older cars and trucks, freshened up and repurposed…super cool!  If you see any photos you like, you can share them on Facebook by clicking below.


    Check out the show…





    Massive Tow Rig
    What an outstanding tow rig!!





    SEMA 2010 Las Vegas
    SEMA Show 2010





    Post Your Local Jeep Clubs Here

    This is about building local community, making friends who share Jeeping as a passion just like you do, and improving your bonds with your family by experiencing ADVENTURE together!!

    Eventually, I’ll categorize this page by state, but for now, just add a post with a city name, state, and a link to your local Jeep clubs that you’d like others to join up with.

    Keeping it exciting,

    Kevin

    PS:  I’ll start off…

    Please Help Us Track Down Bad Links

    As you’re surfing our site, and come across a link that doesn’t give you what you were looking for, would you be so kind to let us know by posting a comment below?  We want to give you the best content we can, and help you find what you’re searching for the FIRST time you arrive at our site, so if there is anything that doesn’t return you valuable information by clicking, please let us know what that is.  This would include 404 pages, links that work, but don’t give you the correct page, and so on.  As you probably already know, during the site changeover from the old, messy site to the new, easier to negotiate site, we moved a lot of pages, and don’t have everything arranged quite perfectly yet.

    Thank you for your help us make KOR an easier place to find what you’re looking for.

    Very Gratefully, Kevin and the KOR krew

    ProComp Bypass Shock EXP-4206 14″ Travel Bypass Shock Pair

    ProComp EXP-4206 Bypass Shocks

    We have TWO pairs of TWO each (FOUR TOTAL, priced above per pair) brand new ProComp 14″ Travel Medium-Valved Bypass shocks, which are brand new, in the box.  Retail is $175 each, and normal everyday website price is $149.97 each at Summit.com .  You pay only $142.50 each!  AND, our price not only includes FREE SHIPPING (a $25 value) but also Includes both reservoir clamp kits…the standard loop clamps for attaching the reservoir to the body or frame, and the upgraded 63013 sandwich clamps, which attach the reservoir to the shock body, which is an additional $40 value which is included in the price.  If you purchased these elsewhere, you’re paying $185 EACH after shipping, which is an $170 savings on the set of four.

    Click HERE to purchase

    If you’re running long arms and a lot of lift, and want the most flex you can possibly get under a ZJ or WJ, these shocks may work out great for you.

    Specs:

    • 14″ Travel Bypass loop/loop configuration
    • 35.17″ Extended Length
    • 21.17″ Compressed Length

    Click HERE to purchase

    If you’re wanting all four of them, add Quantity “2” to the cart.  Price above is the per-pair price.

    Click HERE to purchase

    Death Wobble – How To Fix Your Own Case of Death Wobble

     Death Wobble: How To Fix Your Own Case Of Dreaded Death Wobble

    (If you have questions or a comment… post it below, and we’ll answer you ASAP!)

    As you have already found out, ” Death Wobble ” is the horrible front end vibration that starts when one tire (usually the right tire first) hits a groove or bump in the pavement somewhere around 40~50mph.  Death Wobble is quite possibly the worst possible downside to having a coil-sprung front suspension on a vehicle with a track bar or panhard bar.  Vehicles affected by this design are the Jeep Cherokee XJ, the Jeep Grand Cherokee ZJ and WJ, TJ and JK Jeep Wrangler, and also include trucks like Toyota, Ford, and Dodge Ram (a page written specifically for the Dodge Wobble is located HERE), as well as early Ford Broncos.  Death Wobble is also extremely difficult to try to diagnose and fix, because it is actually caused by slop in the entire steering system as a whole, not by one component.  To diagnose and fix Death Wobble correctly, your mechanic needs to look for “play” everywhere in the steering and front suspension system, searching for anything that could have “play” in it.  It’s very time consuming to find a Death Wobble fix, and can be downright dangerous while you are in “testing phase”, trying to exorcise this demon from your Jeep or Truck.  This page is specific to the Jeep Death Wobble Problem and discusses Jeep Death Wobble Causes and Cures

    ________________________________________________________________

    For a more in-depth discussion and tutorial, I’ve written my first book on Death Wobble, entitled “Death Wobble: Causes and Cures“, which is available here:

    http://www.kevinsoffroad.com/cart/death-wobble-causes-and-cures-book-by-kevin-fell-p-1640/

    ________________________________________________________________

     

    The place I tell people to start, is with an overall visual inspection.  Spend 10 solid minutes under the

    Death Wobble Alignment
    Death Wobble – Front End Suspension Components – 4x4Xplor.com

    front end, visually inspecting each one of the steering components for shiny spots on steel, rubber, or polyeurthane, which is typically indicative of suspension components that are moving around when they are not supposed to be.  Pay CAREFUL attention to the track bar (also called a Panhard Bar inside and ouside the USA, as well as variant spellings (misspellings?) of  trackbar, tracbar, and trak-bar ).  The Track Bar is  often the culprit in many cases.  And, if any of your bolts are even the least bit loose, Death Wobble also can manifest itself and make your life a living hell, so check for looseness everywhere. 

    If everything appears to be “normal” on the underside of your Jeep or Truck, and you’ve verified the bolt tightness on both ends of the track bar, the next thing to do is to start with a front end alignment, making sure that caster (frequently misspelled as ” castor “) is set correctly as well as toe-in.  If you have been offroading and have bent your tie rod even slightly, that, also, will throw off your alignment.  Plus, it’s only $40 or so at your local alignment shop.  By the way, DO NOT let the alignment shop talk you into a four-wheel alignment, as this is only useful on vehicles with independent rear suspension in my experience, and since there are no adjustment points in the rear of a live-axle vehicle ANYWAY, you’re merely paying for a service that you won’t get by the time you leave the alignment shop.  Furthermore, if you have a lifted vehicle, make sure that the alignment shop you choose knows the variant specifications for lifted vehicles, and that they do NOT set it to the “default/stock” settings.  A good quality alignment shop familiar with lifted 4×4 vehicles will know these settings, and a poor quality shop will likely tell you that it doesn’t matter whether it’s lifted or not…and that they use the stock specs.  Walk away immediately, or hang up the phone and call the next shop, if they do.

    If you are now *certain* that the front end alignment that it’s set correctly, and that you have not replaced ANY other front end components recently (including tires or wheels) that may have caused the oscillation to begin, I tell people the next most suspect thing is the factory front track bar.  Over time, the tie rod end on the upper portion of the Panhard or track bar (some applications like the WJ Grand Cherokee, the Ford Truck and the Dodge Ram have a rubber bushing configuration instead, which also wears out) develops “play” in it due to wear and miles on the vehicle.  The same findings often goes for the lower end bushing, which has a rubber or polyurethane isolator bushing in it, and this “slop” will allow the Dreaded Death Wobble oscillation to occur. Aftermarket trackbars generally come with urethane bushings that allow a LOT less “play” (with respect to movement / crush) than the factory rubber bushings do.  The problem with most aftermarket track bars for the Jeep is that they also come with either a Heim joint, Johnny Joint, or tie rod end on the upper end of the Track Bar, which works fine for a while, but wears out over time, leaving you right back where you started, with a large mess in your shorts, a temporarily deafened right ear (from the wife screaming for dear life, or, quite possibly at YOU, for buying the Jeep to begin with, lol), and an overall high level of frustration with your entire rig in general…which doesn’t often lead into a smooth, stress-free trip. The reason why I developed our Track Bar Conversion for XJ Cherokees and ZJ Grand Cherokees is to eliminate that problematic (and expensive to have to replace when it wears out) previously mentioned joint, as well as for the additional flex benefits you get out of it.  If you are running an Cherokee XJ or Grand Cherokee ZJ with or without Death Wobble, and it has more than 1.5″ of lift, I highly recommend you check it out. Many aftermarket track bars as well as the stock track bar are completely ineffective in managing Death Wobble due to their “effective angle of operation” particularly if you are above say 2 or 3 inches of lift.  Keep the thought in the back of your mind, that another alignment is necessary after replacing ANY front end components, especially if Death Wobble still remains.  Sometimes you might get lucky and don’t need one…but be forewarned.

    A complementary product we have found to work VERY well in getting rid of Death Wobble is our exclusive Hard-KOR brand SuperDurometer Track Bar Bushings, which are also available for the Track Bar Conversion, and fit most “normal” sized 1.6″ ID by 1.25″ deep aftermarket and factory track bar end loops, which would originally take a 1.6″ OD rubber cartridge bushing.  Our SuperDurometer Track Bar Bushings are about TWO TIMES as hard as the typical polyurethane bushings that come in most aftermarket track bars, (which typically are made by Daystar or Energy Suspension for most of the various aftermarket manufacturers).  Polyurethane bushings are also one of the least expensive replacement parts in the steering components, so they make sense to try first.

    The next thing to check is your steering stabilizer.  I recommend AT THE MINIMUM, replacing the stabilizer (or dampener, as it’s sometimes called) at the same time as whatever worn components that you find under the front end, as this “combination punch” is very often more effective than the change caused by each of the parts alone.  Death Wobble shakes EVERYTHING, and loosens up OTHER components at the same time.  I’ve found that replacing the stabilizer by itself often times doesn’t eliminate death wobble directly, but that it often helps with some other poor handling characteristics, which cause the onset of Death Wobble (such as wandering, for instance) and a new one seems to tighten up the entire steering system.  I ONLY recommend our Hard-KOR Steering Stabilizer or the OME SD40 stabilizer , because either one seems to be tighter and work better for stopping Death Wobble than the other manufacturers of steering dampeners and stabilizers on the market (and I’ve tried them all, trying like hell to get rid of a WJ Death Wobble problem years ago).  They are also the most heavy duty that I’m aware of.  These two stabilizers are the ONLY two that I recommend to ANYONE who is having trouble with Death Wobble, and it’s also one of the least expensive parts to replace in your steering system to attempt to remedy the problem.

    Here are some other steering components to check over for looseness or improper movement:

    • Tie Rod Ends (all four, plus the upper track bar end)

    • Upper and Lower Ball Joints

    • Track Bar Mounting Bracket Bolts

    • Steering Box Bolts

    • Track Bar Ends

    Another product that we’ve developed to assist with Death Wobble, is our XJ Cherokee Steering Box Brace for the Jeep Cherokee XJ, and our ZJ Grand Cherokee Steering Box Brace for the V8 and 6 Cyl Jeep Grand Cherokee ZJ, which holds the steering gear box tightly on those two models, allowing the additional stresses of running larger-than-stock tires be directed to BOTH frame rails, rather than depending on the three little bolts that hold the gear to the frame, which get loose and if they do, will snap the gear box ears off the box, and leave you stranded somewhere you don’t want to be. Another source of Death Wobble is over-inflated tires (you should have somewhere around 30psi or so in stock sized tires, and far less pressure the larger your tires are.  See Boyle’s Law and consider how much more volume of air is inside your 33″ tires compared to stock-sized tires.  As an example, I run around 18psi in my 37″ tires).

    The last thing that I can mention that has caused Death Wobble in the past is hub bearings.  If there is a little slop in them over the years and miles, they MAY indeed help to cause the oscillation as well.  I mentioned them last because they are the most expensive to replace, and probably least likely to be the ROOT of the problem (though they might be a component adding to the problem). While you have the front end apart, you should consider adding some offset upper ball joints to your Jeep if you’re running a lift kit, in order to return the caster back to what a stock Jeep would be if you are running say 4″ of lift or more.  Be aware that on 4×4 models (especially full-time 4×4 models), by NOT changing the ball joints to the offset type, you add more vibration to the front drive shaft since you are also turning your pinion angle downward in conjunction with every caster angle increase.  In other words, you can’t have one without the other, and on the full-time 4×4 models, you’ll get a little vibration at highway speeds by NOT doing so.  Compared to Dreaded Death Wobble, however, this is a VERY small price to pay, lol.

    Hopefully this short checklist gets you started on the right foot and helps to cure your Death Wobble problems, and gives you a permanent Death Wobble Fix.

    Very Sincerely,

    -=Kevin=-

     

    Additional Resources:

    • KGO-TV San Francisco: Chrysler Acknowledges “Death Wobble”

    Identify Your Jeep’s Letter Code

    (If you have questions or a comment… post it below, and we’ll answer you ASAP!)


    Chrysler gives a two letter code to each model, and we Jeepers use that code to tell the Jeeps apart.  I’ll ask, “Do you have a WJ?” and you’ll need to tell me, “No, I have a ZJ”.  If you’re new to Jeeping and you’re not sure how to tell what code letters your Jeep is, here is a chart to keep it simple:


    CJ 5, 6, 7, & 8 All Years Just CJ & #
    Cherokee All Years “XJ”
    Comanchee All Years “MJ”
    Grand Cherokee 1999~2004 = “WJ” 1993~1998 = “ZJ”
    Liberty All Years “KJ”
    Wrangler 1987~1996 = “YJ” 1997~2005 = “TJ”


    Or check out wikipedia’s list: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Jeep_vehicles

    Install Instructions for KOR-2201 Rear ACOS for ZJ Grand Cherokee

    The Rear ACOS for the ZJ Grand Cherokee has two separate components to it: The spring post extensions, and the ACOS itself:

    Step 1) Install the Spring Post Extensions:
    This one is pretty much a slam-dunk. All you need to do is slide them up and over the existing spring posts in the rear of the ZJ after removing the rear springs, and then keep gravity away from them. Your coil springs will exert absolutely zero sideways motion on them, so it’s a really simple and easy job. They can be affixed to the ZJ’s rear spring posts in the following manner:

    1A) Remove the factory rubber spring isolators by sliding them down over the spring post. Keep them around somewhere out of the way, but you will not reuse them for this project.

    1B) You can use Permatex, RTV, or any other sort of epoxy to hold them on. Clean both surfaces first, apply liberally, and hold them in position until the sealant congels.

    1C) You can tack-weld them into position, but you’ll need to clean off the underbody coating in order to get the welder to get a good ground when the electrode touches the factory spring post as well as where the ground clamp it attached to.

    1D) You can drill a small hole and insert a pan-head sheet metal screw, but the screw head may conflict with the spring wraps, depending on how tight they are at the top.

    1E) You can take a 3-lb sledge hammer and hammer the end of the tubes *slightly* oval, and then hammer it into position up and over the spring post.

    Step 2) Install the ACOS Spacers over the Spring Post Extensions:
    Again, very simple and easy.

    2A) Just slide the spacers up over the spring post extensions, so that the seat fully on the upper body, where the factory spring isolator would have been located, had you not removed it in Step 1A.

    2B) Locate the “recessed” area of the upper ring, and make sure the recessed surface faces outward, so that it clears the pinch seam. The isolators you took off will give you a good indication of how the ACOS is to set.

    2C) Tap the ACOS into position, or hold it with one hand and re-install the coil spring.

    NOTE: There is no need to affix the ACOS to the spring post extension, because gravity will keep everything together. If you are jumping the Jeep (HIGHLY NOT RECOMMENDED, lol), make sure the shock length extended is not any longer than an inch from where the coil spring comes unseated. The ACOS will slide up and down on the spring post extension about an inch or two without coming dislodged, if you are running longer-than-needed shocks, but make sure the shocks don’t allow the ACOS to slide off of the spring post.

    2D) If using factory ZJ rear coils, you MAY have to open up the “pigtail” on the coil springs slightly, to get them over the threaded section of the ACOS spacer. This is normal for factory ZJ coils, and can easily be remedied with a right angle grinder or hack saw, clearancing only the tip of the coil spring where it contacts the ACOS threaded section and the internal “locating ring” once the spring fully seats.

    That’s it. Really simple. Done deal.

    JK Wrangler Steering Stabilizer Relocation Bracket

    FREE SHIPPING JK Wrangler Steering Stabilizer BracketSteering Stabilizer Relocation Bracket for Jeep JK Wranglers

    (IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS, PLEASE POST THEM BELOW FOR A PROMPT REPLY)

    Thank you, Jeep, for locating the steering stabilizer on my JK Unlimited way down BELOW the axle tube…nearly rubbing the pavement it’s so low! The absolute LAST place I want to lose maneuverability is while I’m out offroading somewhere; where repairing the problem is WAY more difficult than in my shop near all my tools!

    Unfortunately, mangling the steering stabilizer affects Wrangler JK owners WAY more often than necessary, until now. The factory mounting location of the steering stabilizer is immediately forward and several inches below the front axle tube, leaving the steering stabilizer prone to damage, and worse, will lock up your steering if you bend the shaft of the stabilizer.

    Steering Stabilizer Relocation Bracket (FREE SHIPPING THIS WEEK ONLY)

    JKS Manufacturing’s Jeep specialists have developed a solution which optimizes steering stabilizer location, while increases it’s performance. Our Steering Stabilizer Relocation Bracket is an EXTREMELY heavy-duty bracket that positions the stabilizer in a much safer high-clearance location, where miserable ground clearance and being concerned with banging it into obstacles are no longer a problem for you…all of which means less “Did that guy break AGAIN??!!” overheard coming from near the head of the group.

    Steering Stabilizer Relocation Bracket (FREE SHIPPING THIS WEEK ONLY)

    Our Steering Stabilizer Relocation Bracket is crafted from premium 0.25” steel: precision computer cuts…mechanically formed and folded, all to provide a perfect fit while offering incredible strength. The extremely  heavy-duty stabilizer mounting stud is robotically radially and rosette welded to the bracket, and includes all the hardware to ensure a secure and MUCH safer connection than the way it came from the factory. As a finishing touch and with the attention to detail you expect from JKS, the entire bracket is coated with a protective zinc plating, who provides an attractive and durable surface, laughing in the face of oxidation.

    Steering Stabilizer Relocation Bracket (FREE SHIPPING THIS WEEK ONLY)

    Our heavy-duty relocation bracket is a bolt-on installation using the high-quality fasteners supplied, and is a perfect choice for Jeep JK Wrangler owners who seek a more protected location for their stabilizer. Optionally, our bracket can be installed using a weld-on installation, fusing the bracket permanently to multiple points on the axle bracketry, which will also reinforce the weak factory trackbar bracket, (ever seen one of these ripped off the axle?  Not a pretty sight!), which also serves as an alternative to our Front Trackbar Brace (PN OGS161) on vehicles without an inverted drag link.

    Steering Stabilizer Relocation Bracket (FREE SHIPPING THIS WEEK ONLY)

    Pick one up today, and protect your investment, cause good steering stabilizers aren’t cheap, and bending your junk NEVER adds to an otherwise good time on the trail.

    FREE SHIPPING OGS162 JK Wrangler Steering Stabilizer Bracket

    WJ Grand Cherokee Secondary Steering Stabilizer – Death Wobble Cures

    (If you have questions or a comment… post it below, and we’ll answer you ASAP!)


    Have you done everything you can to get rid of the dreaded Death Wobble, and are even more frustrated now than you were previously?  We’ve done a lot of Death Wobble cures here at the shop, and have found that for some reason, the WJs seem to have a higher propensity for Death Wobble than the XJs and ZJs do.  We think this is because the steering stabilizer is mounted between the tie-rod and the axle on the WJ Grand Cherokee, rather than between the drag link and the axle like on the XJ/ZJ/TJ Jeeps.  Anyway, below is the kit to add a second steering stabilizer between the drag link and the track bar, which has cured HUNDREDS of WJ Grand Cherokee cases of “uncurable” Death Wobble in the last 6 years that we’ve designed and begun selling it.  IT CAN ALSO BE USED TO RELOCATE YOUR PRIMARY STEERING STABILIZER LOCATION UPWARD IF YOU DON’T HAVE DEATH WOBBLE, BUT ARE TIRED OF IT GETTING SMASHED ON THE ROCKS.  There are two kits: the 1.00″ OD Anti- Death Wobble kit for FACTORY-size trackbars, and the Anti- Death Wobble kit for the 1.25″ OD Heavy Duty track bar, similar in size to the adjustable JKS model sold HERE.  Ideally you’d upgrade the factory WJ trackbar at the same time to the extra-beefy JKS model if you have not already done so, because it REALLY helps keep the axle firmly planted, rather than oscillating back and forth under your Grand Cherokee when you hit a bump and the entire front end starts shaking like crazy.  You can use this Anti- Death Wobble kit with either the factory drag link or the Hard-KOR upgraded drag link we sell HERE.  If you have the cash, there is no substitute for the combination package of the Anti- Death Wobble kit (secondary stabilizer), a new primary steering stabilizer, a new JKS track bar with Hard-KOR bushings and a new Hard-KOR Tie-rod and Drag-link.

    I just installed the Dual SS and thought id let ya know that it did its job! awesome product will be doing business again! Blake, Deland, FL

    Kevin, I have a 99 WJ with a Tera Flex 4-inch lift on it.  I have had death wobble for several months now that I could not fix.  I replaced tie rods, tires, track bar, had the caster angle changed, replaced the steering stabilizer, and more.  Nothing was working. I had already replaced the original stabilizer so I went ahead and left that one on.  I figured two would be better. I purchased a Steering Stabilizer relocation kit and dampener from you, and the problem is fixed.  I tried everything else first when I should have just tried this. Maybe if someone else reads what I went through, they wont have to go through it as well. You have a new customer for life. Thanks a bunch.
    A satisfied customer, Scott M., Westminster, CO

    I just wanted to let you guys know the JKS Track Bar and your WJ dual stabilizer kit worked better than I could have dreamed!  Before when I hit bumps the steering would shudder and, if above 40 m.p.h., there was a high chance of severe death wobble. This is great!  I have been living with the problem since I bought my WJ 2 years ago. 30k miles of agony later I saw this kit.  God Bless You Kevin’s!  My jeep drives like it always should have. Thanks again, Tom C., Port Angeles, WA

     

     

    The kit comes with the following:

    • Your choice of a new Hard-KOR or Old Man Emu steering stabilizer
    • Two Heavy Duty clamps (size varies per track bar OD)
    • Mounting hardware for both ends of the stabilizer
    Due to the seemingly ever-increasing cost of the OME products, I spent some time sourcing a private-label steering stabilizer that we’ve found works every bit as well as the OME stabilizer does, and better.  We tried many different manufacturer’s stabilizers out on our Jeeps, including all of the big names and some of the small names, and we found that there was only one manufacturer who could make a steering stabilizer that equalled the OME in quality and in dampening, and did NOT offer a steel “rock guard” (which we’ve found to get smashed on rocks and bent so badly that steering is majorly hampered), so we struck a deal with them, buying them in bulk to drive down your price.  Our new Hard-KOR stabilizer is equal OR BETTER in every way to the OME stabilizer, and we are VERY happy to not only offer you a product that’s as high a quality, but also, costs you less.  And, possibly best of all, it comes in white, lol.  It’s a win-win situation for you!! 

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Anyway, I have added in the Hard-KOR Stabilizer to our pricing below, and know that you’re going to love the way it feels.  If not, no risk…just send it on back to me and I’ll give you a full refund less shipping.  That’s how strongly I feel about it.   -Kevin-

    Like all of the products you’ll find on our website, we’ve tested and replaced part after part until we’ve found the most desirable one for a particular application on the market to sell here on our website.  The KOR and OME steering stabilizers are hands-down the clear and distinct winner when it comes to a controlled ride and improved resistance to Death Wobble, irrespective of what ANYONE else says, and we know this because we’ve tested them all. 

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Designed to reduce the effect of wheel “flutter” and improve the feel, handling and control of the vehicle, our Hard-KOR steering stabilizers will also reduce the aggressive jerking of the steering wheel over rough roads without affecting steering wheel on-center return. Steering stabilizers are usually fitted forward of the front differential making them prone to rocks and other damage. Old Man Emu stabilizers feature a twin tube design and heavy gauge steel stone guard.  A can of spray paint will allow you to paint it to match the scheme on your Jeep if you aren’t a fan of “safety yellow”, lol.

     

    NOTE 1: OME raised prices April 2007, Oct 2007, March 2008, and May 2008

    Install Instructions HERE

    Currently we do not offer the hardware kit separately.

    S/H costs: add $2 for UPS residential surcharge or it can’t be delivered to a residential address.

    Hard-KOR Secondary Steering Stabilizer Kit

    OME Secondary Steering Stabilizer Kit

    Clayton Offroad’s WJ Grand Cherokee Long Arm Systems

    (If you have questions or a comment… post it below, and we’ll answer you ASAP!)



    Do you yearn for more lift on your WJ Grand to run that next larger tire size, but know that you’re short little factory-length control arms are maxed out on angle, resulting in a jittery ride and/or Death Wobble?  Thanks to a recent partnership with an industry leading Long-Arm kit manufacturer (Clayton’s Offroad), we are able to offer you a Long Arm kit for your ’99>’04 WJ Grand Cherokee.  Does the thought of driving your WJ over rail road tracks send chills of fear up your spine?  Have you lost fillings when driving through road construction?  Does your WJ go into convulsions when you hit a seam or pothole in the pavement?  If so, then it’s time for a Clayton Offroad long arm kit, my friend!!!  Clayton long arm kits completely re-establish more correct geometry for your leading and trailing control arms, allowing a pillow-smooth ride over paved highways and offroad trails alike, as well as articulation galore.  Imagine “floating” over the sections of washboard road that used to make your entire WJ shake and chatter.  The Clayton Long Arm Kit re-establishes NEW control arm locations, fitting your WJ with longer control arms to reduce the control arm angle, so that the energy of the road imperfections are now transmitted directly into the springs and shock absorbers, where they belong…rather than being transmitted up the lower and upper stock control arms due to the poorly-placed control arm mounts on the “frame”.  This becomes desirable on anything more than around 2.5-3.0-inches of lift, and necessary around 4.5-inches of lift.  You’ll NOT BELIEVE the ride quality difference between Clayton Offroad long arms and ANY aftermarket short arms on a WJ Grand Cherokee lifted more than 3.5″, and these Clayton Offroad packages also include an upgraded crossmember for drivers who find themselves belly-up on rocks.  The Clayton kit also includes a triangulation of the rear axle upper control arms so that there is no need to run a rear track bar, which was necessary on earlier Grand Cherokee models, and eliminates the part that makes the Jeep rock side-to-side when you hit speed-bumps. The Clayton Offroad Long Arm kit works even better if you add on a beefy upgraded Addco anti-sway bar (available below) to allow more precise cornering as well as a quicker response to your steering input through the steering wheel.

    Kevin, just wanted to give you a huge thanks on helping me out with the long arm purchase… Its now sitting in my garage waiting to be installed. Send my thanks to Cassie as well. You and your crew are a dying bread that shows excellent customer service. I have had my fair share of dealings with other offroad shops and no other has met the quality you have shown. Perhaps one day I’ll see you on the trails! Thanks again!  Mike Naglieri, Fountain Hills, AZ

    All Clayton Offroad “Bare-Bones” kits come with the following items: New control arm mounts, eight new adjustable-length control arms, Clayton’s rear triangulated upper arm assembly, a new beefy crossmember, and addresses Death Wobble issues.  You will need to source your own springs, shocks, track bar, etc, and are good from 4″>8″ of lift.


    All Clayton Offroad “Packaged” kits come with EVERYTHING in the “Bare-Bones” kits above, and also includes the following add-ons: a Hard-KOR adjustable front track bar with a set of upgraded Super-Durometer bushings for increased Death Wobble resistance, four new Clayton’s Offroad 6″ lift coil springs, JKS Manufacturing anti-sway bar disconnects, and a lifetime warranty against bending the control arms through Clayton’s Offroad.

    Shock Absorbers are NOT included with this kit. You can order them separately online, via THIS LINK

    Install Instructions HERE


    This suspension product requires welding it onto and/or modifications to your vehicle’s frame. For your safety as well and to ensure the system’s durability and optimum performance it is recommended that installation is performed by an experienced and qualified welder or 4×4 shop. Installation procedures should be followed closely.

    WJ Long Arm Kits

    WJ Grand Cherokee Ultimate Leveling Kit – 3/4″ Spacer Lift

    (If you have questions or a comment… post it below, and we’ll answer you ASAP!)


    Just looking for a little boost and keeping the same stock sized tires?  Does the rear set higher and you’d like to level it out?  Here’s some 3/4″ spacers for WJ Grand Cherokees that will work to set the front end or rear end slightly taller than they are now.  Generally speaking, you’ll not need longer shocks for these spacers unless your shocks are too short for your Jeep already.  However, if you ARE in the market for new shocks and a lift at the same time, check out this LINK.  Click HERE for instructions.

    For reasons unbeknownst to me, Jeep decided to change the upper and lower mounts on the rear shocks from “standard”, which has worked well for probably 50 years, to “WJ-style”, which requires a smaller length axle-side sleeve and longer length frame-side sleeve in order to work with the stock mounts.  When replacing stock WJ shocks with aftermarket shocks, please order up a WJ Shock Kit, listed below (which comes with four new bolts) so that you don’t have “thumps” going on back there.  The part number is KOR-1012 and comes as a set of four.  Installation instructions are HERE.


    3/4″ (.750″) Lift for WJs

    Add-On Options for WJs (shipping addl.)

    WJ Grand Cherokee Hard-KOR Front Bumper and Rear Bumpers

    Check Our Our WJ Grand Cherokee Bumpers in our shopping cart HERE

    Front WJ Grand Cherokee Bumper – Incline style from KevinsOffroad.com

    (If you have questions or a comment… post it below, and we’ll answer you ASAP!)

    Have you been looking for a unique set of bumpers for your WJ Grand Cherokee?

    We have what might possibly be the best bumpers on the market. I don’t say that to brag. I have actually beat both the tube-type prerunner-style AND the plate steel Stealth-style mercilessly on the rocks over the last five years on my own Grand Cherokee, and have had no issues whatsoever, other than scratched powdercoating.

    These bumpers are built to the Extreme: rock-bashable, high-clearance, and the fronts allows the mounting of a winch. Protect the front and rear of your WJ from a disaster with a rock or tree today. Our Grand Cherokee bumpers are CAD designed for us, are bent out of THICK 3/16″ plate steel, (which is 50% thicker than most bumpers on the market), built with some of the best machinery available on the market. They are mounted with the VERY BEST mounting system available, which sandwiches the weak unibody framerails on top and bottom, rather than how other aftermarket bumpers are made, mostly to reduce cost, I expect.

    We also keep the unnecessary weight down: 100lbs average, and even holds a 15k rated winch.

    Shipping is via Truck Freight (too large to go via UPS), and ranges from $125 to $250 depending on how close to Phoenix, AZ you are. We’d rather ship to your business, as there is a $70 residential surcharge if you have us ship it to a house rather than a zoned-business address.

    Light tabs can be drilled and mounted in the front section, but is discouraged due to the turbulence the lights will create, possibly causing your Jeep to overheat in some instances.

    A note from Kevin about front and rear bumpers and rear tire carrier design.

    When deciding on a bumper for your Jeep make sure that you take into account some of the unforeseen issues.

    1) Does the tire carrier hold the tire in a way to reduce blind spots and maximize visibility out the rear? Our carrier mounts on the driver’s side, in your natural blind-spot, so that you can see both over your right shoulder AND still see out the rear view mirror, which is mostly impossible with nearly all other carriers on the market who put the carrier in the middle or to the right of the rear window.

    2) How is the tire carrier mounted? Can it withstand a washboard road with the weight of a 35″ tire on a steel wheel mounted on it? Our tire carrier uses a patented cam-latch, which utilizes an easy-to-open lever which puts constant tension on the latch and hasp assembly which completely eliminates rattles from your carrier. And, you can actually lift the entire rear end of the Jeep off the ground with a forklift from OUR tire carrierhttp://kevinsoffroad.com/.how’s that for strong?

    3) What sort of hinge is included? Ours uses twin 3/4″ Heim joints, which not only has over 12,000 lbs. of radial load capability EACH (there are two. That’s 24,000 lbs. total), but are also easily replaceable if they wear over time, and you are also able to fine-tune the height of the carrier up and down by threading the heim joint in and out. Also, you can completely remove the carrier from the bumper very easily if you wanted to.

    4) Our bumpers are built with 1/4″ ultra-thick steel plate in the center sections (between the frame mounts for added rigidity) and 3/16″ thick steel plate everywhere else, which is more than 50% thicker than the more well-known brands of bumper. Have you ever seen a (well-known brand) front winch bumper bend in the center from a heavy winch pull? I have, and that’s why we use 1/4″ and 3/16″ steel with fortified 3/8″ thick frame rail mounts. This bumper ain’t going ANYWHERE once you mount it up, winch or no.

    5) Our bumpers allow for the best approach angle and departure angle currently available in ANY aftermarket Grand Cherokee bumper manufacturer, ’cause that’s how we roll, playa.

    6) Our winch is inserted inside the front bumper, all the way down, so as to not give you overheating problems like some of the other aftermarket bumpers have been known to cause.


    D-ring tabs for the stealth WJ

    bumper are a $45.97 upgrade, and I highly recommend them.





    WJ Grand Cherokee Rear Bumper




    WJ Grand Cherokee Rear Bumper with Tire Carrier - SEMA 2009





    Grand Cherokee WJ Bumper w/ Tire Carrier
    Hard-KOR Roof Rack and Stealth Bumpers on Display at SEMA 2009





    WJ Rear Bumper - Grand Cherokee Bumpers
    Stealth WJ Rear Bumper - Grand Cherokee Bumper - SEMA 2009





    SEMA 2009 Grand Cherokee Bumper WJ Rear
    Jeep Grand Cherokee Bumper WJ Rear - SEMA 2009






    WJ Front Bumper With Stinger Light Bar
    WJ Front Bumper With Stinger Light Bar






    WJ Front Bumper - Stealth Style with light bar
    WJ Front Bumper - Stealth Style with light bar





    Stealth WJ Grand Cherokee Front Bumper
    WJ Grand Cherokee Bumpers - Front with light hoop






    Grand Cherokee Front Bumper - WJ Front with light bar
    Grand Cherokee Front Bumper - WJ Front with light bar




    S/H costs: By Truck Freight only. A business with a loading dock is $60~$80 cheaper than a residence.

    THINK IN BULK: Buying two bumpers at once reduces your shipping cost by around 40%.

    Two bumpers on a pallet only costs about 20% more than a single bumper on a pallet to the same zip code!

    ALL BUMPERS COME NON-POWDERCOATED.

    Krylon spray paint works well, and so does POR-15. Even if you decide you want professional painting or powdercoating, you can probably have the bumpers powdercoated AFTER they arrive locally for less than I can charge you to do them. Do some price comparisons before ordering. Just trying to save you some money.

    -Kevin-

    For Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) about specific details on our bumpers, click HERE

    (all bumpers fit 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, and 2004 WJ model

    Jeep Grand Cherokees)

    HARD-KOR Stealth Front Bumper for WJ Jeep Grand Cherokees

    HARD-KOR Stealth Rear Bumper for WJ Jeep Grand Cherokees

    ZJ Grand Cherokee Bumpers – Hard-KOR Front and Rear

    (If you have questions or a comment… post it below, and we’ll answer you ASAP!)


    Have you been looking for a unique set of bumpers for your ZJ Grand Cherokee? We have what might possibly be the best Grand Cherokee bumpers on the market. I don’t say that to brag.  I have actually beat both the ZJ tube-type prerunner-style bumper AND the plate steel ZJ Stealth-style bumper mercilessly on the rocks over the last five years, and have had no issues whatsoever, other than scratched powdercoating.

    These ZJ bumpers are built to the Extreme: rock-bashable, high-clearance, and the fronts allows the mounting of a winch. Protect the front and rear of your Grand Cherokee from a disaster with a rock or tree today. Our ZJ Grand Cherokee bumpers are CAD designed for us, are bent out of THICK 3/16″ plate steel, (which is 50% thicker than most bumpers on the market), built with some of the best machinery available on the market. They are mounted with the VERY BEST mounting system available, which sandwiches the weak unibody framerails on top and bottom, rather than how other aftermarket bumpers are made, mostly to reduce cost, I expect.

    We keep the weight down, too: 100lbs average, and even holds a 15k rated winch.

    Shipping is via Truck Freight (too large to go via UPS), and ranges from $125 to $250 depending on how close to Phoenix, AZ you are. We’d rather ship to your business, as there is a $70 residential surcharge if you have us ship it to a house rather than a zoned-business address.

    Light tabs can be drilled and mounted in the front section, but is discouraged due to the turbulence the lights will create, possibly causing your Jeep to overheat in some instances.

    A note from Kevin about front and rear bumpers and rear tire carrier design.

    When deciding on a Grand Cherokee bumper for your Jeep ZJ make sure that you take into account some of the unforeseen issues.

    1) Does the tire carrier hold the tire in a way to reduce blind spots and maximize visibility out the rear? Our carrier mounts on the driver’s side, in your natural blind-spot, so that you can see both over your right shoulder AND still see out the rear view mirror, which is mostly impossible with nearly all other Grand Cherokee tire carriers on the market who put the carrier in the middle or to the right of the rear window.

    2) How is the tire carrier mounted? Can it withstand a washboard road with the weight of a 35″ tire on a steel wheel mounted on it? That’s up to 150lbs in some cases.just rattling around back there on the bumper! Our tire carrier uses a patented cam-latch, which utilizes an easy-to-open lever which puts constant tension on the latch and hasp assembly which completely eliminates rattles from your carrier. And, you can actually lift the entire rear end of the Jeep off the ground with a forklift from OUR tire carrier. how’s that for strong?

    3) What sort of hinge is included? Our ZJ bumper uses twin 3/4″ Heim joints, which not only has over 12,000 lbs. of radial load capability EACH (there are two.that’s 24,000 lbs. total), but are also easily replaceable if they wear over time, and you are also able to fine-tune the height of the carrier up and down by threading the heim joint in and out. Also, you can completely remove the carrier from the bumper very easily if you wanted to.

    4) Our bumpers are built with 1/4″ ultra-thick steel plate in the center sections (between the frame mounts for added rigidity) and 3/16″ thick steel plate everywhere else, which is more than 50% thicker than the more well-known brands of bumper. Have you ever seen a (well-known brand) front Grand Cherokee winch bumper BEND IN THE CENTER during a heavy winch pull? I have, with my own eyes, and that’s why we use 1/4″ and 3/16″ steel with fortified 3/8″ thick frame rail mounts. This bumper ain’t going ANYWHERE once you mount it up, winch or no.

    5) Our ZJ Grand bumpers allow for the best approach angle and departure angle currently available in ANY aftermarket Grand Cherokee bumper manufacturer, ’cause that’s how we roll, playa.

    6) Our winch is inserted inside the front bumper, all the way down, so as to not give you overheating problems like some of the other aftermarket bumpers have been known to cause.


    D-ring tabs for the stealth ZJ bumper are a $45.97 upgrade, and I highly recommend them.

    Also available are our Pre-Runner Style bumpers, which are nearly as beefy, but are a tad lighter. Click on the images below for a larger photo.


    S/H costs: By Truck Freight only. A business with a loading dock is $60~$80 cheaper than a residence.

    THINK IN BULK: Buying two bumpers at once reduces your shipping cost by around 40%.

    Two bumpers on a pallet only costs about 20% more than a single bumper on a pallet to the same zip code!

    ALL BUMPERS COME NON-POWDERCOATED.

    Krylon spray paint works well, and so does POR-15. Even if you decide you want professional painting or powdercoating, you can probably have the bumpers powdercoated AFTER they arrive locally for less than I can charge you to do them. Do some price comparisons before ordering. Just trying to save you some money.

    -Kevin-

    For Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) about specific details on our bumpers, click HERE

    (all bumpers fit 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, and 1998 ZJ Grand Cherokees)

    HARD-KOR Stealth Front Bumper for ZJ model Jeep Grand Cherokees

    HARD-KOR Stealth Rear Bumper for ZJ model Jeep Grand Cherokees

    Tube-Style Front PreRunner Bumper for ZJ model Jeep Grand Cherokees

    Tube-Style Rear PreRunner Bumper for ZJ model Jeep Grand Cherokees

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    ZJ Grand Cherokee Tow Points and Radiator Support

    (If you have questions or a comment… post it below, and we’ll answer you ASAP!)




    ZJ Grand Cherokee Tow Points and Radiator Support
    ZJ Grand Cherokee Tow Points and Radiator Support



    Are you missing factory tow hooks or looking to free up some ground clearance and approach angle?  Have you hit your cheap factory radiator support one too many times and dented it?  How does two additional inches of ground clearance under the radiator sound to you?  I’ve designed a replacement radiator support that tucks up out of harm’s way and will allow trimming of the front bumper to gain back massive amounts of approach angle (typically 10°~15°) and keeps your radiator from getting damaged at the same time!  Most importantly, the kit also includes snatch points, which alone would cost you around $100 + shipping if your Jeep didn’t come from the UpCountry Package from the factory. There are other aftermarket tow hook manufacturers selling factory-style tow points for $100 that are not NEAR as strong as our 1/4″ thick redundant bracing (pulls off both frame rails at the same time, rather than putting all the forces on one hook separately).  To the best of my knowledge, this is the beefiest ZJ tow point (and ONLY fortified radiator support) on the market.

    After installing this item under your ZJ, another huge benefit is that now you’ll also be able to avoid off-axle pulls, which sometimes results in this sort of nonsense. Have a look at this poor sap who decided NOT to purchase tow points for his XJ Cherokee…

    “Here’s a posting on our forum that I put up last night mentioning the incident I spoke to you on the phone about and how your radiator support saved the front of my ZJ. 

      Some one posted a few pics of the ordeal. Maybe you can post these on your site. I’ll try to get a close up of the mount. It’s not even scratched.” -John R., Worcester, MA

    This kit includes hardware and everything you need to add 5/8″ shackles (3/4″ pin) to the front of your Jeep. It’s about a 1-2 hour job, comes with all the (Grade 8) hardware you need and requires a 15mm socket with extension.  On a difficulty scale from 1-10, this is a 3.  Trimming the lower portion of the bumper is not required in order to use the snatch points, but you will have to notch the bumper out so that you can GET to the shackles.  Stock fog lights on the ’96+ models can be retained in the bumper if you desire.  Ships out the next business day if I have them in stock, which I normally do. Protect your radiator, free up some ground clearance, and add snatch points today, before you need them!!  Product varies visually slightly from photos due to update in strength.  It’s a little more low profile now as well.

    Safety First: You need to know how to extricate stuck vehicles before attempting it.  Warn did a great write-up on safe winching techniques HERE

    (special footnote: this product is designed to fit on ZJs with stock bumpers, but it can be modified to fit in conjunction with ARB front bumpers as well as other aftermarket bumpers.  Click HERE to find out more.)


    We are happy to announce that TRUCKS! has featured some of our Hard-KOR products on their recent project, including our Hard-KOR Radiator Support on their $5-Grand Grand Cherokee Build.  The episode should air on October 4th, 2008. HERE is a link to their build.


    Kevin – I bought your ZJ Radiator Support/Tow Point back in the beginning of August and hadn’t gotten to use it until this past weekend. I was impressed when I got it in the first place because of the beef construction. I knew it would definitely protect my radiator a lot better then the stock tin radiator support.  Well this past weekend I got in a rather deep water hole and had to be winched out. First my friends XJ tugged me a little bit, but I didn’t budge much so we hook up a 9000lbs winch attached to a friend’s TJ. That worked a bit better but still not much luck so we hooked up a snatch block and pulled around 12000lbs and we were able to winch my ZJ right out of the hole.  Your radiator support handled the pull like it was nothing. I’m very happy I bought it for my Jeep. Whenever anyone asks about front tow points for a ZJ I will be telling them about your great product. I’ve attached a picture of the radiator support in action. You’re more then welcome to use my pic and e-mail on the radiator support page.  If it wasn’t for that support I’m not sure how I would have got my ZJ out of that hole. ~Anthony H., Ontario, CAN~


    This item available in a thick powdercoated layer to protect from rust for only $8.97


    ZJ Radiator Support and Snatch Points

    TJ Wrangler and JK Wrangler Parts by JKS Manufacturing

    (If you have questions or a comment… post it below, and we’ll answer you ASAP!)



    Now carrying the entire line of JKS products for Wranglers.  If you don’t see a part, give us the number, and we’ll get you taken care of right away, with FREE** shipping!
    (Free Shipping: see restrictions below)

    Check out all of the parts listed below on our website at http://kevinsoffroad.com/cart


    JK ’07+ Wranglers Part Number Shipping ’97-’06 TJ Wranglers Part Number Shipping
    Quick Disconnects JKS-2030 JKS-2034 FREE! Quicker Disconnects JKS-2000 JKS-2001 JKS-2002 FREE!
    Adjustable Rear Trackbars JKS-159 FREE! Adjustable Rear Trackbars JKS-153 FREE!
    Adjustable Front Trackbars JKS-121 FREE! Adjustable Front Trackbars JKS-125 JKS-126 FREE!
    Adjustable BumpStops FREE! HD Tie Rod FREE!
    Rear Trackbar Brace JKS-169 FREE! HD Extended Brake Lines FREE!
    Adjustable Control Arms JKS-6150 JKS-6155 JKS-7150 JKS-7155 FREE! Adjustable Control Arms JKS-6100 JKS-7100 JKS-7101 FREE!
    Adjustable Coil Over Spacer (ACOS) JKS-2200 JKS-2550 FREE! Adjustable Coil Over Spacer (ACOS) JKS-2210 JKS-2570 FREE!
    ACOS Pro FREE! ACOS Pro FREE!
    FREE! Adjustable BumpStops FREE!
    Shock Conversions JKS-9602 FREE! Shock Conversions JKS-9602 FREE!
    Bar Pin Eliminators JKS-9603 JKS-9604 FREE! Bar Pin Eliminators JKS-9603 JKS-9604 FREE!

    **FREE SHIPPING offer is good for all $100+ JKS orders to a commercial address.  $2 residential fee applies for a non-commercial address.

    Jeep Cherokee XJ Front Bumpers and Rear Bumpers

    (If you have questions or a comment… post it below, and we’ll answer you ASAP!)


    Have you been looking for a unique set of Cherokee bumpers for your XJ Jeep Cherokee?  We have what might possibly be the best Jeep Cherokee bumpers on the market.  I don’t say that to brag…I have actually beat both the tube-type prerunner-style Jeep Cherokee bumpers AND the plate steel Stealth-style Jeep XJ bumper mercilessly on the rocks over the last seven years, and have had no issues whatsoever, other than scratched powdercoating.

    These XJ Jeep Cherokee bumpers are built to the Extreme: rock-bashable, high-clearance, and the fronts allows the mounting of a winch.  Protect the front and rear of your Jeep Cherokee from a disaster with a rock or tree today.  Our XJ Jeep Cherokee bumpers (front and rear) are CAD designed, bent out of SUPER-THICK 3/16″ plate steel, (which is more than 50% thicker than most of the other front and rear Cherokee bumpers on the market), built with some of the most expensive machinery available on the market.  Both the XJ front bumper and XJ rear bumper are sturdily mounted with the VERY BEST mounting system available in the aftermarket.  This CAD design “sandwiches” the weak XJ Cherokee uni-body frame rails on both top AND bottom…which is a FAR better and more solid design than how many other lesser-quality aftermarket Cherokee bumpers are made, mainly for the reason of reducing cost, I expect.

    Another important benefit of our XJ Cherokee Bumpers is the weight.  It’s pretty easy to slap a bunch of thick-walled steel together and call it a heavy-duty bumper…but it’s FAR more difficult to utilize structural-integral triangulation into the design so that you can reduce the weight of the material and STILL increase overall strength at the same time.  For that, you need CAD.  Only a CAD designer can build a winch-mount front bumper or a tire carrier style rear bumper for an XJ Jeep Cherokee which will withstand bashing the bumper into rocks, trees, and other trail obstacles, using a triangulated substructure, and keep overall weight at a minimum.  Our Jeep Cherokee Bumpers weigh 100lbs on average, and are VERY capable of firmly holding a 15k rated winch or a 150-pound tire and wheel combo hanging off the weak factory Cherokee uni-body frame rails.

    Shipping is via Truck Freight (too large to go via UPS), and ranges from $125 to $250 depending on how close to Phoenix, AZ you are.  We’d rather ship to your business, as there is a $70 residential surcharge if you have us ship it to a house rather than a zoned-business address.

    Light tabs can be drilled and mounted in the front section, but is discouraged due to the turbulence the lights will create, possibly causing your Jeep to overheat in some instances.

    A note from Kevin about front and rear bumpers and rear tire carrier design…

    When deciding on a front or rear aftermarket Cherokee bumper for your Jeep Cherokee XJ, make sure that you take into account some of the unforeseen issues.

    1) Does the tire carrier hold the tire in a way to reduce blind spots and maximize visibility out the rear?  Our carrier mounts on the driver’s side, in your natural blind-spot, so that you can see both over your right shoulder AND still see out the rear view mirror, which is mostly impossible with nearly all other Cherokee tire carrier bumpers on the market who put the tire carrier in the middle, or to the right, of the rear window, blocking your view partially or completely.

    2) How is the tire carrier mounted?  Can it withstand a washboard road with the weight of a 35″ tire on a steel wheel mounted on it?  That’s up to 150lbs in some cases, just rattling around back there on the bumper!  Our tire carrier uses a patented cam-latch, which utilizes an easy-to-open lever which puts constant tension on the latch and hasp assembly which completely eliminates rattles from your carrier.  And, you can actually lift the entire rear end of the Jeep off the ground with a forklift from OUR tire carrier…how’s that for strong?

    3) What sort of hinge is included?  Our XJ Cherokee rear bumper uses twin 3/4″ Heim joints, which not only has over 12,000 lbs. of radial load capability EACH (there are two…that’s 24,000 lbs. total), but are also easily replaceable as they wear over time.  Because of the design, you are also able to fine-tune the height of the carrier up and down so that it enters the latch properly (just like a factory car door) by threading the Heim joints inward or outward.  Utilizing this design also makes it possible to completely remove the carrier from your bumper very easily if you wanted to.

    4) Our XJ Cherokee bumpers are built with 1/4″ ultra-thick steel plate in the center sections (between the frame mounts for added rigidity) and 3/16″ thick steel plate everywhere else, which is more than 50% thicker than even the most well-known brands of Cherokee bumpers.  Have you ever seen a (well-known brand) front Jeep winch bumper BEND IN THE CENTER during a heavy winch pull?  I have, with my own eyes, and that’s why we use 1/4″ and 3/16″ steel with fortified 3/8″ thick CAD-designed frame rail mounts!  This bumper ain’t going ANYWHERE once you mount it up, even when you’re using your winch.

    5) Our XJ Cherokee bumpers allow for the best approach angle and departure angle currently available in ANY aftermarket Cherokee bumper manufacturer, ’cause that’s how we roll, playa.  Check out the clearance!

    6) Our winch mounting plate is inserted inside the front bumper, all the way down, so as to not give you overheating problems like some of the other aftermarket bumpers have been known to cause.  Can you imagine spending the better part of a thousand bucks on a bumper, and then find out that it causes your Jeep to overheat?  Talk about an unpleasant wake-up call?  We’ve designed these Cherokee bumpers to stay below the factory air intake area for the radiator, so as not to block the flow of air, and furthermore, allowed the bottom of the bumper to allow the flow of air around it as well.

    D-ring tabs for the stealth XJ bumper are a $45.97 upgrade, and I HIGHLY recommend them.

    Also available are our Pre-Runner Style bumpers, which are nearly as beefy, but are a tad lighter.  Click on the images below for a larger photo.

    S/H costs: By Truck Freight only.  A business with a loading dock is $60~$80 cheaper than a residence.

    THINK IN BULK: Buying two bumpers at once reduces your shipping cost by around 60%.  Two bumpers on a pallet only costs about 20% more than a single bumper on a pallet to the same zip code!

    ALL BUMPERS COME NON-POWDERCOATED.

    Krylon spray paint works well, and so does POR-15.  Even if you decide you want professional painting or powdercoating, you can probably have your Cherokee bumpers powdercoated AFTER they arrive locally for less than I can charge you to do them.  Do some price comparisons before ordering.  Just trying to save you some money.

    -Kevin-

    For Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) about specific details on our bumpers, click HERE

    (all bumpers fit 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997,1998, 1999, 2000, and 2001 Jeep XJ Cherokees )

    HARD-KOR Stealth Front Cherokee Bumper for all XJ model Jeep Cherokees

    HARD-KOR Stealth Rear Cherokee Bumper for all XJ model Jeep Cherokees

    Tube-Style Front PreRunner Cherokee Bumper for all XJ model Jeep Cherokees

    Tube-Style Rear PreRunner Cherokee Bumper for all XJ model Jeep Cherokees

    JK Wrangler Installation Instruction Guides

    (If you have questions or a comment… post it below, and we’ll answer you ASAP!)

    JK-Track-Bar-Front-JKS-121

    JK-Track-Bar-Rear-159

    JK Steering Stabilizer Relocation Bracket ( OGS-162 )

    KOR-9906 Track Bar Sleeve and Bolt Kit Install Guide

    TJ Wrangler Installation Instruction Guides

    (If you have questions or a comment… post it below, and we’ll answer you ASAP!)

    TJ ACOS Spacers Install Guide

    TJ Wrangler Front Track Bar Install Guide

    TJ-Rear-Track-Bar-Install Guide (JKS-151b)

    TJ Adjustable-Control-Arms-Lower-Front (JKS-6100)

    KOR-9906 Track Bar Sleeve and Bolt Kit Install Guide

    ZJ Grand Cherokee Installation Instruction Guides

    (If you have questions or a comment… post it below, and we’ll answer you ASAP!)

    ZJ Stealth Front Bumper Install Instructions

    ZJ STEALTH REAR BUMPER INSTALL 1

    ZJ STEALTH REAR BUMPER INSTALL 2

    ZJ STEALTH REAR BUMPER INSTALL 3

    ZJ STEALTH REAR BUMPER INSTALL 4

    ZJ STEALTH REAR BUMPER INSTALL 5

    ZJ STEALTH REAR BUMPER INSTALL 6

    ZJ PRERUNNER REAR BUMPER INSTALL 1

    ZJ PRERUNNER REAR BUMPER INSTALL 2

    ZJ PRERUNNER FRONT BUMPER INSTALL 1

    ZJ PRERUNNER FRONT BUMPER INSTALL 2

    ZJ PRERUNNER FRONT BUMPER INSTALL 3

    ZJ U-Turn-Steering Installation Instructions

    ZJ Steering Stabilizer

    ZJ-Radiator-Support-Tow-Points

    ZJ-Rocker-Panel-Protection

    ZJ Track-Bar-Conversion

    ZJ Roof Rack

    ZJ Light-Bar-Installation-Guide

    ZJ Tire Carrier

    ZJ Front ACOS Spacers JKS-2200

    ZJ Rear ACOS Spacers KOR-2201

    ZJ Front Track Bar Install Guide

    ZJ Adjustable-Control-Arms-Lower-Front

    ZJ OTHER INSTALL INSTRUCTION GUIDES

    XJ Cherokee Installation Instruction Guides

    (If you have questions or a comment… post it below, and we’ll answer you ASAP!)


    XJ Cherokee Stealth Rear Bumper Install Guide

    XJ Steering Box Brace Install Instructions

    XJ U-Turn-Steering Installation Instructions

    XJ-Track-Bar-Conversion

    XJ Roof-Rack

    XJ Light Bars

    XJ Tire-Carrier

    XJ Front Track Bar Install Guide

    XJ Adjustable-Control-Arms-Lower-Front

    XJ ACOS Spacers JKS-2200

    XJ-Rocker-Panel-Protection

    Other XJ Install Instructions

    XJ Steering Stabilizer Install Guide

    WJ Grand Cherokee Installation Instruction Guides

    (If you have questions or a comment… post it below, and we’ll answer you ASAP!)

    WJ Grand Cherokee Front Stealth Bumper Install Instructions

    WJ Grand Cherokee Rear Stealth Bumper Install Instructions

    WJ Grand Cherokee A-Arm Spacer Install Guide

    WJ-Roof-Rack

    WJ Tire Carrier Install Instructions

    WJ-Front-Track-Bar-Install Guide

    WJ Adjustable-Control-Arms-Lower-Front

    WJ-Tie-Rod-Drag-Link

    WJ-Primary-Steering-Stabilizer

    WJ-Secondary-Steering-Stabilizer

    WJ-Rocker-Panel-Protection

    WJ-Tow-Hook-Recovery-Kit-Install-Guide

    Hard-KOR WJ Grand Cherokee Skid Plate installation guide (Clayton Long Arm kit ONLY)

    Other WJ Install Instructions

    KOR-9906 Track Bar Sleeve and Bolt Kit Install Guide

    JKS Adjustable Control Arms for JK Wrangler, TJ Wrangler, XJ Cherokee, ZJ Grand Cherokee, & WJ Grand Cherokee

    JKS’s lower control arms are the heaviest duty units on the market, bar none. Uni-body Jeeps tend to transfer more road noise and suspension vibrations than do Jeeps with solid frames, so JKS uses the factory OEM rubber bushing at both ends of our control arms to reduce those annoying noises and vibrations. These control arms twist or rotate while driving allowing the axle to flex easily over obstacles offroad. With over 3 inches of adjustment, adjusting the length is as simple as removing one end and rotating the body or shaft to the desired length.

    Kevin, Thank-you so much for the incredibly fast service! I received the part yesterday and it is getting installed today. Thanks again for your amazing service!  Sincerely, Michael P., Tucson, AZ

    Thread strength can be thought of like axle spline strength, the more the axle splines there are, the stronger the axle is. JKS machines eighteen threads per inch on their lower control arms, not “acme” threads (typically five threads per inch) that tend to be weak and have very little fine-tuning ability that some of the other guys use.  The adjusting shaft rides on a full brass bushing and is then sealed to keep out dirt. Each unit is then filled with grease to help keep out all moisture and maintain the threads.  By the way, I’m not the only guy impressed with the JKS arms…check out THIS ARTICLE from Tony Curless from 4wd and SUV magazine, who is one of the original ZJ modifiers, from even before my day, lol.  His articles on “The Rise and Fall of Project ZJ” were one of the things that got me into modifying *MY* ZJ, and the rest is history…but I digress.

    Hi Kevin , just wanted to thank you for all your help. I appreciate The quick response to my e-mail. Your customer service is second to none. I just ordered upper adjustable control arms from your site tonight to replace the stock ones. Hopefully that will cure the vibration problem.  Jeremy D., Vancouver, BC

    Black powder coating and zinc plating are standard.

    Thank you SO MUCH for the quick response!!  We received the arms Monday and my death wobble appears to be gone!  You guys are awesome!!!! – Katey Brown, Pittsburgh, PA

    JKS’s upper control arms are built to the same exact standards as their lower control arms. Again, with over 3 inches of adjustment in pinion angle, these control arms can be fine tuned quickly and easily. Factory OEM style rubber bushings are used at each end to eliminate as much vibration and noise as a stock control arm would…none of this urethane garbage that forces you to feel every bump.

    The front upper control arms utilize an exclusive modular design only available from JKS. The design is far superior in strength than anything else on the market, and can be completely disassembled and rebuilt with simple hand tools if required.

    Simply the best control arms available…

    Shipping FREE* on all $200+ JKS orders.

    Promo…Promo…Promo…Promo…Promo…Promo…Promo…Promo…

    Special Promo through the end of the Month

    Matched front set lowers and uppers (ZJ/WJ/XJ/TJ 0″-6″ lift) JKS-6100/7100
    Matched rear set lowers and uppers (ZJ/TJ 0″-6″ lift) JKS-6100/7101
    Matched front & rear set lowers and uppers (ZJ/TJ 0″-6″ lift) JKS-6100×2/7100/7101
    Matched JKS front upper/lower set and extended longer rear (WJ) JKS-6100/6125/7100
    Rear A-Arm spacer (required for WJs with 3.0″+ lift) KOR-9302

    JKS Adjustable Control Arms Separately

    Applications

    Model Number

    All TJ/XJ/ZJ Front or Rear Lowers (WJ Front Lowers only)

    JKS-6100

    All WJ Rear Lower Arms

    JKS-6125

    All TJ, XJ, ZJ, WJ Upper Fronts

    JKS-7100

    FREE SHIPPING – JKS Adjustable Control Arms: Front Lowers (JK 0″-6″ lift ONLY)

    JKS-6150

    *Free shipping to the 48 states

    ZJ Steering Box Braces

    Please go HERE for the updated version of this page:

    http://kevinsoffroad.com/jeep/jeep-grand-cherokee-zj/zj-steering-gearbox-brace/














    How long has it been since you’ve checked your three steering gear bolts?  Have you noticed looseness in your steering? Do they come loose often? If so, it’s probably because you’ve added quite a bit of force to the system by adding taller and wider tires.  Let me impress upon you how important it is to KNOW that they’re they tight!  See, every action has an equal and opposite reaction.  You learned that in High School Physics, right?  Anyway, when you turn the steering wheel to the right, the pitman arm forces the tie-rod to the right, pushing the front of the wheel rightward so you can turn the Jeep.  It also pushes the driver’s side frame rail leftward at the same time which is where the steering box is mounted.  If you had a skinny little 28″ tire on there, the steering gear has no problem overcoming the friction of the tire’s contact patch on the pavement because it’s only like 16 square inches of area at correct inflation.  By way of comparison, a 31″ tire is nearly THREE TIMES that amount of area at the correct inflation.  (when volume of tire increases, less pressure is needed *OR WANTED*, so the tire lays on the pavement more.  Proper inflation for a 31″ tire is probably around 24psi in the front and less on the rear on most ZJs.  Use the chalk-method to insure that your tires are properly inflated and not over-inflated).  Have any idea what a 35″ tire’s contact patch looks like?  It’s probably three times a 31″ tire!

    Everything showed up, and we were able to install the parts with no problems!  Both items, the steering box stabilizer and the electronic ignition kit made noticeable “seat of the pants” improvements!  Steering and alignment have never been better, and no more knocking or pinging when climbing under heavy throttle!  I highly recommend both of these items, and look forward to ordering from you again in the future!  You guys ROCK! – John K. from Frisco, Texas

    Secondly, have you noticed how many bolts are holding the steering box to the frame?  Exactly 3.  And, they are all at the top, not down at the bottom where you need them to brace the forces of the larger contact patch, not to mention pushing up against a rock or tree when you are offroad.  It’s essentially a hydraulic-assisted lever with a bracket on only one end to brace it.  How long until it fails?  How tight are your bolts?  Once they are loose, the box will work back and forth under the Jeep until it either shears off one of the three bolts or rips off one of the ears on the box (or both, like what happened to me on Pritchett Canyon in Moab).

    How strong is is?  Well, strong enough to hold my steering box in position tightly while I broke the steering gear sector shaft in two.  The photo below to the upper right is of my drag link dangling after the pitman arm sheared off the steering box sector shaft.  You can still see the nut under the pitman arm…it sheared right above the pitman arm.  When I went to remove the bolts on the steering gear box that go through the frame, I expected to find them loose again, like they were before I installed this brace in 2005.  Huh uh…those babies were TIGHT.  That box was not moving at ALL.  The 1-1/4″ thick, hardened sector shaft sheared from the stress of 37″ tires and a front locker, but the box was held straight and true with the box brace in position.  If that’s not a true test of how much force the steering box brace takes off of the box’s frame mounts, I’m not sure what is.

    So, you can see why it’s important to have a steering brace for your steering box.  Without further adieu, allow me to introduce our steering box brace for the ZJ, which bolts in on both sides of the front frame rail to the factory skid plate and sway bar mounting holes and clamps solidly to the steering box, keeping it from moving around on the lower end where there is no support.  It’ll increase your steering response, will keep you from breaking tabs off of the steering gear like I did, and will keep the factory gear bolts tighter on the frame.  Comes powdercoated to resist the elements and includes all the hardware you need to bolt it right in.  No cutting, welding, modifying necessary.  You can even re-use the worthless front factory skid if you elect to do so, but you may need to modify the rear tabs ever so slightly so that they don’t come inboard as far.  No biggie.  It’ll be obvious what to do when you get it under there.  Personally, there is nothing that the front skid really protects, once you’re lifted, so you may just ditch it and be done with it.  That’s what I did.

    NOTE: If you still have the stock front anti-sway bar, you’ll need to modify both the anti-sway bar bushing clamp and the tip of the steering box brace mounting brackets where they bolt to the frame as they hit each other when you try to bolt them together.  Alternately, you can purchase Energy Suspension grease-able anti-sway bar bushing kits below which has more clearance than the stock bushing clams do to get around this problem.




    ANOTHER NOTE: A select few have had fitment issues with respect to width of their frame rails.  If your Grand has been in a front end collision and you’d prefer to *NOT* modify the frame mounting holes by “ovaling” them a bit, please send the brace back BEFORE you install it and scratch the powdercoating, and I’ll give you a full refund in accordance with our Return Policy.

    Install Instructions

    Unbolt the two forward-most bolts on the front anti-sway bar and leave the rear two in.  You may also need to remove the useless Mopar factory front skid plate if you have the misfortune of having one.  Simply place the brace in position by placing it under the lower radiator hose with the half-collar cradling the steering gear box.  Thread the factory anti-sway bar bolts through the frame rail mounting tabs and then through the front holes of the anti-sway bar clamps, sandwiching the front anti-sway bar clamp tabs between the steering box brackets and the frame.  Now, put the other half of the steering gear clamp around the steering gear and tighten the two bolts down with the nuts.  Snug everything up, and you’re done.  You MAY elect to loosen the three steering gear mounting bolts in your fender-well area (forward of the track bar bracket) to bump the steering gear into position if the box has ever been replaced.  Enjoy the tighter steering response and the add’l bracing so that the box won’t pull off the frame rail. -Kevin-


    ZJ Extreme Duty Steering Box Brace

    Applications Retail Price Intro Price
    Add Grease-able sway bar bushings TOGETHER WITH your SBB order $25.00 Check Cart To See Pricing
    Add Grease-able sway bar bushings SEPARATE from a SBB order $25.00 Check Cart To See Pricing
    ’93>’98 ZJ V8 w/ powdercoat $175.97 Check Cart To See Pricing
    ’93>’98 ZJ V8 w/o powdercoat $165.97 Check Cart To See Pricing
    ’93>’98 ZJ 4.0L 6cyl. w/ powdercoat $175.97 Check Cart To See Pricing
    ’93>’98 ZJ 4.0L 6cyl. w/o powdercoat $165.97 Check Cart To See Pricing

    JKS Adjustable Coil Spring Spacers (ACOS) for TJ & JK Wrangler, Cherokee and ZJ & WJ Grand Cherokee

    If you’ve ever wished that you could tailor your ride-height perfectly on your Cherokee, Wrangler, or Grand Cherokee, ACOS spacers are your solution.  Have a spring sagging that you now have to replace?  Would you like to have different ride-heights available to you during different times of the year?  You are really going to love me if that’s the case, ’cause boy, do I have a solution for YOU!!!  “ACOS™”, or Adjustable Coil Over Spacers by JKS Manufacturing.  A very nicely built unit that will eliminate the problems associated with trying to make your Jeep level.  Add a stereo to the back and weighing it down?  Add or remove a heavy front bumper?  No trouble!  Within a few moments you can have your Jeep back to level without removing springs and using compressors.  Check it out:

    Original Adjustable Coil Spacers


    ACOS Pro with Jounce bumper built in




    • USEFUL when making future plans for heavy bumpers and/or winches (typically adding 100lb+)

    • Can be installed with just a few tools: installation is no more difficult than a Budget Boost

    • Available for the front and rear springs on ZJs and TJs, and the front coils of XJ.

    • Adjustable in just minutes from 1.25″ to 3.00” (recommended maximum) of lift.

    • Compensate for sagging coil springs, which will invariably sag over time

    • Adjust to compensate for uneven spring heights from side to side.

    • Ultimate add-on lift for those who don’t want to swap out springs.

    • Extremely simple to install and looks SLICK as hell!

    Install instructions for spring spacer lifts HERE

    Install instructions for ACOS spacers HERE

    NOTE: At this time we don’t have any way to modify these spacers to work on the WJ, but we are working toward a solution.  We will post info as soon as we know how we are going to pull it off.

    *Free shipping to the 48 states

    Adjustable Coil Spring Spacers for TJ Wrangler, JK Wrangler,

    ZJ Grand Cherokee, and XJ Cherokees

    IMPORTANT NOTE: ADDING LIFT TO YOUR JEEP REQUIRES ADJUSTMENT TO ADDITIONAL COMPONENTS TO MAKE IT SAFE. CONSULT YOUR INSTALLER FOR YOUR SPECIFIC NEEDS.

    **ZJ Rear ACOS Installers: We have had an issue with the rear UpCountry springs being wrapped slightly too tight to go over the ACOS threaded post.  You can easily clearance the spring with a Dremel tool, or just simply removing a small portion of the “pig-tail” from the top of the spring with a right-angle grinder or saw.  This ONLY affects the rear UpCountry springs, so far as we can tell. -Kevin-

    JKS Upper Shock Loop Conversion

    A common problem with any lifted Cherokee, Wrangler, or Grand Cherokee is that there are limited shock options due to the O.E.M. upper-bayonet-style shock configuration.

    Many shock manufacturers simply do not build a stud-style shock in long enough lengths to accommodate high travel after-market lift kits; however, they do in the more popular EB1 loop-mount style.  These “Shock Conversions” are a simple bolt on item that will allow you to use any EB1 shock.  They reduce the static ride height of the shock by 1.10 inches………which translates into 1.10 inches more droop for your suspension.  Make sure to pick up a 1 1/4″ socket to aid in mounting.


    Shipping FREE* on all $200+ JKS orders.

    *Free shipping to the 48 states


    JKS Upper Front Shock Loop Conversions

    Applications  
    ’84 – ’01 XJ & ’87 – ’95 YJ Click HERE: JKS-9603
    ’97>’06 TJ, ’93>’98 ZJ, ’99>’04 WJ, ’07+ JK Click HERE: JKS-9604

    KOR Heavy Duty Rock Sliders

    (the entire weight of the Grand Cherokee above is being supported by it’s Rock Sliders.  Click on the pic for a larger size)

    Available for all years of Cherokees and Grand Cherokees.  Kevin’s Rock Sliders® are “Rubicon Tested, Moab Approved”™.  I’ve been selling these since 1999 now, and have saved my customers potentially hundreds of thousands of dollars in damage on their rigs.  Hit the trails with confidence before a rock you thought you’d clear, but didn’t, ruins your entire trip.

    Kevin & Co.,  Now what am I going to do?  I got the Sliders today and put them on. I had no trouble installing them – other than the standard “whish I had a hand and arm in the middle of my chest” kind of issues.  The Sliders arrived in perfect shape, all of the hardware was in the package, and they fit up like they were – heh – made for my Jeep!!!  I don’t care that they took a couple of extra days to arrive. Based on my satisfaction with the roof rack, I had reason to believe the Sliders would be just as great.  This note is to let you know that the Sliders are, in fact, great!  Smashing them up will be a pleasure! 😉  Probably going to be buying again soon, Michael Combest, Baldwin City, Ks.


    Now available, JKS SuperNerf bars as well

    Click on your rig below.

    Each kit includes mounting hardware and a sticker.  On a difficulty scale from 1-10, installing these is around 5-6.  Add some peace of mind today.

    Hard-KOR and OME Steering Stabilizers

    Due to the seemingly ever-increasing cost of the OME products, I spent some time sourcing a private-label steering stabilizer that we’ve found works just as well as the OME stabilizer does.  We tried many different manufacturer’s stabilizers out on our various WJ, ZJ, XJ, TJ and JK Jeeps, including all of the big names of aftermarket steering stabilizers (and even some of the small names) and we found that there was only one company who could make a steering stabilizer that equaled the OME in quality and in dampening, so we struck a deal with them, buying them in bulk to drive down YOUR price.  Our new Hard-KOR stabilizer is equal in every way to the OME stabilizer, and we are VERY happy to not only offer you a product that’s as high a quality, but also, costs you less.  And, possibly best of all, it comes in white, lol.  It’s a win-win situation for you!!





    Anyway, I have added in the Hard-KOR Steering Stabilizer to our pricing below, and know that you’re going to love the way it feels.  If not, no risk…just send it on back to me and I’ll give you a full refund less shipping.  That’s how strongly I feel about it.   -Kevin-

    Like all of the products you’ll find on our website, we’ve tested and replaced part after part until I found the most desirable one for a particular application on the market to sell here on my website.  The KOR and OME steering stabilizers are hands-down the clear and distinct winner when it comes to a controlled ride and improved resistance to Death Wobble on Wrangler TJ / LJ / JK, XJ Cherokees, and WJ / ZJ Grand Cherokees.






    Designed to reduce the effect of wheel “flutter” and improve the feel, handling and control of the vehicle, our steering stabilizers will also reduce the aggressive rotation of the steering wheel over rough roads without affecting steering wheel return. Steering stabilizers are usually fitted forward of the front differential making them prone to rocks and other damage. Old Man Emu steering stabilizers feature a twin tube design and heavy gauge steel stone guard to help resist damage.  A can of spray paint will allow you to paint it to match the scheme on your Jeep if you aren’t a fan of “safety yellow”, lol.  If you have a WJ, make sure to purchase the add’l “WJ HARDWARE KIT**”.

     

    Kevin, this is the second time I have ordered my items from you. Your team Rocks!!! Thank you for your valued service and your hard work. I am as always a 100% satisfied customer. -Brian Schroeter-

    =========================

    I just wanted to drop a line and say thanks again, I am a Roofing Contractor and I firmly believe that top notch customer service is key to success. Kevin’s Off-Road has that top notch score. I have only ordered a steering stabilizer and I was treated like a loyal customer, and I will always be a loyal customer. Thanks again. ~Travis Grim~


     

    Shown mounted on the drag link like the ZJ/XJ/TJ






    Shown mounted on the tie rod like a WJ

     

    If you have a WJ with Death Wobble problems, check out our new secondary steering stabilizer kit  HERE

     

    Hard-KOR Features:





    Twin-tube linear dampening

    Large-body stabilizer (2-1/2″) to reduce fade and cool oil charge more efficiently

    9/16″ thick hardened shaft

    Dual-oil Seal – preventing unnecessary oil loss

    Valved appropriately for large tires and offset wheels

    OME Features:





    Steel Stone Guard – protects the piston rod against stone damage

    9 stage Coil Spring Valving for optimum performance

    15mm Piston Rod – stronger than the original

    35mm Piston & Bore – increased oil volume

    Multi Lip Seal – prevents unnecessary oil loss

    Install instructions here: ZJ or WJ

    NOTE: OME raised prices April 2007, Oct 2007, and May 2008

     

    Hard-KOR Steering Stabilizer

    Applications Retail Price Kevin’s Price
    All Dana 30 front Wrangler $89.97 Click To Go To Shopping Cart
    All Dana 30 front Cherokee $89.97 Click To Go To Shopping Cart
    All Dana 30 front ZJ G. Cherokee $89.97 Click To Go To Shopping Cart
    All Dana 30 front WJ G. Cherokee $89.97 Click To Go To Shopping Cart
    WJ HARDWARE KIT** $25 Click To Go To Shopping Cart

    OME Steering Stabilizer

    Applications Retail Price Kevin’s Price
    All Dana 30 front Wrangler $105.97 Click To Go To Shopping Cart
    All Dana 30 front Cherokee $105.97 Click To Go To Shopping Cart
    All Dana 30 front ZJ G. Cherokee $105.97 Click To Go To Shopping Cart
    All Dana 30 front WJ G. Cherokee $105.97 Click To Go To Shopping Cart
    WJ HARDWARE KIT** $25 Click To Go To Shopping Cart

    **The ’99+ Grand Cherokee “WJ HARDWARE KIT” includes the correct fitting hardware so that you don’t have to extract and reuse the factory one, and makes the installation on the WJ much tighter than if you had reused the factory style.  Click HERE for installation instructions for the WJ and HERE for the ZJ.

    ZJ Steering Gearbox Brace

    How long has it been since you’ve checked your three steering gear bolts?  Have you noticed looseness in your steering? Do they come loose often? If so, it’s probably because you’ve added quite a bit of force to the system by adding taller and wider tires.

    Let me impress upon you how important it is to KNOW that they’re they tight!  See, every action has an equal and opposite reaction.  You learned that in High School Physics, right?

    Anyway, when you turn the steering wheel to the right, the pitman arm forces the tie-rod to the right, pushing the front of the wheel rightward so you can turn the Jeep.  It also pushes the driver’s side frame rail leftward at the same time which is where the steering box is mounted.

    If you had a skinny little 28″ tire on there, the steering gear has no problem overcoming the friction of the tire’s contact patch on the pavement because it’s only like 16 square inches of area at correct inflation.

    By way of comparison, a 31″ tire is nearly THREE TIMES that amount of area at the correct inflation.  (when volume of tire increases, less pressure is needed *OR WANTED*, so the tire lays on the pavement more.  Proper inflation for a 31″ tire is probably around 24psi in the front and less on the rear on most ZJs.

    Use the chalk-method to insure that your tires are properly inflated and not over-inflated).  Have any idea what a 35″ tire’s contact patch looks like?  It’s probably three times a 31″ tire!

    Everything showed up, and we were able to install the parts with no problems!  Both items, the steering box stabilizer and the electronic ignition kit made noticeable “seat of the pants” improvements!  Steering and alignment have never been better, and no more knocking or pinging when climbing under heavy throttle!  I highly recommend both of these items, and look forward to ordering from you again in the future!  You guys ROCK! – John K. from Frisco, Texas

    Secondly, have you noticed how many bolts are holding the steering box to the frame?  Exactly 3.  And, they are all at the top, not down at the bottom where you need them to brace the forces of the larger contact patch, not to mention pushing up against a rock or tree when you are offroad.  It’s essentially a hydraulic-assisted lever with a bracket on only one end to brace it.  How long until it fails?  How tight are your bolts?  Once they are loose, the box will work back and forth under the Jeep until it either shears off one of the three bolts or rips off one of the ears on the box (or both, like what happened to me on Pritchett Canyon in Moab).

    How strong is is?  Well, strong enough to hold my steering box in position tightly while I broke the steering gear sector shaft in two.  The photo below to the upper right is of my drag link dangling after the pitman arm sheared off the steering box sector shaft.  You can still see the nut under the pitman arm…it sheared right above the pitman arm.  When I went to remove the bolts on the steering gear box that go through the frame, I expected to find them loose again, like they were before I installed this brace in 2005.  Huh uh…those babies were TIGHT.  That box was not moving at ALL.  The 1-1/4″ thick, hardened sector shaft sheared from the stress of 37″ tires and a front locker, but the box was held straight and true with the box brace in position.  If that’s not a true test of how much force the steering box brace takes off of the box’s frame mounts, I’m not sure what is.


    So, you can see why it’s important to have a steering brace for your steering box.  Without further adieu, allow me to introduce our steering box brace for the ZJ, which bolts in on both sides of the front frame rail to the factory skid plate and sway bar mounting holes and clamps solidly to the steering box, keeping it from moving around on the lower end where there is no support.  It’ll increase your steering response, will keep you from breaking tabs off of the steering gear like I did, and will keep the factory gear bolts tighter on the frame.  Comes powdercoated to resist the elements and includes all the hardware you need to bolt it right in.  No cutting, welding, modifying necessary.  You can even re-use the worthless front factory skid if you elect to do so, but you may need to modify the rear tabs ever so slightly so that they don’t come inboard as far.  No biggie.  It’ll be obvious what to do when you get it under there.

    Personally, there is nothing that the front skid really protects, once you’re lifted, so you may just ditch it and be done with it.  That’s what I did.

    NOTE: If you still have the stock front anti-sway bar, you’ll need to modify both the anti-sway bar bushing clamp and the tip of the steering box brace mounting brackets where they bolt to the frame as they hit each other when you try to bolt them together.  Alternately, you can purchase Energy Suspension grease-able anti-sway bar bushing kits below which has more clearance than the stock bushing clams do to get around this problem.



    ANOTHER NOTE: A select few have had fitment issues with respect to width of their frame rails.  If your Grand has been in a front end collision and you’d prefer to *NOT* modify the frame mounting holes by “ovaling” them a bit, please send the brace back BEFORE you install it and scratch the powdercoating, and I’ll give you a full refund in accordance with our Return Policy.


    Unbolt the two forward-most bolts on the front anti-sway bar and leave the rear two in.  You may also need to remove the useless Mopar factory front skid plate if you have the misfortune of having one.  Simply place the brace in position by placing it under the lower radiator hose with the half-collar cradling the steering gear box.  Thread the factory anti-sway bar bolts through the frame rail mounting tabs and then through the front holes of the anti-sway bar clamps, sandwiching the front anti-sway bar clamp tabs between the steering box brackets and the frame.  Now, put the other half of the steering gear clamp around the steering gear and tighten the two bolts down with the nuts.  Snug everything up, and you’re done.  You MAY elect to loosen the three steering gear mounting bolts in your fender-well area (forward of the track bar bracket) to bump the steering gear into position if the box has ever been replaced.  Enjoy the tighter steering response and the add’l bracing so that the box won’t pull off the frame rail. -Kevin-


    ZJ Extreme Duty Steering Box Brace

    Applications Retail Price Intro Price
    Add Grease-able sway bar bushings TOGETHER WITH your SBB order $25.00 Check Cart To See Pricing
    Add Grease-able sway bar bushings SEPARATE from a SBB order $25.00 Check Cart To See Pricing
    ’93>’98 ZJ V8 w/ powdercoat $175.97 Check Cart To See Pricing
    ’93>’98 ZJ 4.0L 6cyl. w/ powdercoat $175.97 Check Cart To See Pricing

    WJ Grand Cherokee Tie Rod and Drag Link Assembly

    How many times have you bent your WJ’s stock tie rod or drag link?  Does it look more like the horizon of the Moon than the plains of Kansas?  Well, we’ve come up with yet another creative solution for you, with parts you simply can’t find anywhere else.

    How does a 1.25″ chrome-alloy steel DOM tube with 3/8″ sidewall sound to you?  You know how thick a pencil is, right?  It’s about 50% thicker wall than a pencil…!!  I’ll have some photos up soon, but this thing is EXTREMELY resilient to bending!!

    Already pre-tapped to work with your WJ’s factory 24mm (0.945″) LH/RH tie rod ends, which are PLENTY beefy, even for hardcore rock crawling, and includes powdercoating and jamb nuts.  A completely bolt-in deal for WJ owners…just re-use your stock WJ tie rod ends and use the jamb nuts that comes in the package…simple, easy, done deal, and LOT thicker than the stock crap.

    I love it! You did a great job !! anyway I drove to Jemez Springs, New Mexico last week and this is a pic. You can add it to your collection if you wish…
    – Danny Trujillo


    In each photo, compare the thickness of the factory WJ tie rod segment on the left and the Hard-KOR WJ tie rod segment on the right.



    Hard-KOR WJ Tie Rod and Drag Links

    WJ Custom Steering Stabilizer Setup

    Have you done everything you can to get rid of the dreaded Death Wobble, and are even more frustrated now than you were previously? 

    We’ve done a lot of Death Wobble cures here at the shop, and have found that for some reason, the WJs seem to have a higher propensity for Death Wobble than the XJs and ZJs do.  We think this is because the steering stabilizer is mounted between the tie-rod and the axle on the WJ Grand Cherokee, rather than between the drag link and the axle like on the XJ/ZJ/TJ Jeeps.  Anyway, below is the kit to add a second steering stabilizer between the drag link and the track bar, which has cured HUNDREDS of WJ Grand Cherokee cases of “uncurable” Death Wobble in the last 6 years that we’ve designed and begun selling it.  IT CAN ALSO BE USED TO RELOCATE YOUR PRIMARY STEERING STABILIZER LOCATION UPWARD IF YOU DON’T HAVE DEATH WOBBLE, BUT ARE TIRED OF IT GETTING SMASHED ON THE ROCKS. 

    There are two kits: the 1.00″ OD Anti- Death Wobble kit for FACTORY-size trackbars, and the Anti- Death Wobble kit for the 1.25″ OD Heavy Duty track bar, similar in size to the adjustable JKS model sold HERE

    Ideally you’d upgrade the factory WJ trackbar at the same time to the extra-beefy JKS model if you have not already done so, because it REALLY helps keep the axle firmly planted, rather than oscillating back and forth under your Grand Cherokee when you hit a bump and the entire front end starts shaking like crazy. 

    You can use this Anti- Death Wobble kit with either the factory drag link or the Hard-KOR upgraded drag link we sell HERE.  If you have the cash, there is no substitute for the combination package of the Anti- Death Wobble kit (secondary stabilizer), a new primary steering stabilizer, a new JKS track bar with Hard-KOR bushings and a new Hard-KOR Tie-rod and Drag-link. 



    Kevin, I have a 99 WJ with a Tera Flex 4-inch lift on it.  I have had death wobble for several months now that I could not fix.  I replaced tie rods, tires, track bar, had the caster angle changed, replaced the steering stabilizer, and more.  Nothing was working. I had already replaced the original stabilizer so I went ahead and left that one on.  I figured two would be better.  I purchased a Steering Stabilizer relocation kit and dampener from you, and the problem is fixed.  I tried everything else first when I should have just tried this.  Maybe if someone else reads what I went through, they wont have to go through it as well. You have a new customer for life. Thanks a bunch.
    A satisfied customer, Scott M., Westminster, CO
    I just installed the Dual SS and thought id let ya know that it did its job! awesome product will be doing business again! Blake, Deland, FL

    I just wanted to let you guys know the JKS Track Bar and your WJ dual stabilizer kit worked better than I could have dreamed!  Before when I hit bumps the steering would shudder and, if above 40 m.p.h., there was a high chance of severe death wobble. This is great!  I have been living with the problem since I bought my WJ 2 years ago. 30k miles of agony later I saw this kit.  God Bless You Kevin’s!  My jeep drives like it always should have.   Thanks again, Tom C., Port Angeles, WA

    The kit comes with the following:

    • Your choice of a new Hard-KOR or Old Man Emu steering stabilizer
    • Two Heavy Duty clamps (size varies per track bar OD)
    • Mounting hardware for both ends of the stabilizer
    Due to the seemingly ever-increasing cost of the OME products, I spent some time sourcing a private-label steering stabilizer that we’ve found works every bit as well as the OME stabilizer does, and better.  We tried many different manufacturer’s stabilizers out on our Jeeps, including all of the big names and some of the small names, and we found that there was only one manufacturer who could make a steering stabilizer that equalled the OME in quality and in dampening, and did NOT offer a steel “rock guard” (which we’ve found to get smashed on rocks and bent so badly that steering is majorly hampered), so we struck a deal with them, buying them in bulk to drive down your price.  Our new Hard-KOR stabilizer is equal OR BETTER in every way to the OME stabilizer, and we are VERY happy to not only offer you a product that’s as high a quality, but also, costs you less.  And, possibly best of all, it comes in white, lol.  It’s a win-win situation for you!!

    Anyway, I have added in the Hard-KOR Stabilizer to our pricing below, and know that you’re going to love the way it feels.  If not, no risk…just send it on back to me and I’ll give you a full refund less shipping.  That’s how strongly I feel about it.   -Kevin-

    Like all of the products you’ll find on our website, we’ve tested and replaced part after part until we’ve found the most desirable one for a particular application on the market to sell here on our website.  The KOR and OME steering stabilizers are hands-down the clear and distinct winner when it comes to a controlled ride and improved resistance to Death Wobble, irrespective of what ANYONE else says, and we know this because we’ve tested them all.


    Designed to reduce the effect of wheel “flutter” and improve the feel, handling and control of the vehicle, our Hard-KOR steering stabilizers will also reduce the aggressive jerking of the steering wheel over rough roads without affecting steering wheel on-center return. Steering stabilizers are usually fitted forward of the front differential making them prone to rocks and other damage. Old Man Emu stabilizers feature a twin tube design and heavy gauge steel stone guard.  A can of spray paint will allow you to paint it to match the scheme on your Jeep if you aren’t a fan of “safety yellow”, lol.  If you have a WJ, make sure to purchase the add’l “WJ HARDWARE KIT**”.



    NOTE 1: OME raised prices April 2007, Oct 2007, March 2008, and May 2008

    NOTE 2: The Hard-KOR Kit intro price will only last for the first few months it’s available.

    Currently we do not offer the hardware kit separately.


     

    S/H costs: add $2 for UPS residential surcharge or it can’t be delivered to a residential address.


    Hard-KOR Secondary Steering Stabilizer Kit

    Applications Retail Price Intro Price
    ’99-’04 WJs with a stock track bar $149.97 Check Price on Our NEW Website
    ’99-’04 WJs with a JKS 1.25″ OD bar $139.97 Check Price on Our NEW Website
    Add on a primary Hard-KOR stabilizer so you can two fresh ones (includes WJ mounting hardware) $102.97 Check Price on Our NEW Website

    OME Secondary Steering Stabilizer Kit

    Applications Retail Price Kevin’s Price
    ’99-’04 WJs with a stock track bar (1.00″ OD) $165.97 Check Price on Our NEW Website
    ’99-’04 WJs with a 1.25″ OD aftermarket  bar $158.97 Check Price on Our NEW Website
    Add on a primary OME stabilizer     so you can two fresh ones (includes all WJ mounting hardware) $118.97 Check Price on Our NEW Website

    XJ-ZJ-TJ Steering Upgrades

    Have you gotten to the point where your tires are large enough that they are starting to create problems with your steering componentry?  Have you snapped a drag-link collar yet while you’re offroading?  You will, eventually, if you keep pushing it.  With 37″ tires and a stock drag link, I didn’t make it far over the Golden Crack in Moab…bent up the drag link and completely sheared off the adjustable collar.  Here is some alternates for you:

    Our WJ Tie-rod and Drag-link upgrade kit is located HERE.

    Currie makes a great setup for TJs, XJs, and ZJs.  Here is their description: Currect-Lync, the Currie heavy duty tie rod and drag link system for TJ, XJ, and MJ vehicles features a 1 1/4″ diameter forged chromoly drag link, 1 1/4″ chromoly bar stock tie rod that is bored and threaded on the ends. All 7/8″ thread tie rod ends with urethane boots, and jam nuts are included, as well as the new heavy duty steering stabilizer bracket. This unit is a direct replacement for the stock unit – no modifications or machining to any part of the vehicle is necessary.  This product does come powdercoated. 

    Kevin sez: A slick upgrade to either of these kits is the Dual Steering Stabilizer kit, which was originally made for WJs, but will work with these kits as well.  It will benefit you if you’re running larger than 33″ tires, and if you drive on the highway.  I would recommend NOT running the dual SS setup if you ONLY use it for offroad purposes (no real gain, if dirt is your only terrain) or you run in high-traction situations while you’re crawling, such as in the Southwest (adds more stress to the steering box during a time when the box is already hot from changing direction on those large meats over dry rock.

    Also available for TJs, XJs and ZJs is the kit that I run on *MY* Jeep.  It’s quite a bit more pricey, and requires slightly more installation time, but in my opinion a much better overall result as it utilizes a TRUE cross-over steering configuration, which eliminates the inverted-Y setup.  Thanks to some design changes, there is no longer any need for additional modifications…it’s completely and totally bolt-on!!  Our kit is different from the other aftermarket kits that was designed for use with TJs, as the height variance from the pitman arm to the passenger side knuckle is about 3″ taller on the ZJ and XJ versus the TJ.  In English, that means that many of the TJ aftermarket kits won’t allow enough mis-alignment when installed on a ZJ or XJ if you have more than 3 or so inches of lift.  The Drag link is 1.25″ diameter 4130 chromoly, welded, formed and heat treated for ultimate durability.  Tie rod is 1.375″ diameter 4130 chromoly, welded and heat treated for ultimate durability.  Custom 1-1/4 inch hex thread insert bungs that are radially MIG welded, for easy and proper jam nut tightening at each jam nut.  Our drag link connection at the passenger hub allows full turning radius lock to lock to match the steering box, which is another place that the aftermarket falls short sometimes.  Our dual-bent drag link design allows clearance for all aftermarket track bar bracket/sway bar bracket.  Custom knuckle extensions bolt to your original steering knuckles and two of your hub bolts, which are machined and TIG welded for strength, and tapered for the included tie rod end attachment.  You’ll have an improved steering feel, removing the “Dead Spot” commonly associated with a lifted TJ steering.  Also, another bonus is there is minimal “bump steer”, if at all, because we paid attention to the angles when the kit was being developed, and it’s also fully compatible with a stock trackbar, KOR Track Bar Conversion, Rubicon Express Extreme Duty track bar, Full Traction Drop Bracket and most others that relocate front track bar at the frame end.  You will use your stock pitman arm…no need to spend extra money on that!!  A steering stabilizer bracket is included, and it DOES require an aftermarket or OME replacement steering stabilizer, so order one from HERE if you don’t have one already.  This is the sweetest thing I’ve found on the market (or aftermarket) so far for the XJs and ZJs, and I’ve been running it for nearly two years.  It also comes powdercoated.
     

    Note: The anti-sway bar disconnect system pictured on the TJ above is not available for ZJs or XJs…I’ve already asked it’s manufacturer.


    S/H costs: $31.97 for either kit shipped, add $2.00 for residential addresses or UPS will refuse residential delivery.


    U-Turn Steering Setup

    (NOTE:  *IF* you are running 15″ wheels, this upgrade requires that your wheels have less than 4″ of backspacing.  16″ wheels should clear just fine, irrespective. -K-

    Applications Retail Price Kevin’s Price
    All ’93>’98 ZJ Grand Cherokees $699.97  Click To Go to Shopping Cart
    All ’84>’01 XJ Cherokees $699.97 Click To Go to Shopping Cart
    All ’99>’05 TJ Wranglers $699.97 Click To Go to Shopping Cart

    Currect-lync Steering Setup

    All ’93>’98 ZJ Grand Cherokees $399.97 Click To Go to Shopping Cart
    All ’84>’01 XJ Cherokees $399.97 Click To Go to Shopping Cart
    All ’99>’05 TJ Wranglers $399.97 Click To Go to Shopping Cart

    JKS Adjustable Track Bars

    The “Track Bar” is the 1″ thick rod that holds your front axle from slipping out from under your Jeep or Bronco or Dodge Ram when you turn a corner.  On a coil-sprung vehicle, the track bar locates the axle a specific distance from the driver’s side frame rail, and “steadys” the coil springs, keeping them from allowing the body of the Jeep to move independent (left and right) of the axle housing.

    Death Wobble is often caused by this connection between the axle and frame rail not being tight enough to keep the front tires from “fluttering” or going into “speed-wobble”, sort of like a shopping cart that has a bend in the frame.  The factory track bar that Jeep built is barely sufficient for stock height and factory sized tires, but when you add a little lift and put a larger (and heavier) tire on the ground with more contact patch and friction, the small Jeep track bar is not enough to take the forces, and actually “accordians” in and out under force because it’s just not up to the task of holding the axle solidly under the vehicle.

    These are the beefiest aftermarket track bars on the market, folks (25%+ thicker than factory size, and over 50% more stiff), and the only track bar on the market that I feel comfortable hanging my reputation on.  Yes, there are others, and no, I don’t recommend them.  The JKS track bars are the best you can buy, and are only a few bucks more than the weaker competitors’ bars.  When holding one of these track bars in your hand, you will immediately see why I recommend them so highly!  Be aware that the smaller the track bar diameter, the more flex the track bar will have, and the greater propensity for Death Wobble your Jeep will have (particularly on the ZJ, WJ, TJ and XJ).  Don’t mess around…only buy the best track bars on the market.

    All Adjustable Track Bars that we sell feature the following:

    • Thick .156 wall 1.25″ tubing.
    • Powder-coating and zinc plated for corrosion protection
    • 1″ diameter solid adjuster ends adjust 1/16″ for each full turn.

    • All Bushings and Johnny joints on track bars can be rebuilt / replaced
    • Length adjustment at the axle end of the track bar for easy “fine tuning”.

    • All track bars incorporate a “3 bend” design for correct alignment between mounts

    • Shipping is $12 per bar



    Shipping FREE* on all $200+ JKS orders.



    Also consider picking up a set of Hard-KOR Super Durometer bushings


    Your Adjustable Trackbar w/ super hard durometer bushings ROCKS!!!   Cured my DW!  The manufacturing and powder coating is top notch. James Stott – Ventura, CA


    Kevin’s Offroad SUPER-durometer bushings

    SUPER-durometer bushings (2 pair) for increased Death Wobble resistance Hard as concrete (well, almost) 60D hardness for a VERY RIGID connection.  Works on the JKS 127 and 155 bars easily, and the other JKS bars with some add’l work**. KOR-1199 or KOR 1189S

    **A note about retrofitting your ORGS or JKS bar with the Super-Durometer bushings mentioned above: The 125 and 126 ORGS/JKS bars come with rubber press-fit cartridge-style bushings, rather than the easily-replaceable method of using two poly bushing halves, inserted from each side of the end loop, and then sliding the included sleeve inside.  If you have the rubber-cartridge style bushings, then you cannot use the SuperDurometer 60D bushings without first removing that rubber cartridge bushing completely from your bar.  You will also need to e-mail me to get the sleeves that go along with that.  Our Hard-KOR SuperDurometer bushings will also fit into many other aftermarket manufactured track bars, so long as their bar will accept the factory rubber cartridge bushing (ask them directly if it will), as MOST aftermarket manufacturers use the same “end-loop” size as the factory track bars, including these JKS bars.

    JKS Adjustable Front Track Bars

    Applications
    JKS TRACK BARS: TJ Front with 0″~3.5″ of lift


    (left-hand drive only)

    JKS-126
    JKS TRACK BARS: TJ Front with 4+” of lift


    (left-hand drive only)

    JKS-125
    JKS TRACK BARS: WJ Front with 1″~6″ lift


    (left-hand drive only)

    JKS-127
    JKS TRACK BARS: XJ Front with 0″~3.5″ of lift


    (left-hand drive only)

    JKS-126
    JKS TRACK BARS: XJ Front with 4+” of lift


    (left-hand drive only)

    JKS-125
    JKS TRACK BARS: ZJ Front with 0″~4″ of lift


    (left-hand drive only)

    JKS-126
    JKS TRACK BARS: ZJ Front with 4+” of lift


    (left-hand drive only)

    JKS-125

    JKS Adjustable Rear Track Bars

    JKS TRACK BARS: ZJ Rear with 1″~6″ of lift Click Here for JKS/KOR PROMO
    JKS TRACK BARS: TJ Rear with 2.5″~6″ of lift (does not include necessary bracket) JKS-153
    JKS TRACK BARS: TJ Rear with 2.5″~6″ of lift (INCLUDES necessary bracket) JKS-151b

    Hard-KOR Cherokee XJ & Grand Cherokee ZJ Track Bar Conversions

    (If you have questions or a comment… post it below, and we’ll answer you ASAP!)


    Death Wobble Cures: KOR-9001 Trackbar Conversion for Jeep XJ, MJ, ZJ

    Imagine a fully adjustable track bar that eliminates the weak/worn stock upper tie rod end on ZJs and XJ/MJs factory track bar and will allow for AMAZING amounts of droop and tighten up your steering responsiveness at the same time.  This kit includes a modified upper track bar mount and the highest quality track bar that exists, custom built specifically for us to KOR’s specifications, and fully adjustable to center your front axle perfectly.  It won’t interfere with any existing suspension components and will allow MAXIMUM articulation out of your front axle assembly and a larger resistance to Death Wobble.  It’s been designed to work with XJs and ZJs from 0″=>8″ of lift.

    ARTICULATION INCREASES:

    From the factory, your passenger front tire can only droop approximately 8″ from stock height due to the upper tie rod end on the factory track bar.  Now, subtract the height of YOUR lift from the maximum of 8″, and that’s how much passenger side droop you have before the tie rod end binds causing wear and then Death Wobble.  You can test this yourself if you don’t believe me.  Just remove the lower bolt on the stock track bar and allow it to hang.  Pretty scary, huh?  Bet you didn’t know that!!  That’s the maximum it will go before it binds on itself, which is a future failure in the making!!!  Other track bar manufacturers use Heim® joints and Johnny® joints in a vertical orientation, which allow the track bar to drop a bit further than stock, but still not as much as you need.

    DEATH WOBBLE RESISTANCE:

    Due to the superior strength and thickness of our custom bar (.156 wall 1.25″ OD tube), my custom interference-fit ultra-thick bushing inserts and the 1/2″ Grade 8 hardware that comes included in the kit (50% more strength than stock bolts so that you can really torque it down without worrying about snapping the bolt off), you will see a higher Death Wobble resistance as the entire kit stiffens up the front suspension.  An added bonus: There are two additional benefits you may discover as well: an substantial increase in steering response (tighter steering = less wandering) and slightly reduced bump steer, most evident on the taller rigs.

    EVEN BETTER DEATH WOBBLE RESISTANCE:

    Recently, I’ve had some SUPER-hard Rockwell Durometer bushings made by our poly molding company.  You can’t get these anywhere else, folks.  The stock rubber bushing material that comes in the stock track bars is less than the 45d hardness of the “regular” bushings that we have used over the years.  The SUPER-hard bushings are a 60d harness, or 33% stiffer, giving even better resistance to Death Wobble.  Since others have asked, there is a less-than 5% increase in shock transmission to the cabin at 8″ of lift, so with 4″ or less, you will likely never even notice the change, but in any case, it’s a very low price to pay for what MAY cure your Death Wobble completely.

    Kevin: The new track bar works wonders. I had the XXX  traditional Adjustable TB and even with it, I was will getting DW. I have put over 150 miles with the new KOR bar and have not had one incident. Thanks!

    -Chris Miller – Sandy, UT

    ===============

    A word about the change from the factory bar and bracket to yours – WOW!!! The steering feels almost as tight and accurate as my buddy’s Boxster! And the constant clunking, shaking, and imminent death-wobble that plagued nearly every minute of travel, gone! There is a HUGE difference; the truck feels better than new! In all my years of playing with cars, I don’t think I’ve installed anything that’s made as significant a difference as your track bar conversion! Definitely money well spent. As always, I will continue to shout your name and website from the rooftops to every Jeep person I find!     Greg Dubbe – Longmont, Colorado.

    ===============

    About the track bar…..I was considering the track bar but am SOOOOOOOOOO glad I got yours.  I absolutely love it!!!!!  I had death wobbles that I have been living with for quite a while now. Some of my friends have “supposed wobbles” or “sissy wobbles” but not the true hard core steering-wheel-flying-out-of-your-hands death wobbles. Your setup is so much better (I’m sure I don’t need to tell you that) than the competitions.  Cant wait to ramp it again as I know my stock bar was holding me back. Thanks again!!!  I REALLY appreciate the customer service!!!  I was so happy to find that it was at my door two days after ordering.  Please don’t change the way you handle your customer service no matter how big your company becomes.  Very refreshing in this day. 
    -Matthew Shemenski

    ===============

    Your Adjustable Trackbar w/ super hard durometer bushings ROCKS!!!   Cured my DW!  The manufacturing and powder coating is top notch.

    James Stott – Ventura, CA

    ===============

    Hello guys,  I would like to thank you for a great product!!  I purchased the TB conversion and installed it last week end. HUGE difference!!!  I had a XXXX bar and was having problems with it eating bushings. Come to find out a weld had broken in the stabilizer mount that the XXXX bar uses. (Poor design on their part)  Now all the “popping” is GONE!!!

    -Brian Schoonmaker – Meriden, CT


    Here’s what the kit will look like under your Jeep:

    This item has a “core-charge deposit” attached to it, which will be applied to the price in the shopping cart.  I NEED THESE BRACKETS BACK FROM YOU GUYS!!!  I don’t want to keep your “core-charge” money…I want the brackets back, and if you don’t send them back to me, I have to buy them somewhere else, and that costs me time and money, which eventually gets passed back along to you guys.  So, when you get the kit installed, simply take your old bracket & mail it back to us, and we’ll pay you for your core!

    WITH YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS AND CONTACT INFORMATION and I will promptly send you a check back for the core charge.  Alternately, if you want more parts from our Manufacturing Division, I will put your core charge credit on file for you to use ALONG WITH $10 EXTRA, compliments of Kevin, to be put toward the purchase of another “KOR Manufacturing Division” part (ONLY) in the future. SURFACE RUST IS OK, BUT IF YOUR BRACKET IS PITTED OR BADLY RUSTED, WE CAN’T USE IT!!!!!!!!

    *THOUGH YOU ARE WELCOME TO PURCHASE PARTS FROM OUR PERFORMANCE DIVISION IN THE FUTURE, THIS $10 ADDITIONAL OFFER DOES NOT APPLY TO OUR PERFORMANCE DIVISION PARTS*

    Kevin’s Horizontal-Mount Track Bar Conversion Kits

    (OPTIONAL) Super Hard Durometer bushings for increased Death Wobble resistance Black and hard as concrete (well, almost) for a rigid connection KOR-1199
    Poly Bushing Special Mineral Oil Lubricant KOR-1109 Purchase from Our New Shopping Cart
    ’93~’98 ZJ Grand Cherokee, left-hand drive only KOR-9001 Purchase from Our New Shopping Cart
    ’87~’01 XJ/MJ Cherokee, left-hand drive only KOR-9001 Purchase from Our New Shopping Cart
    ’84~’86 XJ and MJ, left-hand drive only KOR-9000 Purchase from Our New Shopping Cart

    For those who did not order a TBC but want to send me your extra brackets (must be from a ZJ or ’87+ XJ), I can give you cash (price varies, depending on how much stock we have) or $10 more in credit (than what we are paying cash) per bracket. SURFACE RUST IS OK, BUT IF YOUR BRACKET IS PITTED OR BADLY RUSTED, WE CAN’T USE IT!!!!!!!!

    *Note-1: The Rubicon Express Conversion uses their Heavy Duty bar and will work for added articulation, but unfortunately they are not as stiff as the JKS bar, nor is their bracket as stiff as our modified stock bracket (it flexes), so it won’t give you the Death Wobble resistance that I designed my conversion kit to offer your Jeep.

    **Note-2: The bar and bracket we use in our kit will *NOT* work with any other manufacturer’s kit.  The JKS bar we use has a special part number for only us, and the bracket is bent/folded by our machine shop, and is not compatible with anyone else’s bar or anyone else’s bracket, unfortunately. If you have part of a kit from another manufacturer, my only recommendation to make this work for you is to sell the partial kit on eBay or your local Jeep board.

    **Note-3: When adding an aftermarket diff cover on the front axle, bear in mind that if it’s thicker than the stock one, it may need to be slightly clearanced so that it doesn’t cause rubbing on the track bar.

    Hard-KOR Window Decals

    Want a sticker for your Rock sliders, your Roof Rack or your windows?  They are now available on our new website HERE!  The price listed covers the sticker and postage to your U.S. address.  Orders of $25+ get a free “KevinsOffroad.com, Specializing in Top Quality Parts for Cherokees and Grand Cherokees” text sticker…so if you need something from the website at the same time, save a couple of bucks and place an order.

    Thank you for supporting KevinsOffroad.com!

    ZJ Grand Cherokee Snorkel

    NOTE: I do not know how adaptable these are to the 5.2L V8 models of ZJ…your guess is as good as mine, but Safari *IS* working on a model both for the ZJ V8, AND the WJ 6cyl and V8.  Works great in high water crossings. Thanks, Kevin

    Safari Snorkels  

     

     

    Safari Snorkel – SS1120HF
    The Safari SS1120-HF snorkel is tough and stylish and has been designed to deliver a huge volume of the coolest and cleanest air possible into the stock air cleaner assembly of the Jeep Grand Cherokee. 

     

     

    Right from day one, Safari took the decision to design a snorkel system that exceeded the air flow requirements of the stock 4L gasoline engine configuration and delievered the greatest engine protection possible.

    Close attention to the internal cross sectional profile, area, air velocity and flow path through each and every point along the entire length of the snorkel system ensures that the greatest air flow is achieved.

    In order to achieve the optimum air flow within the engine bay area of the Grand Cherokee, a precision moulded duct as well as a specialised cast alloy mounting duct was engineered to deliver a huge shot of fresh air directly into the air cleaner assembly. These tough ducts closely couple the snorkel body to the standard air intake assembly and take advantage of the tight spaces that would preclude the use of traditional hoses – but with the advantage that the internal cross sectional profile of this duct can be altered whilst maintaining the desired cross sectional area at each and every point along its length.

    In other words, maximum engine performance and the best possible fuel economy, but also the best structural integrity for a lifetime of hassle-free motoring over and through the world’s toughest terrain. A bonus is that the use of this special duct and hose delivers the maximum convenience for those who wish to install additional under-hood accessories

    Huge air flow is but one aspect of the ultimate in snorkel design. The Safari air ram is designed to perform two very important roles. The most obvious is to funnel cool clean air into the snorkel body – but just as importantly, the Safari air ram acts as a highly efficient water separator to remove rain water from the incoming air stream – thus ensuring safe engine operation through even the most torrential tropical storms.

    In addition, the detachable Safari air ram can be rotated to any position. This means great peace of mind for those who plan to travel in cold or high altitude conditions where heavy snow falls are anticipated. By rotating the air ram to face away from the prevailing wind/direction of motion, the air ram delivers additional protection from the choking effects of snow build-up inside the air intake.

    The Safari Snorkel body is manufactured to the highest standards in durable, UV stable, cross linked polyethylene material. In addition, the substantial material wall thickness delivers huge physical strength to ensure that the snorkel breezes through the toughest off-road conditions on the planet.

    The Safari Snorkel system is supplied as a complete and comprehensive system that includes every nut, bolt and bracket required for installation – right from robust zero-corrosion stainless steel studs, self-locking nyloc nuts and large diameter anodized body washers through to the tough plastic A-pillar inserts.

    An accurately marked template is also provided to ensure that the installation of the snorkel body to panel work is as precise as possible and to eliminate any guess work where holes need to be drilled.


    Breathe Easy – The genuine Safari Snorkel is positively sealed and delivers a continuous and cooler supply of air for the best engine protection on the planet.

     

    ZJ 4.0L Snorkel Assembly
    Applications Retail Price Our Model Number
    1993-1998 4.0L ZJ Snorkel $513.39 KOR-5481

    Throttle Body Spacers for ZJ,XJ,TJ

    The reason for this page is not to actually try to sell you a Throttle Body spacer…it’s to get you to ask some questions before you blindly throw away $60-something dollars on a modification that will supposedly improve the power of your engine.

    First, let me begin by explaining my “gut-instinct”, which means nothing in the grand scheme of things, but I want to be fair and start by saying that I have a HUGE suspicion that these things are more along the lines of a “magical” fuel ionizer which clips to your fuel line and gives you 25% better fuel economy.  In other words, I call B.S.  Here’s my thoughts:

    Back in the days of carburetors, there was a distinct benefit of keeping the carburetor as cool as you could, because cooler fuel was denser fuel, and you could pack more of a charge into the cylinder, giving you more horsepower.  Drag racers used to use PLYWOOD spacers to keep the heat transfer from the intake manifold to the carburetor throttle plate at a minimum, which kept the fuel cooler.  They even had “cool-cans” which served a similar purpose (cooling the fuel down), which was a coffee can with a long length of steel fuel line coiled inside, which they then added ice to, which cooled the fuel down before it arrived the carburetor.  I think this may have been where throttle body spacers got their reputation for “adding power”, whereas they may well have been “reducing heat transfer” instead.

    Another selling point the throttle body spacers guys use is that it increases the amount of air inside the intake plenum.  Ok, I buy that, but do they mean to tell me that EVERY single engine they sell a throttle body spacer for benefits from EXACTLY one inch of additional air space?  All of them seem to range from 3/4″ to 1.25″…is it possible that EVERY auto manufacturer screwed up EVERY intake manifold they designed by making it exactly 1″ too short, and that this missing one inch column of air returns the engine back to it’s “optimum” efficiency?  Could this be possible in a world with CAD design, and computer aided flow-benches, and so on and so forth?  Again, I call B.S.

    Let’s talk for a moment about this “swirling” effect that some throttle body spacer manufacturers claim assists in “efficient atomization”.  First off, if we are talking about a carburetor, then MAYBE this USED to have some effect…air swirling around and mixing the atomized fuel it pulled through the venturi  into the intake manifold may have made some positive effect.  However, in a fuel-injected vehicle (throttle body or port injection…it doesn’t matter), like most all of our Jeeps in today’s world are manufactured, the atomization is done by a high-pressure fuel pump supplying an electronically-timed injector which “mists” a certain amount of fuel into the intake manifold.  Would “swirling” air make an increase in power when the fuel is already atomized?  If so, how?  And, if that WERE the case, are we to believe that the air being “swirled” in one column down the throttle plate is supposed to split off into 6 or 8 separate “tornados” and each swirling tornado will somehow find it’s way through several right and left turns, through the intake valve and into the cylinder while it’s still swirling and carrying on?  B.S.!!!!!!!!  There is no way.  I’m no Doctor of Physics, so maybe I’m wrong, but until someone can prove to me that swirling air can not only be split from one column into 8 equal swirls and EACH of those will find their way into each of 6 or 8 cylinders past the intake valve, I don’t buy it for a moment!!

    So, that said, I have been told by other mechanics and retailers that the 1991-1998 4.0L HO engines DO indeed benefit from a throttle body spacer.  Maybe it’s because AMC/Jeep designed the intake manifold too small, and that extra 1″ column of air actually DOES help.  I don’t have any other explanation.  Remember…there was very little CAD being used back in the 80s when that particular manifold was designed, so maybe it IS too small?? I have been told that the 5.2L and 4.7L engines benefit very little, if at all, from a throttle body spacer.  The 5.2L manifold was designed in the early-90s and the 4.7L manifold was designed in the late-90s.  AND, furthermore, since the 4.0L manifold was REDESIGNED in the late-90s for the 1999 model year, then THAT would explain also why the spacer seems to work better on the ’91-’98 models.

    Anyway, far less than scientific results, I realize…but I think I made some pretty good points above.  If you have any more-scientific results than mine, send me a link and I’ll post it below in my Throttle Body Spacer link section.

    Thanks, Kevin


    So, if you are still bent on ordering one up after all that, I prefer you do it from us rather than someone else, so here’s your link to do so, and thank you for your loyalty!


    Throttle Body Spacers

    Applications Retail Price Kevin’s Price Our Model #
    All ’91>’98 XJ/ZJ/TJ/YJ 4.0L motors $129.97 $109.97
    Contact Us

    Available Options Below

    Ship to a Residential Address $2.00 $2.00

    Wrangler JK and TJ Products by JKS

    New at KOR: Wrangler JK/TJ products

    Now carrying the entire line of JKS products for Wranglers.  If you don’t see a part, give us the number, and we’ll get you taken care of right away, with FREE** shipping!
    (Free Shipping: see restrictions below)
    Click on the Product below for more info.
    FREE SHIPPING on all JKS products we carry!!


    ’97-’06 TJ Wranglers Part Number Shipping
    Quicker Disconnects JKS-2000 JKS-2001 JKS-2002 FREE!
    Adjustable Rear Trackbars JKS-153 FREE!
    Adjustable Front Trackbars JKS-125 JKS-126 FREE!
    HD Tie Rod e-mail us FREE!